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Hepatitis D outbreak among children in a hepatitis B hyper-endemic settlement in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94180
Source
J Viral Hepat. 2009 Sep 25;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2009
Author
BørresenM L
OlsenO R
LadefogedK.
McMahonB J
HjulerT.
PanumI.
SimonettiJ.
JonesC.
KrarupH.
KochA.
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Viral Hepat. 2009 Sep 25;
Date
Sep-25-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Summary. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic in Greenland with 5-10% of the population being HBsAg-positive (chronic carriers). Surprisingly, despite of the high prevalence of HBV infection, acute and chronic hepatitis B, liver cirrhosis and primary hepatocellular carcinoma appear much less frequently than expected. The reasons for the low frequencies are unknown, but as a consequence implementation of a childhood HBV vaccination programme, though debated for years, has never been instituted. We describe an outbreak of hepatitis D (HDV) infection among children in a hepatitis B hyper-endemic settlement of 133 inhabitants on the west coast of Greenland. In 2006 a total of 27% of the inhabitants were HBsAg-positive (chronic carriers) and 83% were HBcAb-positive (previously exposed). Forty-six percent of the HBsAg-positive persons were below 20 years of age. On follow-up 1 year later a total of 68% of the HBsAg-positive persons were HDV-IgG positive. Five children, who were HBsAg-positive in 2006, had HDV-seroconverted from 2006 to 2007, indicating a HDV-super-infection. Most of the HDV-IgG positive children had markedly elevated liver enzymes. In the multivariate analysis, among the HBV and HDV markers, presence of HDV-IgG was most strongly associated with elevation of liver enzymes. In conclusion, the HBV-HDV super-infection and presumed HDV outbreak in this settlement challenges the notion that HBV infection may not be as harmless in Greenland as previously anticipated. The findings strongly suggest that HBV vaccination should be included in the child-immunization program in Greenland.
PubMed ID
19780937 View in PubMed
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A National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group Study--IND.135: Phase I/II study of irinotecan (camptosar), oxaliplatin and raltitrexed (tomudex) (COT) in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171694
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2006 Jan;42(2):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
J A Maroun
D. Jonker
L. Seymour
R. Goel
M. Vincent
W. Kocha
C. Cripps
B. Fisher
D. Lister
A. Malpage
G. Chiritescu
Author Affiliation
Medical Oncology, The Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1H 8L6. jmaroun@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2006 Jan;42(2):193-9
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Camptothecin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives
Canada
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Maximum Tolerated Dose
Middle Aged
Organoplatinum Compounds - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Quinazolines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Thiophenes - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Thirty-one patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were enrolled in this phase I/II trial of a triple combination of camptosar (C), oxaliplatin (O) and tomudex (T), all given on day one of a convenient three-week schedule. Patients received 257 cycles (1-18) in five cohorts. Toxicity was manageable and haematological toxicity was mild to moderate. Diarrhoea was the main dose-limiting toxicity; nausea and vomiting were common. Fatigue was frequent, moderate in severity and a reason for discontinuation in some patients. The recommended phase II doses were (C) 220 mg/m(2), (O) 100mg/m(2), (T) 2.75 mg/m(2). A 50% response rate in 30 evaluable patients was confirmed by an independent radiology review board; progression-free survival and overall median survival were 7.3 months and 16.6 months, respectively. Of the 16 patients treated at the recommended dose, 9 (56.3%) experienced partial response. Further evaluation in a randomized study compared to sequential doublets is warranted. Triple combinations could be relevant in curative settings for high-risk patients.
PubMed ID
16330204 View in PubMed
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