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Dealing with workplace violence in emergency primary health care: a focus group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271158
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2015;16:51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tone Morken
Ingrid H Johansen
Kjersti Alsaker
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2015;16:51
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Personnel - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Safety Management - methods - organization & administration
Workplace - standards
Workplace Violence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Prevention and management of workplace violence among health workers has been described in different health care settings. However, little is known about which phenomena the emergency primary health care (EPC) organization should attend to in their strategies for preventing and managing it. In the current study, we therefore explored how EPC personnel have dealt with threats and violence from visitors or patients, focusing on how organizational factors affected the incidents.
A focus group study was performed with a sample of 37 nurses and physicians aged 25-69 years. Eight focus group interviews were conducted, and the participants were invited to talk about their experiences of violence in EPC. Analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation, searching for themes describing the participants' experiences.
Four main themes emerged for anticipating or dealing with incidents of threats or violence within the system: (1) minimizing the risk of working alone, (2) being prepared, (3) resolving the mismatch between patient expectations and the service offered, and (4) supportive manager response.
Our study shows a potential for development of better organizational strategies for protecting EPC personnel who are at risk from workplace violence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25929751 View in PubMed
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Emergency primary care personnel's perception of professional-patient interaction in aggressive incidents -- a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287073
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 May 12;17:54
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-2016
Author
Tone Morken
Kjersti Alsaker
Ingrid H Johansen
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 May 12;17:54
Date
May-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aggression
Emergency medical services
Focus Groups
Frustration
Humans
Middle Aged
Negotiating
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care
Qualitative Research
Workplace Violence
Abstract
Incidents of aggression and violence from patients and visitors occur in emergency primary care. Most previous studies have focused on risk factors such as characteristics of patient, health personnel or situation. This study aimed to explore professional-patient interaction in aggressive situations.
A focus group study with eight focus groups was performed, including a total of 37 nurses and physicians aged 25-69 years. The participants were invited to talk about their experiences of violence in emergency primary care. Analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation. Results were then illuminated by Honneth's theory The Struggle for Recognition.
We identified three main themes regarding the interaction between health personnel and patients or visitors in aggressive situations: (1) unmet needs, (2) involuntary assessment, and (3) unsolicited touch. In all interactions the aggressive behaviour could be understood as a struggle for recognition.
Aggression is more likely to arise in situations where the patients' needs or personal borders are invalidated. The struggle for personal recognition during the interaction between patient and health professionals should be addressed in health professionals' education. This knowledge might increase their awareness and help them to react in a more expedient manner.
Notes
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Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2005 Jun;50(5):469-7815882363
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Nov;73(2):205-818547777
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Mar;30(1):55-6022348514
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2015 Nov 27;:null26613970
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2015;16:5125929751
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2007 Dec;57(545):967-7018252072
Cites: J Multidiscip Healthc. 2015 Oct 03;8:449-6226491343
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2003 Oct;11(5):231-614641220
PubMed ID
27175735 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in accident and emergency attenders suffering from psychosocial crises: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133109
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Feb;68(2):402-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Mette Senneseth
Kjersti Alsaker
Gerd Karin Natvig
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. mette@senneseth.com
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Feb;68(2):402-13
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Crime Victims - psychology
Crisis Intervention - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life - psychology
Referral and Consultation
Self Report
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Suicidal ideation
Violence - psychology
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study of health-related quality of life and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in patients attending an Accident and Emergency department because of psychosocial crises.
Psychosocial crises are commonplace globally, but there is little knowledge about patients attending Accident and Emergency departments because of psychosocial crises.
Data were collected at an Accident and Emergency department in Norway from September 2008 to June 2009. A total of 99 adults participated in the baseline study and 41 of these participated at 2 months follow-up. The Short Form-36 Health Survey and the Post Traumatic Symptom Scale were used to obtain data.
Participants reported significantly lower scores in all health-related quality of life domains at baseline compared with the general Norwegian population. The mental health score was two standard deviations below the norm. Health-related quality of life scores were improved and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms were reduced after 2 months. High levels of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms were reported by 78% of the participants at baseline and 59% at follow-up. Participants with high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms at follow-up also reported low health-related quality of life scores.
This study suggests a need for an acute psychosocial intervention and an opportunity to receive follow-up support at Accident and Emergency departments.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21740459 View in PubMed
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Intimate partner violence associated with low quality of life?-?a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299619
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2018 09 04; 18(1):148
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-04-2018
Author
Kjersti Alsaker
Bente E Moen
Tone Morken
Valborg Baste
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences/ Department of Welfare and Participation, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Haugeveien 28, 5005, Bergen, Norway. Kjersti.Alsaker@hvl.no.
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2018 09 04; 18(1):148
Date
09-04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Intimate Partner Violence - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Abstract
Quality of life among abused women in Norway in 2006 was found to be significantly low compared to women at the same age in general. The aim of this study was to examine how quality of life is associated with experience of psychological and physical violence intimate partner violence among abused women seeking help after domestic partner abuse comparted to quality of life in a random sample of women in Norway.
A cross-sectional study in a random sample of 1500 women (response rate 36%, n?=?469) in Norway were performed. In addition, 191 women who sought help after domestic partner abuse were invited (44%, n?=?84). The experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) and health-related quality of life were measured in both samples. The participants were divided into: "Women seeking help" after domestic partner abuse (n?=?84); "Random sample, abused women" (n?=?127); and "Random sample, not abused women" (n?=?342).
The experience of psychological and physical violence was significantly different between the groups (p?
PubMed ID
30180829 View in PubMed
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Menstrual characteristics and night work among nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278698
Source
Ind Health. 2015;53(4):354-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Bente E Moen
Valborg Baste
Tone Morken
Kjersti Alsaker
Ståle Pallesen
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Source
Ind Health. 2015;53(4):354-60
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Menstruation - physiology
Menstruation Disturbances - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Staff
Occupational Health
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Night work has been associated with adverse effects in terms of reproductive health. Specifically, menstruation has been suggested to be negatively impacted by night work, which again may influence fertility. This study investigated whether working nights is related to menstrual characteristics and if there is a relationship between shift work disorder (SWD) and menstruation. The study was cross-sectional, response rate 38%. The sample comprised female nurses who were members of the Norwegian Nurses Association; below 50 yr of age, who were not pregnant, did not use hormonal pills or intrauterine devices and who had not reached menopause (n=766). The nurses answered a postal survey including questions about night work and menstrual characteristics. Fifteen per cent reported to have irregular menstruations. Thirty-nine per cent of the nurses were classified as having SWD. Logistic regression analyses concerning the relationship between irregular menstruations and night work did not show any associations. Furthermore, no associations were found between cycle length or bleeding period and night work parameters. No associations were found between menstrual characteristics and SWD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25914071 View in PubMed
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Sexual assault and other types of violence in intimate partner relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128780
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Mar;91(3):301-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Kjersti Alsaker
Tone Morken
Valborg Baste
Javier Campos-Serna
Bente E Moen
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. kjersti.alsaker@isf.uib.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Mar;91(3):301-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether sexual assaults are more likely to co-occur with some types of abuse rather than others in violent intimate relationships.
Cross-sectional study.
A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all Norwegian women's shelters.
Women seeking refuge at Norwegian women's shelters in 2002 and 2003.
Sexual assault and experiences of intimate partner violence were measured using the Severity of Violence against Women Scale (SVAWS) and psychological violence was measured using the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Inventory (PMWI).
Student's t-test analyses were performed between the mean values of the different acts of reported violence, and linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between sexual violence and the other forms of violence reported.
Sexual violence correlated significantly with the other eight categories in SVAWS, and with violence directed at the pregnant woman's abdomen and psychological violence in PMWI. When we adjusted all categories for each other by linear regression analysis, sexual intimate partner violence was significantly associated with hair pulling, arm twisting, spanking or biting, dominance and isolation abuse and violence directed at the pregnant woman's abdomen.
Sexual assaults are more likely to co-occur with some types of physical and psychological violence than with others. This knowledge may be important for improving our understanding of sexual violence in intimate partner relationships and in the efforts to detect intimate partner violence. Bruises, loss of hair and bite marks may suggest that sexual acts were committed against the victim's will.
PubMed ID
22168466 View in PubMed
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Threats and acts of intimate partner violence reported by users at Norwegian women's shelters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101937
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2011 Mar;26(5):950-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Kjersti Alsaker
Kjell Kristoffersen
Bente E Moen
Valborg Baste
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Research Group for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. kjersti.alsaker@isf.uib.no.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2011 Mar;26(5):950-70
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway
Public Housing
Questionnaires
Self Disclosure
Severity of Illness Index
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Spouses
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
Women (n = 87) at women's shelters in Norway, a country of high welfare and gender equality, reported a multitude of severe threats and actual acts of physical, sexual and psychological violence. An individual threatening to kill his partner represented a significant increased risk for experiencing serious acts of violence, especially when the threats were repeated. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all the women's shelters. Experiences of violence were measured by The Severity of Violence against Women Scale (SVAWS) and the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Index (PMWI).
PubMed ID
20587473 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.