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Attribute importance segmentation of Norwegian seafood consumers: The inclusion of salient packaging attributes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291603
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Svein Ottar Olsen
Ho Huu Tuu
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: svein.o.olsen@uit.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Consumer Behavior - economics
Cookbooks as Topic - economics
Cooking - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Packaging - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Food Quality
Food, Preserved - adverse effects - economics
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Internet
Male
Meals - ethnology
Models, Psychological
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Seafood - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of product attributes when buying seafood for homemade meals on weekdays. There is a particular focus on the relative importance of the packaging attributes of fresh seafood. The results are based on a representative survey of 840 Norwegian consumers between 18 and 80 years of age. This study found that taste, freshness, nutritional value and naturalness are the most important attributes for the home consumption of seafood. Except for the high importance of information about expiration date, most other packaging attributes have only medium importance. Three consumer segments are identified based on the importance of 33 attributes associated with seafood: Perfectionists, Quality Conscious and Careless Consumers. The Quality Conscious consumers feel more self-confident in their evaluation of quality, and are less concerned with packaging, branding, convenience and emotional benefits compared to the Perfectionists. Careless Consumers are important as regular consumers of convenient and pre-packed seafood products and value recipe information on the packaging. The seafood industry may use the results provided in this study to strengthen their positioning of seafood across three different consumer segments.
PubMed ID
28669742 View in PubMed
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The perceived healthiness of functional foods. A conjoint study of Danish, Finnish and American consumers' perception of functional foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61633
Source
Appetite. 2003 Feb;40(1):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Tino Bech-Larsen
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
The MAPP Centre, The Aarhus School of Business, Haslegaardsvej 10, DK-8210, Aarhus V, Denmark. tib@asb.dk
Source
Appetite. 2003 Feb;40(1):9-14
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Consumer Satisfaction
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Finland
Food Technology - economics
Food, Fortified
Food, Genetically Modified
Health Food
Humans
Nutrition
Perception
Public Health
United States
Abstract
Functional foods presumably enable the consumer to lead a healthier life without changing eating habits. Whether consumers accept this proposition or not is potentially influenced by their perceptions of the healthiness of the processing methods, enrichment components, food-types, and health claims used in the production and marketing of functional foods. Because consumers may perceive functional enrichment as interfering with nature, cultural values pertaining to man's manipulation of nature may also influence consumer acceptance of functional foods.The purpose of the study described here is to clarify to which extent Danish, Finnish and American consumers' perceptions of the healthiness of functional foods are explained by the factors mentioned above. The general results indicate that values pertaining to man's manipulation of nature is only modestly related to the acceptance of functional foods, whereas the use of different health claims, processing methods, enrichments, product types, and especially the interactions between the two latter, are important determinants of consumers' perceptions of the healthiness of functional foods.
PubMed ID
12631500 View in PubMed
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Resveratrol and health from a consumer perspective: perception, attitude, and adoption of a new functional ingredient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268890
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2015 Aug;1348(1):171-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Jessica Aschemann-Witzel
Klaus G Grunert
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2015 Aug;1348(1):171-9
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Consumer Behavior
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Dietary Supplements
Health
Humans
Life Style
Stilbenes - administration & dosage
United States
Abstract
Resveratrol is an ingredient widely researched, with growing evidence of health-promoting effects. However, the reactions of supplement or food consumers to resveratrol has not been researched, and the ingredient is yet unknown to most consumers. We used respective literature and our own resveratrol consumer studies with Danish and U.S. consumers to look at current findings and future research directions for three questions. (1) Which factors determine consumer interest in a yet unknown functional ingredient such as resveratrol? (2) How should resveratrol be marketed as a new functional ingredient to be understood and favorably perceived? (3) What could be the effects of adoption of an ingredient such as resveratrol on the healthy lifestyle of a consumer? Literature and first results indicate that personal relevance and familiarity are crucial factors; however, consumers show little interest in resveratrol and lack relevant knowledge, especially in Denmark. Favorable attitudes were explained by health outcome expectations, use of complementary and alternative medicine, and interest in the indulgence dimension of food. Nonscientifically phrased communication led to more favorable attitudes in Danish consumers; scientifically phrased communication, though, made U.S. consumers more likely to retain favorable attitudes in the presence of contradictory evidence. We discuss future research directions in different cultural backgrounds and market contexts and for different foods.
PubMed ID
26315295 View in PubMed
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Resveratrol food supplements: a survey on the role of individual consumer characteristics in predicting the attitudes and adoption intentions of US American and Danish respondents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267546
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:110
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jessica Aschemann-Witzel
Klaus G Grunert
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:110
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Stilbenes - administration & dosage
United States
Abstract
Consumers increasingly choose food supplements in addition to their diet. Research on supplement users finds they are likely to be female, older and well-educated; Furthermore, supplement users are often characterised as being especially health-oriented, an observation which is termed the 'inverse supplement hypothesis'. However, results are dependent on the substance in question. Little is known so far about botanicals in general, and more specifically, little is known about resveratrol. The psychographic variables of food supplement users are yet relatively underexplored. By comparing US and Danish respondents, we aimed to identify whether sociodemographic variables, health status, health beliefs and behaviour and interest in food aspects specifically relevant to resveratrol (e.g., naturalness, indulgence, and Mediterranean food) explain favourable attitudes and adoption intentions toward resveratrol supplements.
A survey sent to a representative online panel in the United States and Denmark was analysed using linear regression.
We find that sociodemographic variables contribute little to explaining favourable attitudes toward and adoption intentions of resveratrol supplements, except for the negative association with higher education in the United States. The inverse supplement hypothesis was not confirmed. Belief in the favourable health effects of resveratrol and usage of complementary and alternative medicine positively affect attitudes and adoption intention. An interest in the indulgence dimension of food explains positive attitudes in the United States and adoption intentions in both countries.
The results indicate that potential consumers of resveratrol supplements are identified by their usage of complementary and alternative medicine, rather than by sociodemographic variables. They are not characterised by especially healthy behaviours, which contradicts the inverse supplement hypothesis. Instead, potential consumers of resveratrol supplements may be characterised by their focus on the indulgence dimension of food.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25885176 View in PubMed
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Social and individual determinants of adolescents' acceptance of novel healthy and cool snack products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265469
Source
Appetite. 2014 Dec;83:226-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Maria Kümpel Nørgaard
Bjarne Taulo Sørensen
Klaus G Grunert
Source
Appetite. 2014 Dec;83:226-35
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Behavior
Costs and Cost Analysis
Denmark
Female
Food Labeling
Food Preferences
Food Services
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Nutrition Policy
Patient compliance
Peer Group
Schools
Snacks
Social Behavior
Abstract
Four new, healthy snack products, consisting of fruit, vegetables, bread, dip and topping, were tested with 600 Danish adolescents aged 9-16. Participants could view, handle, and test the products in a school setting. Acceptance was measured by overall buying intention, as well as buying intention contingent on specific substitutes and on the social situation. Price consciousness, health consciousness, snack neophobia, peer influence, social activities and word-of-mouth were measured as potential determinants of acceptance of the novel products. An exploratory analysis in TETRAD suggested that the measured constructs form three layers, with overall buying intention as the terminal causal effect, health consciousness, word of mouth, snack neophobia and peer influence as endogenous determinants, and social activities and the contingent buying intentions as mediators. Estimation of the causal relationships was conducted in LISREL. Findings show a predominance of social factors as determinants of novel snack acceptance, whereas health consciousness had only a weak and indirect effect on buying intentions and the effect of snack neophobia was partly mediated by social factors.
PubMed ID
25173064 View in PubMed
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Social discourses of healthy eating. A market segmentation approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100546
Source
Appetite. 2010 Oct;55(2):288-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Polymeros Chrysochou
Søren Askegaard
Klaus G Grunert
Dorthe Brogård Kristensen
Author Affiliation
MAPP, Department of Marketing and Statistics, Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus University, Haslegaardsvej 10, Aarhus V, Denmark. polyc@asb.dk
Source
Appetite. 2010 Oct;55(2):288-97
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advertising as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Denmark
Eating
Female
Food Preferences
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper proposes a framework of discourses regarding consumers' healthy eating as a useful conceptual scheme for market segmentation purposes. The objectives are: (a) to identify the appropriate number of health-related segments based on the underlying discursive subject positions of the framework, (b) to validate and further describe the segments based on their socio-demographic characteristics and attitudes towards healthy eating, and (c) to explore differences across segments in types of associations with food and health, as well as perceptions of food healthfulness.316 Danish consumers participated in a survey that included measures of the underlying subject positions of the proposed framework, followed by a word association task that aimed to explore types of associations with food and health, and perceptions of food healthfulness. A latent class clustering approach revealed three consumer segments: the Common, the Idealists and the Pragmatists. Based on the addressed objectives, differences across the segments are described and implications of findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
20600410 View in PubMed
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To eat or not to eat pork, how frequently and how varied? Insights from the quantitative Q-PorkChains consumer survey in four European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101777
Source
Meat Sci. 2011 Aug;88(4):619-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Wim Verbeke
Federico J A Pérez-Cueto
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
Ghent University, Department of Agricultural Economics, Coupure links 653, B-9000 Gent, Belgium. wim.verbeke@ugent.be
Source
Meat Sci. 2011 Aug;88(4):619-26
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Belgium
Demography
Denmark
Female
Food Habits
Germany
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Overweight
Poland
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Swine
Thinness
Abstract
This study uses pork consumption frequency and variety to identify and profile European pork consumer segments. Data (n=1931) were collected in January 2008 in Belgium, Denmark, Germany and Poland. "Non-pork eaters" are profiled as predominantly younger (30 kg/m²) males. The segment "High variety, Medium frequency" (50.1%) includes families and other non-single households, with a profile that matches the overall sample. Their pork consumption is balanced over a wide range of pork cuts and pork meat products. Each segment entails specific challenges for the industry and the public health sector.
PubMed ID
21419579 View in PubMed
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Use and understanding of nutrition information on food labels in six European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99953
Source
Z Gesundh Wiss. 2010 Jun;18(3):261-277
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Klaus G Grunert
Laura Fernández-Celemín
Josephine M Wills
Stefan Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann
Liliya Nureeva
Source
Z Gesundh Wiss. 2010 Jun;18(3):261-277
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIM: The goal of the study was to investigate the use of nutrition information on food labels and understanding of guideline daily amount (GDA) front-of-pack nutrition labels in six European countries. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In-store observations and in-store interviews were conducted in major retailers in the UK (n?=?2019), Sweden (n?=?1858), France (n?=?2337), Germany (n?=?1963), Poland (n?=?1800) and Hungary (n?=?1804), supplemented by questionnaires filled out at home and returned (overall response rate 50.3%). Use of labels was measured by combining in-store observations and in-store interviews on concrete purchases in six product categories. Understanding of GDA front-of-pack nutrition labels was measured by a variety of tasks dealing with conceptual understanding, substantial understanding and health inferences. Demographics, nutrition knowledge and interest in healthy eating were measured as potential determinants. RESULTS: Across six product categories, 16.8% of shoppers were found to have looked for nutrition information on the label, with the nutrition grid (table or list), GDA labels and the ingredients list as the main sources consulted and calories, fat and sugar the information most often looked for. Understanding of GDA labels was high in the UK, Sweden and Germany, and more limited in the other countries. Regression analysis showed that, in addition to country-specific differences, use and understanding are also affected by differences in interest in healthy eating and in nutrition knowledge and by social grade. CONCLUSION: Understanding of nutrition information seems to be more widespread than use, suggesting that lack of use is a question of not only understanding, but also motivation. Considerable national differences exist in both understanding and use, some of which may be attributed to different histories of the role of nutrition in the public debate.
PubMed ID
21124644 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.