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Association between migraine, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136317
Source
J Headache Pain. 2011 Apr;12(2):157-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Han Le
Peer Tfelt-Hansen
Axel Skytthe
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Jes Olesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, The Danish Headache Centre, Glostrup Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Headache Pain. 2011 Apr;12(2):157-72
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Migraine with Aura - epidemiology
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sedentary lifestyle
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether sex-specific associations exist between migraine, lifestyle or socioeconomic factors. We distinguished between the subtypes migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO). In 2002, a questionnaire containing validated questions to diagnose migraine and questions on lifestyle and socioeconomic factors was sent to 46,418 twin individuals residing in Denmark. 31,865 twin individuals aged 20-71 were included. The twins are representative of the Danish population with regard to migraine and other somatic diseases and were used as such in the present study. An increased risk of migraine was significantly associated with lower level of schooling and education, retirement, unemployment, and smoking. A decreased risk of migraine was significantly associated with heavy physical exercise and intake of alcohol. Direct comparison between the subtypes showed a decreased risk of MA compared to MO in subjects with low education or weekly intake of alcohol. The risk of MA was increased compared to MO in unemployed or retired subjects. Direct comparison between sexes showed a decreased risk of migraine for men compared to women in subjects who were low educated, unemployed or studying. The risk was increased for men compared to women in subjects with heavy physical exercise, intake of alcohol, and body mass index >25. Migraine was associated with several lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Most associations such as low education and employment status were probably due to the negative effects of having migraine while others such as smoking were risk factors for migraine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21390550 View in PubMed
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Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Adiposity as Determinants of Metabolic Health-Pooled Analysis of Two Twin Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285680
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 May 01;102(5):1520-1528
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-01-2017
Author
Sakari Jukarainen
René Holst
Christine Dalgård
Päivi Piirilä
Jesper Lundbom
Antti Hakkarainen
Nina Lundbom
Aila Rissanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 May 01;102(5):1520-1528
Date
May-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Composition - genetics - physiology
Cardiorespiratory Fitness - physiology
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Cholesterol, LDL - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Electric Impedance
Female
Finland
Gene-Environment Interaction
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin Resistance - genetics - physiology
Intra-Abdominal Fat - diagnostic imaging
Linear Models
Liver - diagnostic imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - genetics - metabolism
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Oxygen Consumption - genetics - physiology
Triglycerides - metabolism
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
The joint effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and body composition on metabolic health are not well known.
To examine the associations of CRF, fat-free mass index (FFMI), and fat mass index (FMI) with metabolic health in individual twins and controlling for genetic and shared environmental effects by studying monozygotic intrapair differences.
Two cross-sectional samples of healthy adult monozygotic and dizygotic twins were drawn from population-based Danish and Finnish national twin registries (n = 996 and n = 309).
CRF was defined as VO2max divided by fat-free mass. Insulin sensitivity and acute insulin response indices were derived from an oral glucose tolerance test. A continuous metabolic syndrome score was calculated. Visceral and liver fat were measured in the Finnish sample. Associations were analyzed separately in both cohorts with multivariate linear regression and aggregated with meta-analytic methods.
Insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response, metabolic syndrome score, visceral, and liver fat amount had strong and statistically significant associations with FMI (
?
0.53 to 0.79), whereas their associations with CRF and FFMI were at most weak (
0.02 to 0.15). The results of the monozygotic intrapair differences analysis showed the same pattern.
Although FMI is strongly associated with worsening of metabolic health traits, even after controlling for genetic and shared environmental factors, there was little evidence for the effects of CRF or FFMI on metabolic health. This suggests that changing FMI rather than CRF or FFMI may affect metabolic health irrespective of genetic or early environmental determinants.
PubMed ID
28324016 View in PubMed
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Communication skills training increases self-efficacy of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123109
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(2):90-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Birgitte Nørgaard
Jette Ammentorp
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Poul-Erik Kofoed
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kolding Hospital, Denmark. birgitte.noergaard@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(2):90-7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Communication
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Denmark
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Organizational Objectives
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Abstract
Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training course for all staff members expecting an increase in patient-centeredness in communication and more respectful intercollegial communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of this training course on participants' self-efficacy with a focus on communication with both colleagues and patients.
The study was designed as an effectiveness study with the training course implemented in a real-world context. The staff members attended a 3-day training course in patient-centered communication and communication with colleagues. The effect of the training was evaluated by means of a questionnaire filled out before, immediately after, and 6 months after the course.
Of the 181 participants, 177 answered the questionnaire before, 165 immediately after, and 150 six months after the course. The mean score for self-efficacy in communication with patients increased from 6.68 to 7.88 (p
PubMed ID
22733636 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and type 2 diabetes: A nation-wide cohort twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272566
Source
Respir Med. 2015 Aug;109(8):1026-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Howraman Meteran
Vibeke Backer
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Axel Skytthe
Simon Francis Thomsen
Source
Respir Med. 2015 Aug;109(8):1026-30
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Twins
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and is associated with several systemic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that comorbidity between COPD and type 2 diabetes is due to shared genetic factors.
To examine the relationship between type 2 diabetes and chronic bronchitis and COPD in adult twins, and to examine to what extent comorbidity between these diseases is explained by shared genetic or environmental factors.
Questionnaire data on chronic bronchitis and hospital discharge data on diagnosed COPD in 13,649 twins, aged 50-71 years, from the Danish Twin Registry were cross-linked with hospital discharge diagnosis data on type 2 diabetes from the Danish National Patient Registry.
The risk of type 2 diabetes was higher in persons with symptoms of chronic bronchitis than in those without symptoms (3.5 vs. 2.3%), OR = 1.57 (1.10-2.26), p = 0.014, and in individuals with diagnosed COPD than in those without the diagnosis (6.6 vs. 2.3%), OR = 2.62 (1.63-4.2), p 
PubMed ID
26044811 View in PubMed
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Co-morbidity of migraine with somatic disease in a large population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100203
Source
Cephalalgia. 2011 Jan;31(1):43-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Han Le
Peer Tfelt-Hansen
Michael Bjørn Russell
Axel Skytthe
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Jes Olesen
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Cephalalgia. 2011 Jan;31(1):43-64
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine sex specific co-morbidity of migraine and its subtypes migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) with a number of common somatic diseases. Subjects and methods: In 2002, a questionnaire containing previously validated questions to diagnose migraine and its subtypes as well as questions regarding some somatic diseases was sent to 46,418 twins residing in Denmark and born between 1931 and 1982. The twins are representative of the whole Danish population and were used as such in the present study. Results: We found that 21, 23 and 12 conditions were co-morbid with migraine, MA and MO, respectively. Co-morbid diseases included previously documented diseases: asthma, epilepsy and stroke as well as new conditions: kidney stone, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia. MA had more co-morbidities than MO and females more than males. Conclusions: Migraine occurs in 20-30% of several medical conditions. It should be diagnosed and treated along with the primary disease.
PubMed ID
20974590 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity with low back pain: a cross-sectional population-based survey of 12- to 22-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13807
Source
Spine. 2004 Jul 1;29(13):1483-91; discussion 1492
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2004
Author
Lise Hestbaek
Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Werner Vach
Michael B Russell
Lars Skadhauge
Anders Svendsen
Claus Manniche
Author Affiliation
Back Research Center, Ringe, Denmark. hestbaek@vip.cybercity.dk
Source
Spine. 2004 Jul 1;29(13):1483-91; discussion 1492
Date
Jul-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Female
Headache - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based survey. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the pattern of comorbidity with low back pain in adolescents. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Low back pain is usually dealt with as a specific and independent entity. However, the existing literature shows comorbidity to be common with low back pain, suggesting that low back pain may be part of a broader pattern of general health. The present knowledge is based on studies of adult populations; therefore, associations could be explained by work and lifestyle factors. Information in this area is lacking regarding subjects still unaffected by such factors. METHODS: A questionnaire-survey about general health, including low back pain, was carried out among twins registered in the population-based Danish Twin Registry. Associations between disorders were calculated and patterns of comorbidity investigated, by means of logistic regression and a finite mixture model. Finally a twin-control study was conducted. RESULTS: A total of 9,567 individuals, 12 to 22 years of age, responded to the questionnaire. Positive associations between low back pain and asthma and headache/migraine were demonstrated, mainly because of study participants with several disorders. No association between low back pain and atopic dermatitis/hay fever was found. The presence of two other disorders increased the probability of low back pain considerably more than the presence of only one other disorder. The finite mixture model indicated that the probability of belonging to a frail subgroup decreased from 60% at age 13 to 25% at age 21, and in the frail subgroups nearly all report low back pain and headache in the older ages. Furthermore, increasing duration of low back pain increased the likelihood of having other disorders. Results from the twin-control study were similar. CONCLUSION: Young people are more likely to suffer from asthma and headache, but not from atopic dermatitis/hay fever, if they have low back pain. All of the investigated disorders cluster in some individuals. A model of common origin for these seemingly independent disorders should be considered.
PubMed ID
15223944 View in PubMed
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The course of low back pain from adolescence to adulthood: eight-year follow-up of 9600 twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76193
Source
Spine. 2006 Feb 15;31(4):468-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2006
Author
Lise Hestbaek
Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Claus Manniche
Author Affiliation
Back Research Center, Backcenter Fynen, Clinical Locomotion Science, University of Southern Denmark, Ringe, Denmark. kristianoglise@hotmail.com
Source
Spine. 2006 Feb 15;31(4):468-72
Date
Feb-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Medicine
Adult
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study with 8-year follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution of low back pain from adolescence into adulthood. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: High prevalence rates of low back pain among children and adolescents have been demonstrated in several studies, and it has been theorized that low back pain in childhood may have important consequences for future low back pain. It is important to understand the nature of such a link if effective preventive programs are to be established. METHODS: Almost 10,000 Danish twins born between 1972 and 1982 were surveyed by means of postal questionnaires in 1994 and again in 2002. The questionnaires dealt with various aspects of general health, including the prevalence of low back pain, classified according to number of days affected (0, 1-7, 8-30, >30). RESULTS: Low back pain in adolescence was found to be a significant risk factor for low back pain in adulthood with odds ratios as high as four. We also demonstrated a dose-response association: the more days with low back pain at baseline, the higher the risk of future low back pain. Twenty-six percent of those with low back pain for more than 30 days during the baseline year also had more than 30 days with low back pain during the follow-up year. This was true for only 9% of the rest of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: Our study clearly demonstrates correlations between low back pain in childhood/adolescence and low back pain in adulthood. This should lead to a change in focus from the adult to the young population in relation to research, prevention, and treatment.
PubMed ID
16481960 View in PubMed
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A Danish population-based twin study on autism spectrum disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114015
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;23(1):35-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Claudia Nordenbæk
Meta Jørgensen
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Odense, University of Southern Denmark, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000, Odense C, Denmark, claudia@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;23(1):35-43
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Checklist
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - ethnology - genetics
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Intelligence Tests - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Twins - genetics
Abstract
Genetic epidemiological studies of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) based on twin pairs ascertained from the population and thoroughly assessed to obtain a high degree of diagnostic validity are few. All twin pairs aged 3-14 years in the nationwide Danish Twin Registry were approached. A three-step procedure was used. Five items from the "Child Behaviour Checklist" (CBCL) were used in the first screening phase, while screening in the second phase included the "Social and Communication Questionnaire" and the "Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire". The final clinical assessment was based on "gold standard" diagnostic research procedures including diagnostic interview, observation and cognitive examination. Classification was based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. The initial sample included 7,296 same-sexed twin pairs and, after two phases of screening and clinical assessment, the final calculations were based on 36 pairs. The probandwise concordance rate for ASD was 95.2% in monozygotic (MZ) twins (n=13 pairs) and 4.3% in dizygotic (DZ) twins (n=23 pairs). The high MZ and low DZ concordance rate support a genetic aetiology to ASDs.
PubMed ID
23661220 View in PubMed
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Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Axel Skytthe
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Niels Vilstrup Holm
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Twin Registry, Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. askytthe@health.sdu.dk.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):75-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Introduction: The Danish Twin Registry is a unique source for studies of genetic, familial and environmental factors on life events, health conditions and diseases. Content: More than 85,000 twin pairs born 1870-2008 in Denmark. Validity and coverage: Four main ascertainment methods have been employed. Completeness of ascertainment varies according to birth cohorts. For birth cohorts 1870-1930 both twins should survive to age 6 years. From 1931-1968 72% of all twin pairs has been ascertained, with complete ascertainment of all live born twins since 1968. CONCLUSION: Because twins have been identified independent of traits and on a population basis, the Danish Twin Registry is well suited for studies to understand the influence of genetic and environmental factors for a wide variety of diseases and traits.
PubMed ID
21775358 View in PubMed
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The Danish Twin Registry: linking surveys, national registers, and biological information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119635
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2013 Feb;16(1):104-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Axel Skytthe
Lene Christiansen
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Frans L Bødker
Lars Hvidberg
Inge Petersen
Morten M F Nielsen
Paul Bingley
Jacob Hjelmborg
Qihua Tan
Niels V Holm
James W Vaupel
Matt McGue
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Twin Registry, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2013 Feb;16(1):104-11
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Registries
Twins - genetics
Abstract
Over the last 60 years, the resources and the research in the Danish Twin Registry (DTR) have periodically been summarized. Here, we give a short overview of the DTR and a more comprehensive description of new developments in the twenty-first century. First, we outline our experience over the last decade of combining questionnaire and survey data with national demographic, social, and health registers in Statistics Denmark. Second, we describe our most recent data collection effort, which was conducted during the period 2008-2011 and included both in-person assessments of 14,000+ twins born 1931-1969 and sampling of biological material, hereby expanding and consolidating the DTR biobank. Third, two examples of intensively studied twin cohorts are given. The new developments in the DTR in the last decade have facilitated the ongoing research and laid the groundwork for new research directions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23084092 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.