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Adolescent neck and shoulder pain--the association with depression, physical activity, screen-based activities, and use of health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262816
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Børge Sivertsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Lisbeth Frostholm
Kjell Morten Stormark
Mari Hysing
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - utilization
Cell Phones - utilization
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Motor Activity
Neck Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Television - utilization
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Neck and shoulder pain is frequent in adolescents, and multiple factors seem to affect the risk of such symptoms. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in Norwegian adolescence and to examine whether behavioral and emotional factors were associated with the risk of neck and shoulder pain. Finally we aimed to investigate whether neck and shoulder pain was related to the use of health services.
Data from the population-based study ung@hordaland were used. Participants were asked how often during the last 6 months they had experienced neck and shoulder pain. The association between frequent neck and shoulder pain and physical activity, symptoms of depression, and screen-based activities was evaluated using logistic regression analyses stratified by gender. The relative risk of visiting health services when reporting neck and shoulder pain was calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses.
Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported by 20.0% (1,797 of the total 8,990) and more often by girls than boys (p
PubMed ID
24746679 View in PubMed
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Adolescent school absenteeism and service use in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269789
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:626
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kristin Gärtner Askeland
Siren Haugland
Kjell Morten Stormark
Tormod Bøe
Mari Hysing
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:626
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Norway
Peer Group
Risk-Taking
Student Dropouts
Students - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
School absenteeism is linked to a range of health concerns, health risk behaviors and school dropout. It is therefore important to evaluate the extent to which adolescents with absenteeism are in contact with health care and other services. The aim of the current study was to investigate service use of Norwegian adolescents with moderate and high absenteeism in comparison to students with lower rates of absence.
The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012 targeting all pupils in upper secondary education in Hordaland County, Norway (the youth@hordaland-survey). A total of 8988 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 18 were included in the present study. Information on service use was based on adolescent self-report data collected in the youth@hordaland-survey. Absence data was collected using administrative data provided by the Hordaland County Council.
High absence (defined as being absent 15% or more the past semester) was found among 10.1% of the adolescents. Compared to their peers with low absence (less than 3% absence the past semester), adolescents with high absence were more likely to be in contact with all the services studied, including mental health services (odds ratio (OR) 3.96), adolescent health clinics (OR 2.11) and their general practitioner (GP) (OR 1.94). Frequency of contact was higher among adolescents with moderate and high absence and there seems to be a gradient of service use corresponding to the level of absence. Still, 40% of the adolescents with high absence had not been in contact with any services.
Adolescents with high absence had increased use of services, although a group of youth at risk seems to be without such contact. This finding suggests a potential to address school absenteeism through systematic collaboration between schools and health personnel.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26155938 View in PubMed
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The association between sleep problems and academic performance in primary school-aged children: Findings from a Norwegian longitudinal population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308287
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(11):e0224139
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Kjell Morten Stormark
Hedvik Elisabeth Fosse
Ståle Pallesen
Mari Hysing
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Bergen, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(11):e0224139
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Academic Performance - psychology
Adolescent
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Schools
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal association between concurrent, transitory and persistent difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (DIMS) on academic performance in children in a. longitudinal child-cohort (N = 3986) targeting school-aged children when they were 7-9 years (T1) and 11-13 years (T2) old, whilst controlling for mental health problems. DIMS were parent-reported at T1 and T2 and academic performance teacher-reported at T2. Mental health was based on child self-report at T2 using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). In all, 10.6% (n = 423) of the children had poor school performance at T2. These had more symptoms of externalizing and internalizing mental health problems (p.
PubMed ID
31697711 View in PubMed
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Body size estimation in early adolescence: factors associated with perceptual accuracy in a nonclinical sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134520
Source
Body Image. 2011 Jun;8(3):275-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Liv Sand
Bryan Lask
Kjartan Høie
Kjell Morten Stormark
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Uni Health, Bergen, Norway. liv.sand@uni.no
Source
Body Image. 2011 Jun;8(3):275-81
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Body Image
Body mass index
Body Size
Body Weight
Child
Cohort Studies
Eating Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Judgment
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Photography
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This study investigated body size estimation in Norwegian adolescents (aged 12-15; N=406) using a distorting photograph technique. The percentage of over- or underestimation was calculated for pictures of the subject, other persons and a neutral object. The Eating Disorders Inventory for Children (EDI-C) was also completed. Among adolescents at risk of eating problems, girls tended to overestimate their own body size while boys showed a pattern of underestimation, compared to a relatively accurate body perception for low-risk subjects. The groups did not differ in the perception of the neutral object. Important predictors of perceived body size included the size estimation of other children, preoccupation with weight and shape, self-esteem, and emotional instability. The results support the predictive value of body size estimation. Gender differences in judgement bias can be interpreted within present aesthetic ideals and their relation to self perception, body image, and eating problems in adolescence.
PubMed ID
21570368 View in PubMed
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Complex families and health complaints among adolescents: A population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307738
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2020 Nov; 48(7):733-742
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2020
Author
Sondre Aasen Nilsen
Mari Hysing
Kyrre Breivik
Ove Heradstveit
Eilif Vingen Sunde
Kjell Morten Stormark
Tormod Bøe
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2020 Nov; 48(7):733-742
Date
Nov-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Norway
Young Adult
Abstract
Aims: The structure of adolescents' families has become more complex over the last decades in several western countries. In parallel, health complaints among adolescents appear to have risen in the Nordic countries. This study aimed to examine the association between family structure and health complaints among Norwegian adolescents while capturing biological, half-, and stepsiblings (sibship-type) in the families. Methods: Data stem from the youth@hordaland study, an epidemiological study of adolescents aged 16-19 years (N = 10,257; participation rate = 53%) conducted in 2012. This study is based on a subsample of 8808 adolescents who lived with parent(s). The adolescents provided detailed information on sociodemographics, family structure, sibship-type, and common health complaints among youth (headache, dizziness, and abdominal, neck, back, and shoulder pain). Results: Adolescents in nuclear families and joint physical custody (JPC) reported significantly lower levels of health complaints compared to peers in single- or stepparent families. Independent of family structure, biological siblings were associated with lower levels of health complaints, while stepsiblings were associated with higher levels of health complaints, but only among girls. These findings were robust to adjustments of sociodemographic variables. Conclusions: Health complaints are frequent but unequally distributed across family structures. Adolescents in nuclear families and JPC report lower levels of health complaints compared to peers in single- or stepparent families. Considering siblings appears to be relevant, as biological- and stepsiblings were related to adolescents' symptoms, independent of family structure. In combination, knowledge about family structure and sibship-type may aid the identification of adolescents at risk of experiencing health complaints.
PubMed ID
31830876 View in PubMed
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Delayed sleep phase syndrome in adolescents: prevalence and correlates in a large population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256915
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1163
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Børge Sivertsen
Ståle Pallesen
Kjell Morten Stormark
Tormod Bøe
Astri J Lundervold
Mari Hysing
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Kalfarveien 31, 5018, Bergen, Norway. borge.sivertsen@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1163
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - epidemiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS) in adolescence, and to examine the association to insomnia and school non-attendance.
Data stem from a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012, the ung@hordaland study. In all, 10,220 adolescents aged 16-18 years (54% girls) provided self-reported data on a range of sleep parameters: DSPS was defined according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Revised (ICSD-R) criteria, while insomnia was defined according to the Quantitative Criteria for Insomnia. Other sleep parameters included time in bed, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, oversleeping, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, subjective sleep need, sleep deficiency, sleepiness and tiredness. Sleep data were calculated separately for weekdays and weekends. Data on school non-attendance were provided by official registers.
The prevalence of DSPS was 3.3%, and significantly higher among girls (3.7%) than boys (2.7%). There was a strong overlap between DSPS and insomnia, with more than half of the adolescents with DSPS also meeting the criteria for insomnia (53.8% for boys and 57.1% for girls). Adolescents with DSPS had significantly higher odds ratios (OR) of non-attendance at school. After adjusting for sociodeographical factors, insomnia and depression, the adjusted ORs for days of non-attendance were OR = 3.22 (95% CI: 1.94-5.34) for boys and OR = 1.87 (95% CI: 1.25-2.80) for girls. A similar effect was found for hours of non-attendance for boys, with an adjusted OR = 3.05 (95% CI: 1.89-4.92). The effect for girls was no longer significant after full adjustment (OR =1.48 [95% CI: 0.94-2.32]).
This is one of the first studies to estimate the prevalence of DSPS in adolescents. The high prevalence of DSPS, and overlap with insomnia, in combination with the odds of school non-attendance, suggest that a broad and thorough clinical approach is warranted when adolescents present with symptoms of DSPS.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24330358 View in PubMed
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Design of the FINS-TEENS study: A randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of fatty fish on cognitive performance in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285193
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Aug;45(6):621-629
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Siv Skotheim
Lisbeth Dahl
Katina Handeland
Livar Frøyland
Øyvind Lie
Jannike Øyen
Marian Kjellevold
Kjell Morten Stormark
Ingvild Eide Graff
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Aug;45(6):621-629
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Cognition - physiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Humans
Lunch
Male
Norway
Research Design
Schools
Abstract
To describe the rationale, study design, population and dietary compliance in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating the effect of fatty fish on cognitive performance and mental health in adolescents.
In the Fish Intervention Studies-TEENS (FINS-TEENS) study we individually randomized 478 adolescents (14-15-year-olds) from eight secondary schools in Norway to receive school meal lunches with fatty fish or meat or n-3 supplements three times a week for 12 weeks. Demographic factors, psychological tests and biological measures were collected pre-and post-intervention. Duplicate portions of lunch meals were collected and individual intake recorded throughout the study.
In total, 481 out of 785 adolescents (61%) agreed to participate and 34 (7%) dropped out. Breakfast consumption was the only group difference in background characteristics. Analyses of selected nutrients in the lunch meals showed higher levels of n-3 fatty acids, vitamin D and n-6 fatty acids in the fish compared to the meat meals. Dietary compliance (score 0-144) revealed that the intake in the Fish group (mean = 59, standard deviation (SD) = 35) were lower than in the Meat group (mean = 83, SD = 31, p
PubMed ID
28691640 View in PubMed
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A Diet Score Assessing Norwegian Adolescents' Adherence to Dietary Recommendations-Development and Test-Retest Reproducibility of the Score.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281361
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jul 29;8(8)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-29-2016
Author
Katina Handeland
Marian Kjellevold
Maria Wik Markhus
Ingvild Eide Graff
Livar Frøyland
Ã?yvind Lie
Siv Skotheim
Kjell Morten Stormark
Lisbeth Dahl
Jannike Ã?yen
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jul 29;8(8)
Date
Jul-29-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Caregivers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Female
Healthy Diet
Humans
Internet
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Observation
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Self Report
Abstract
Assessment of adolescents' dietary habits is challenging. Reliable instruments to monitor dietary trends are required to promote healthier behaviours in this group. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess adolescents' adherence to Norwegian dietary recommendations with a diet score and to report results from, and test-retest reliability of, the score. The diet score involved seven food groups and one physical activity indicator, and was applied to answers from a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered twice. Reproducibility of the score was assessed with Cohen's Kappa (? statistics) at an interval of three months. The setting was eight lower-secondary schools in Hordaland County, Norway, and subjects were adolescents (n = 472) aged 14-15 years and their caregivers. Results showed that the proportion of adolescents consistently classified by the diet score was 87.6% (? = 0.465). For food groups, proportions ranged from 74.0% to 91.6% (? = 0.249 to ? = 0.573). Less than 40% of the participants were found to adhere to recommendations for frequencies of eating fruits, vegetables, added sugar, and fish. Highest compliance to recommendations was seen for choosing water as beverage and limit the intake of red meat. The score was associated with parental socioeconomic status. The diet score was found to be reproducible at an acceptable level. Health promoting work targeting adolescents should emphasize to increase the intake of recommended foods to approach nutritional guidelines.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27483312 View in PubMed
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Early postpartum discharge: maternal depression, breastfeeding habits and different follow-up strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302537
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2019 Mar; 33(1):85-92
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019

Fatty fish, hair mercury and cognitive function in Norwegian preschool children: Results from the randomized controlled trial FINS-KIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299133
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 2):1098-1105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Ingrid Kvestad
Silje Vabø
Marian Kjellevold
Ole Jakob Nøstbakken
Lisa Kolden Midtbø
Mari Hysing
Maria Wik Markhus
Lise Madsen
Katina Handeland
Ingvild Eide Graff
Øyvind Lie
Livar Frøyland
Kjell Morten Stormark
Lisbeth Dahl
Jannike Øyen
Author Affiliation
Regional Center for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, NORCE Norwegian Research Center, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 2):1098-1105
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition - drug effects
Diet
Fishes
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Meat
Mercury - analysis - toxicity
Norway
Abstract
The toxic effects of prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) include neurological abnormalities and developmental delay of which infants and children are particular susceptible. Studies on the effects of low and moderate exposure show conflicting results. Seafood is the main dietary source of MeHg, but also contributes with nutrients regarded as beneficial for development.
To measure the change in total hair mercury concentration (THHg) after an intervention of lunch meals with fatty fish or meat in Norwegian preschool children, and to examine the associations between THHg and cognitive function.
Children (n?=?232) 4-6?years old were randomized to lunch meals with fatty fish (n?=?114) or meat (n?=?118) three times a week for 16?weeks. THHg was determined using a Direct Mercury Analyzer, and cognitive function was assessed by the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Intelligence Scale-III (WPPSI-III) pre- and post-intervention. Linear mixed effect models were used to analyze changes in THHg and WPPSI-III scores.
The mean (SD) THHg pre-intervention was 0.373 (0.204) mg?kg-1. Children in the fish group had an increase in THHg (change 0.162, 95% CI 0.111, 0.213?mg?kg-1), whereas children in the meat group had decreased THHg (-0.053, 95% CI -0.103, -0.002?mg?kg-1). There were no notable associations between THHg and the WPPSI-III raw scores at baseline or after 16?weeks of the fish/meat intervention.
Lunch meals including fatty fish led to a significant increase in THHg, but the values remain below the point of departures used for risk assessment by the EFSA, WHO and US-EPA. We observed no associations between THHg and cognitive function.
PubMed ID
30360881 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.