Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

[Anatomic trauma scoring following accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170721
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):479; author reply 479
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-2006
Author
Kjetil Søreide
Andreas Krüger
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):479; author reply 479
Date
Feb-9-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Norway
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Wounds and Injuries - diagnosis - etiology
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3252-516327847
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3248-5116327846
PubMed ID
16477292 View in PubMed
Less detail

Axel H. Cappelen, MD (1858-1919): first suture of a myocardial laceration from a cardiac stab wound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170295
Source
J Trauma. 2006 Mar;60(3):653-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Kjetil Söreide
Jon Arne Söreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. ksoreide@mac.com
Source
J Trauma. 2006 Mar;60(3):653-4
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Vessels - injuries
Heart Injuries - history
Heart Ventricles - injuries
Hemothorax - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway
Sutures - history
Thoracotomy - history
Wounds, Stab - history
PubMed ID
16531871 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical patterns of presentation and attenuated inflammatory response in octo- and nonagenarians with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283727
Source
Surgery. 2016 Aug;160(2):341-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Kjetil Søreide
Kenneth Thorsen
Jon Arne Søreide
Source
Surgery. 2016 Aug;160(2):341-9
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - complications - mortality - therapy
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Time-to-Treatment
Abstract
Perforated gastrodudenal ulcer (PGDU) is an operative emergency with high mortality rates. The growing elderly population increasingly presents with need for geriatric acute operative care. Current knowledge of age-specific characteristics in presentation, diagnosis, and outcome for PGDU in the elderly is scarce.
We reviewed a consecutive, population-based cohort of patients with PGDU, octa- and nonagenarians were compared with younger patients for variation in patterns of presentation and outcomes. Patterns and outcomes observed included 30-day mortality, serious complications (Clavien-Dindo 3 and 4), and duration of stay.
Of the 244 patients, 127 were women (52%); median age was 68 years; and 59 patients (24.2%) were =80 years. Two thirds had gastric ulcers (n = 168; 67.2%). On admission, hemoglobin levels, white blood cell count, and serum levels of C-reactive protein, bilirubin, and albumin differed significantly between the age groups. Diagnosis, treatment, and the occurrence of severe complications did not differ with age. The median hours of delay to definitive treatment did not differ significantly for all ages, but patients =80 years had a greater proportion (44.1% compared with 25.8%) of delay >12 hours (odds ratio 2.26, 95% confidence interval 1.22-4.17; P = .008). Overall mortality was 38 (15.6%); no deaths occurred in patients
PubMed ID
27067159 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing the accuracy of four prognostic scoring systems in patients operated on for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282620
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2017 Mar;65(3):609-615
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Andreas Reite
Kjetil Søreide
Morten Vetrhus
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2017 Mar;65(3):609-615
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging - mortality - surgery
Aortic Rupture - diagnostic imaging - mortality - surgery
Area Under Curve
Chi-Square Distribution
Decision Support Techniques
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Hospitals, University
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Predictive value of tests
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Abstract
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs) are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Several prognostic scoring systems are available for prediction of outcome, but scarcity of external validation and evaluation of predictive value has hampered widespread implementation. The aim of this study was to examine the discriminatory value of four scores in a consecutive Norwegian cohort.
This was a retrospective study of a consecutive series of patients operated on for primary rAAA at Stavanger University Hospital from January 2000 to December 2014. The Hardman Index, Vancouver Score (VS), updated Glasgow Aneurysm Score, and Edinburgh Ruptured Aneurysm Score (ERAS) were calculated. Predictive ability in discriminating survivors and nonsurvivors was compared using receiver operating characteristics analyses and presented as area under the curve.
Altogether, 177 patients underwent surgery for rAAA. Mortality at 30 days was 46.3%. In receiver operating characteristics analysis, the Hardman Index had an area under the curve of 0.674 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.588-0.753); the VS, 0.684 (95% CI, 0.610-0.752); the Glasgow Aneurysm Score, 0.680 (95% CI, 0.605-0.749); and the ERAS, 0.586 (95% CI, 0.509-0.660). VS had a significantly better fit than ERAS (P = .022).
The accuracy of the available scores is limited. The findings question the clinical value of such scores for decision-making.
PubMed ID
27743804 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contemporary practice and short-term outcomes after liver resections in a complete national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301132
Source
Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2019 Feb; 404(1):11-19
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Kristoffer Lassen
Linn Såve Nymo
Frank Olsen
Kristoffer Watten Brudvik
Åsmund Avdem Fretland
Kjetil Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of HPB Surgery, Oslo University Hospital at Rikshospitalet, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0372, Oslo, Norway. krlass@ous-hf.no.
Source
Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2019 Feb; 404(1):11-19
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Hepatectomy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Laparoscopy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay
Liver Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Reoperation
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Improved outcome after liver resections have been reported in several series, but outcomes from national cohorts are scarce. Our aim was to evaluate nationwide practice and short-term outcomes after liver surgery in a universal healthcare system.
A complete 5-year cohort of all liver resections from the Norwegian Patient Registry (NPR). Short-term outcomes were aggregated length of stay (a-LoS), reoperation and 90-day mortality.
Of 2118 liver resections, 605 (28.6%) were major, median age was 65 years and 1184 (55%) were male. Most common indication was metastatic disease (n?=?1554; 73.4%) and primary malignancy (n?=?328; 15.3%). Laparoscopy was performed in 513 (33.9%) of minor and 37 (6.1%) of major liver resections and increased over time to 39.1% of minor resections in 2016. Median a-LoS was 12 days for major resections, 8 days for open minor and 3 days for laparoscopic minor resections. Reoperation was reported for 159 (7.4%) and 90-day mortality for 44 (2.1%). Primary malignancy, male gender, elderly patients and major resections were associated with poorer outcome.
In a national cohort, laparoscopy is used for a substantial proportion of minor resections and was associated with reduced a-LoS. Risk factors for reoperation and mortality were male gender, increased age and major resection for primary malignancy.
PubMed ID
30519886 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contemporary use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP): A Norwegian prospective, multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101652
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Sep;46(9):1144-1151
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Tom Glomsaker
Kjetil Søreide
Geir Hoff
Lars Aabakken
Jon Arne Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery , Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger , Norway.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Sep;46(9):1144-1151
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract Objective. Novel imaging modalities have supplanted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the diagnosis of hepatobiliary pancreatic diseases, but the use of ERCP as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in current clinical practice is not well known. The main objective of this study was to describe and evaluate contemporary use of ERCP in Norway. Material and methods. Prospective and consecutive data were collected between January 2007 and December 2009 from voluntary institutional reports of ERCP activity at participating hospitals in the Gastronet database. Results. A total of 3840 procedures at 14 hospitals were registered during the study period. Data from 3809 procedures (53% females) were available for evaluation. Patients were =60 years of age in 2567 (67%) procedures. High co-morbidity (ASA score =3) was present in 32% of patients. The main indication for ERCP was evaluation and therapy of bile duct-related disorders. Successful bile duct cannulation was achieved in 93%. Pre-cut sphincterotomy was performed in 5% of procedures, and a guide wire to facilitate duct access was employed in 63%. Sphincterotomy, treatment for common bile duct stones (CBDS), and an insertion or change of bile duct stents were the most commonly employed procedures. Complications occurred in 10% of the patients, with a procedure-related mortality of 1%. Conclusions. In Norway, ERCP is predominantly performed for CBDS and biliary strictures in elderly patients with associated co-morbidity. Patient selection, indications, and procedures are in concert with international guidelines and recommendations. Disease patterns in Norway differ slightly from those observed in central Europe and North America.
PubMed ID
21692712 View in PubMed
Less detail

Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetranucleotides (EMAST) in Colorectal Cancer is Associated with an Elderly, Frail Phenotype and Improved Recurrence-Free Survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308337
Source
Ann Surg Oncol. 2020 Apr; 27(4):1058-1067
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Martin M Watson
Arezo Kanani
Dordi Lea
Ramesh B Khajavi
Jon Arne Søreide
Hartwig Kørner
Hanne R Hagland
Kjetil Søreide
Author Affiliation
Gastrointestinal Translational Research Unit, Laboratory for Molecular Biology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Ann Surg Oncol. 2020 Apr; 27(4):1058-1067
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colorectal Neoplasms - genetics - mortality - pathology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Frail Elderly
Humans
Male
Microsatellite Instability
Microsatellite Repeats
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasm Staging
Norway - epidemiology
Phenotype
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotides (EMAST) is a poorly investigated form of microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer (CRC).
The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathological features of EMAST in CRC and its relation to outcome.
A population-based, consecutive cohort of surgically treated stage I-III CRC patients investigated for high-frequency MSI (MSI-H) and EMAST. Clinicopathological differences were reported as odds ratios (OR) and survival was presented as hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Of 161 patients included, 25% were aged?>?79 years. There was a large overlap in the prevalence of EMAST (31.7%) and MSI-H (27.3%) [82.4% of EMAST were also MSI-H]. EMAST had the highest prevalence in the proximal colon (OR 15.9, 95% CI 5.6-45.1; p?
PubMed ID
31686344 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumours: single-institution experience and clinical presentation over three decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135313
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2011 Dec;35(6):515-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Oddvar M Sandvik
Kjetil Søreide
Jan Terje Kvaløy
Einar Gudlaugsson
Jon Arne Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2011 Dec;35(6):515-20
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
Epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is sparsely described. We report a population-based consecutive case series of GIST over three decades from south-western Norway.
All mesenchymal tumours registered at Stavanger University Hospital between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed and those of the gastrointestinal tract were reclassified with regard to histomorphology and/or immunohistochemistry profiles consistent with GIST. Reported are patients' characteristics and GIST incidence and prevalence estimated using population statistics.
Fifty-two cases were identified; 62% of the patients were women. Median age at diagnosis was 67 years. Fifty-eight percent of the tumours were located in the stomach, 38% in the small bowel and one each in colon and rectum. One third were considered to be high risk according to the NIH consensus criteria. The crude incidence rate of GIST was 1.8 per million in the study population per year in the 5-year period 1980-1984, and increased to around 6 in the following years with a peak at 12.5 per million in 2000-2004. The over all crude incidence rate for 1980-2009 was 6.5 per million (95% CI 4.8-8.3 per mill.). Standardized age- and gender adjusted incidence for Norway was 7.4 per million (95% CI 5.4-9.4). The number of patients alive with GIST increased over the study period, with a peak in 2000-2004 at 92.1 per million (95% CI 60.7-134.0 per mill.). One in five had an additional gastrointestinal cancer, located in the colon (n=6), rectum (n=2), stomach (n=3) or, pancreas (n=1).
Incidence of GIST in the south-western part of Norway is relatively stable and towards the lower end of the range reported in the worldwide literature. An increasing prevalence likely reflects therapy effects. Synchronous gastrointestinal cancers are relatively common in patients with GIST.
PubMed ID
21489899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology of perforated peptic ulcer: age- and gender-adjusted analysis of incidence and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116691
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2013 Jan 21;19(3):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-21-2013
Author
Kenneth Thorsen
Jon Arne Søreide
Jan Terje Kvaløy
Tom Glomsaker
Kjetil Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway.
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2013 Jan 21;19(3):347-54
Date
Jan-21-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Biopsy
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
To investigate the epidemiological trends in incidence and mortality of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) in a well-defined Norwegian population.
A retrospective, population-based, single-center, consecutive cohort study of all patients diagnosed with benign perforated peptic ulcer. Included were both gastric and duodenal ulcer patients admitted to Stavanger University Hospital between January 2001 and December 2010. Ulcers with a malignant neoplasia diagnosis, verified by histology after biopsy or resection, were excluded. Patients were identified from the hospitals administrative electronic database using pertinent ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes (K25.1, K25.2, K25.5, K25.6, K26.1, K26.2, K26.5, K26.6). Additional searches using appropriate codes for relevant laparoscopic and open surgical procedures (e.g., JDA 60, JDA 61, JDH 70 and JDH 71) were performed to enable a complete identification of all patients. Patient demographics, presentation patterns and clinical data were retrieved from hospital records and surgical notes. Crude and adjusted incidence and mortality rates were estimated by using national population demographics data.
In the study period, a total of 172 patients with PPU were identified. The adjusted incidence rate for the overall 10-year period was 6.5 per 100 000 per year (95%CI: 5.6-7.6) and the adjusted mortality rate for the overall 10-year period was 1.1 per 100 000 per year (95%CI: 0.7-1.6). A non-significant decline in adjusted incidence rate from 9.7 to 5.6 occurred during the decade. The standardized mortality ratio for the whole study period was 5.7 (95%CI: 3.9-8.2), while the total 30-d mortality was 16.3%. No difference in incidence or mortality was found between genders. However, for patients = 60 years, the incidence increased over 10-fold, and mortality more than 50-fold, compared to younger ages. The admission rates outside office hours were high with almost two out of three (63%) admissions seen at evening/night time shifts and/or during weekends. The observed seasonal variations in admissions were not statistically significant.
The adjusted incidence rate, seasonal distribution and mortality rate was stable. PPU frequently presents outside regular work-hours. Increase in incidence and mortality occurs with older age.
Notes
Cites: J Gastrointest Surg. 2011 Aug;15(8):1329-3521567292
Cites: Gut. 1993 Dec;34(12):1666-718282252
Cites: Epidemiology. 2000 Jul;11(4):434-910874551
Cites: Med Sci Monit. 2000 Mar-Apr;6(2):369-7211208340
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 May 1;141(9):836-447717360
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl. 1996;220:128-318898450
Cites: J Clin Gastroenterol. 1997 Jan;24(1):2-179013343
Cites: Gut. 1997 Aug;41(2):177-809301495
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 1998 May;15(3):241-649653578
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 30;125(13):1822-416012551
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 May;101(5):945-5316573778
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2007 Jun;132(7):2320-717570207
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2009;44(1):15-2218752147
Cites: BMC Gastroenterol. 2009;9:2519379513
Cites: World J Surg. 2009 Jul;33(7):1368-7319430829
Cites: BMC Gastroenterol. 2010;10:3720398297
Cites: Dig Surg. 2010 Aug;27(3):161-920571260
Cites: World J Surg. 2011 Apr;35(4):811-621267567
Cites: Br J Surg. 2011 Jun;98(6):802-1021442610
Cites: Digestion. 2011;84(2):102-1321494041
Cites: Am Surg. 2011 Aug;77(8):1054-6021944523
Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2011 Nov;93(8):615-922041238
Cites: Dig Surg. 2011;28(5-6):360-622086121
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012 May;56(5):655-6222191386
Cites: J Epidemiol. 2012;22(6):508-1622955110
Cites: Gut. 2002 Apr;50(4):460-411889062
Cites: Dig Liver Dis. 2004 Feb;36(2):116-2015002818
Cites: Dig Surg. 2004;21(3):185-9115249752
Cites: Aust N Z J Surg. 1984 Feb;54(1):59-616586169
Cites: Ann Surg. 1988 Jan;207(1):4-62892468
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1988 Jun;35(3):281-23168554
Cites: Br J Surg. 1991 Jan;78(1):28-311671826
Cites: Gastroenterology. 1993 Apr;104(4):1083-918462796
Cites: World J Surg. 2000 Mar;24(3):277-8310658061
PubMed ID
23372356 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in a well-defined Norwegian population with trends in incidence, intervention rate, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265029
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 May;61(5):1168-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Andreas Reite
Kjetil Søreide
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Jan Terje Kvaløy
Morten Vetrhus
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 May;61(5):1168-74
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneurysm, Ruptured - mortality - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - surgery
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Ruptured infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs) represent both a life-threatening emergency for the affected patient and a considerable health burden globally. The aim of this study was to investigate the contemporary epidemiology of rAAA in a defined Norwegian population for which both hospital and autopsy data were available.
This was a retrospective, single-center population-based study of rAAA. The study includes all consecutively diagnosed prehospital and in-hospital cases of rAAA in the catchment area of Stavanger University Hospital between January 2000 and December 2012. Incidence and mortality rates (crude and adjusted) were calculated using national demographic data.
A total of 216 patients with primary rAAA were identified. The adjusted incidence rate for the study period was 11.0 per 100,000 per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.6-12.5). Twenty patients died out of the hospital, and 144 of the 196 patients (73%) admitted to the hospital underwent surgery. The intervention rate varied from 48% to 81% during the study period. The adjusted mortality rate was 7.5 per 100,000 per year (95% CI, 6.3-8.8). No differences in the incidence and mortality rates were found in comparing early and late periods. The 90-day standardized mortality ratio for the study period was 37.2 (95% CI, 31.6-43.7). The overall 90-day mortality was 68% (146 of 216 persons) and 51% (74 of 144 persons) for the patients treated for rAAA.
We found a stable incidence and mortality rate during a decade. The prehospital death rate was lower (9%), the intervention rate (73%) higher, and the total mortality (68%) lower than in most other studies. Geographic and regional differences may influence the epidemiologic description of rAAA and hence should be taken into consideration in comparing outcomes for in-hospital mortality and intervention rates.
PubMed ID
25659456 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.