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Epidemiology of hip and groin injuries in Swedish male first football league.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309606
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2020 Apr; 28(4):1325-1332
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Filip Lundgårdh
Kjell Svensson
Marie Alricsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Swedish Winter Sport Research Centre, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2020 Apr; 28(4):1325-1332
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Football - injuries
Groin - injuries
Hip Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the incidence, pattern, and burden of hip/groin injuries in Swedish professional male football players over five consecutive seasons.
Injury history from 16 football teams in the Swedish male first football league was evaluated during five consecutive seasons. The team's medical staff recorded team exposure and time-loss injuries prospectively between 2012 and 2016.
In total, 467 time-loss injuries located in the hip/groin area were recorded among 1,687 professional male football players, with an overall incidence and burden of 0.82/1,000 h and 15.6/1,000 h, respectively. There appeared to be an increased risk of hip/groin injuries during the last two seasons (2015-2016); however, the difference was not statistically significant (n.s). Recurrent injury rate was relatively low (14%), and overuse injuries accounted for the majority of injuries and absence days. Muscle injuries were the main injury type, while kicking and sprinting/running were the primary causes of injury. Goalkeepers had the lowest percentage of injuries and absence days.
Hip/groin injuries are a substantial problem in football, but does not seem to be an increasing phenomenon in the Swedish male first football league. Index and overuse injuries accounted for the majority of injuries and absence days. Thus, the focus should be on preventing hip/groin injuries to lower the injury rate. These new findings should be taken into consideration when designing and implementing preventive training interventions.
II.
PubMed ID
30895331 View in PubMed
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Muscle injuries of the lower extremity: a comparison between young and old male elite soccer players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282375
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2016 Jul;24(7):2293-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Kjell Svensson
Marie Alricsson
Gustav Karnebäck
Theo Magounakis
Suzanne Werner
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2016 Jul;24(7):2293-9
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Hematoma - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Lower Extremity - injuries
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - injuries
Prospective Studies
Soccer - injuries
Soft Tissue Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Tendon Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to make a comparison between players in two age groups in an elite male soccer team regarding injury localisation within the muscle-tendon unit, injury size and muscle group in terms of muscle injuries of the lower extremity.
Cohort study based on data collected from a Swedish elite male soccer team during the seasons 2007-2012. In total, 145 muscle injuries were included. Injury localisation to the tendon or muscle, the size of haematoma and the affected muscle group were assessed using ultrasound. Age comparison was made between younger players (=23 years) and older players (>23 years).
No difference regarding injury localisation to either the tendon or the muscle, or the size of haematoma between the two age groups was found. However, the older group of players suffered a significantly higher number of injuries to the triceps surae than the younger players (p = 0.012).
In a Swedish team of male soccer players at elite level, there was no difference between players 23 years or younger and players older than 23 years, in terms of injury distribution to muscles or tendons. Players older than 23 years sustained more injuries to triceps surae when compared with players 23 years or younger. The clinical relevance is to pay attention to muscle function of triceps surae in older players and to screen those players who may need an injury prevention programme.
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PubMed ID
25668604 View in PubMed
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Physical self-esteem, a five year follow-up study on Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97625
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):497-507
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anders Raustorp
Trevor Archer
Kjell Svensson
Thommy Perlinger
Marie Alricsson
Author Affiliation
University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences, Division of Physical Education, SE 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden. anders.raustorp@hik.se
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):497-507
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - psychology
Child
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sports
Sweden
Abstract
This study describes the levels and inter-correlations of physical self-esteem, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and body fat and, in addition, distinctive of individuals with high vs. low physical self-worth in a longitudinal design during adolescence. METHODS: At mean ages 12.7, 15.7, and 17.7 years, physical activity (steps/day) was measured for four consecutive schooldays of 77 (41 girls) Swedish adolescents. Perceived physical self-esteem, height, weight, and at ages 15.7 and 17.7 years, body fat percent was also measured. RESULTS: Boys' physical self-perception scores were higher than girls' and an overall stability during adolescents was seen. High and low physical self-worth had a significant impact regarding BMI at ages 12.7 and 17.7 years and regarding body fat at age 17.7 years in both boys and girls. CONCLUSIONS: Regression analysis indicated that BMI and body fat counter-predicted self-worth in girls age-dependently. Efforts to build adapted physical activity programs for overweight and obese are emphasized.
PubMed ID
20306762 View in PubMed
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