Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

Balancing: a basic process in end-of-life cancer care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18052
Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Dec;13(10):1353-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Hans Thulesius
Anders Håkansson
Kerstin Petersson
Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Dec;13(10):1353-77
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Female
Humans
Interviews
Male
Neoplasms - nursing
Palliative Care - psychology
Patient Care Planning
Problem Solving
Qualitative Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Terminal Care - psychology
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
In this grounded theory study, the authors interviewed caregivers and patients in end-of-life cancer care and found Balancing to be a fundamental process explaining the problem-solving strategies of most participants and offering a comprehensive perspective on both health care in general and end-of-life cancer care in particular. Balancing stages were Weighing--sensing needs and wishes signaled by patients, gauging them against caregiver resources in diagnosing and care planning; Shifting--breaking bad news, changing care places, and treatments; and Compensating--controlling symptoms, educating and team-working, prioritizing and "stretching" time, innovating care methods, improvising, and maintaining the homeostasis of hope. The Balancing outcome is characterized by Compromising, or "Walking a fine line," at best an optimized situation, at worst a deceit.
PubMed ID
14658351 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being Different but Striving to Seem Normal: The Lived Experiences of People Aged 50+ with ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312075
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2020 Jun; 41(6):476-485
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Anne Nyström
Kerstin Petersson
Ann-Christin Janlöv
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2020 Jun; 41(6):476-485
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology
Emotions
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
This qualitative study explored the day-to-day life of people aged 50+ diagnosed with ADHD. A phenomenological-hermeneutical method was chosen for the analysis. Two themes including sub-themes were revealed. The first theme, Being different and trying to handle my inner self, concerned emotional self-regulation, emotional resilience, social skills, and personal resource management. The second theme, Trying to adapt to fit in with people around me, concerned relationships, work, and personal finances. The comprehensive understanding was interpreted as Being different but striving to seem normal.
PubMed ID
32267788 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index and gestational weight gain in migrant women by birth regions compared with Swedish-born women: A registry linkage study of 0.5 million pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304351
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(10):e0241319
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Pontus Henriksson
Johanna Sandborg
Marie Blomberg
Paulina Nowicka
Kerstin Petersson
Marcus Bendtsen
Magdalena Rosell
Marie Löf
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(10):e0241319
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Female
Gestational Weight Gain
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - ethnology - physiopathology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology - ethnology
Thinness - epidemiology - ethnology - physiopathology
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
Women migrating to high-income countries may have increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes as compared with native-born women. However, little is known whether migrant women are more likely to have unhealthy body mass index (BMI) or gestational weight gain (GWG), which is of importance considering the well-established links between unhealthy BMI and GWG with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Hence, the aim of the study was to examine the prevalence and estimate odds ratios (ORs) of underweight and obesity in the first trimester as well as inadequate and excessive GWG across birth regions in migrant (first-generation) and Swedish-born women in a population-based sample of pregnant women in Sweden.
This population-based study included 535 609 pregnancies from the Swedish Pregnancy Register between the years 2010-2018. This register has a coverage of approximately 90% and includes data on body weight, height, birth country and educational attainment. BMI in the first trimester of pregnancy was classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity whereas GWG was classified as inadequate, adequate and excessive according to the recommendations from the National Academy of Medicine, USA. BMI and GWG were examined according to 7 birth regions and the 100 individual birth countries. Adjusted ORs of underweight, obesity as well as inadequate or excessive GWG by birth regions were estimated using multinomial logistic regression.
There were large disparities in unhealthy BMI and GWG across birth regions. For instance, women born in North Africa and Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa had 1.40 (95% CI 1.35-1.44) and 2.13 (95% CI 2.03-2.23) higher odds of obesity compared with women born in Sweden. However, women born in Sub-Saharan Africa had also considerably higher odds of underweight (OR, 2.93 [95% CI 2.70-3.18]) and inadequate GWG (OR, 1.97 [95% CI 1.87-2.07]). The limitations of the study include the lack of a validated measure of acculturation and that the study only had data on first-generation migration.
The large differences across the 7 regions and 100 countries highlights the importance of considering birth region and country-specific risks of unhealthy BMI and GWG in first-generation migrant women. Furthermore, inadequate GWG was common among pregnant first-generation migrant women, especially in women born in Sub-Saharan Africa, which demonstrates the need to promote adequate GWG, not only the avoidance of excessive GWG. Thus, our findings also indicate that additional support and interventions may be needed for first-generation migrant women from certain birth regions and countries in order to tackle the observed disparities in unhealthy BMI and GWG. Although further studies are needed, our results are useful for identifying groups of women at increased risk of unhealthy BMI and weight gain during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
33119672 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes in Sweden - a stepped wedge national cluster randomised controlled trial - the CDC4G study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308385
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Nov 01; 19(1):398
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Nov-01-2019
Author
Helena Fadl
Maryam Saeedi
Scott Montgomery
Anders Magnuson
Erik Schwarcz
Kerstin Berntorp
Verena Sengpiel
Elisabeth Storck-Lindholm
Helena Strevens
Anna-Karin Wikström
Sophia Brismar-Wendel
Martina Persson
Stefan Jansson
Fredrik Ahlsson
Carina Ursing
Linda Ryen
Kerstin Petersson
Ulla-Britt Wennerholm
Karin Hildén
David Simmons
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. Helena.fadl@regionorebrolan.se.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Nov 01; 19(1):398
Date
Nov-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Diagnosis - standards
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
The optimal criteria to diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remain contested. The Swedish National Board of Health introduced the 2013 WHO criteria in 2015 as a recommendation for initiation of treatment for hyperglycaemia during pregnancy. With variation in GDM screening and diagnostic practice across the country, it was agreed that the shift to new guidelines should be in a scientific and structured way. The aim of the Changing Diagnostic Criteria for Gestational Diabetes (CDC4G) in Sweden ( www.cdc4g.se/en ) is to evaluate the clinical and health economic impacts of changing diagnostic criteria for GDM in Sweden and to create a prospective cohort to compare the many long-term outcomes in mother and baby under the old and new diagnostic approaches.
This is a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial, comparing pregnancy outcomes before and after the switch in GDM criteria across 11 centres in a randomised manner. The trial includes all pregnant women screened for GDM across the participating centres during January-December 2018, approximately two thirds of all pregnancies in Sweden in a year. Women with pre-existing diabetes will be excluded. Data will be collected through the national Swedish Pregnancy register and for follow up studies other health registers will be included.
The stepped wedge RCT was chosen to be the best study design for evaluating the shift from old to new diagnostic criteria of GDM in Sweden. The national quality registers provide data on the whole pregnant population and gives a possibility for follow up studies of both mother and child. The health economic analysis from the study will give a solid evidence base for future changes in order to improve immediate pregnancy, as well as long term, outcomes for mother and child.
CDC4G is listed on the ISRCTN registry with study ID ISRCTN41918550 (15/12/2017).
PubMed ID
31675922 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experiences of physical activity during pregnancy in Danish nulliparous women with a physically active life before pregnancy. A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142567
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2010;10:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Hanne K Hegaard
Hanne Kjaergaard
Peter P Damm
Kerstin Petersson
Anna-Karin Dykes
Author Affiliation
The Unit of Caring Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden. Hanne.Hegaard@rh.regionh.dk
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2010;10:33
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Life Style
Parity
Pregnancy - physiology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Abstract
National guidelines recommend that healthy pregnant women take 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise a day. Most women reduce the level of physical activity during pregnancy but only a few studies of women's experiences of physical activity during pregnancy exist. The aim of the present study was to elucidate experiences and views of leisure time physical activity during pregnancy in nulliparous women who were physically active prior to their pregnancy.
A qualitative study was conducted by means of personal interviews. Nineteen women, all with a moderate pre-pregnancy level of physical activity but with different levels of physical activity during pregnancy, participated in the study. Content analysis was applied.
In the analyses of experiences and views of physical activities during pregnancy, four categories and nine sub-categories were developed: Physical activity as a lifestyle (Habit and Desire to continue), Body awareness (Pregnancy-related discomfort, Having a complicated pregnancy and A growing body), Carefulness (Feelings of worry and Balancing worry and sense of security) and Sense of benefit (Feelings of happiness and Physical well-being).
As other studies have also shown, women find that the discomfort and complications associated with pregnancy, the growing body, and a sense of insecurity with physical activity are barriers to maintaining former levels of physical activity. This study adds a new perspective by describing women's perceptions of these barriers and of overcoming them--thus, when pregnant, the majority of the women do not cease to be physically active but continue to be so. Barriers are overcome by applying one's own experience, looking to role models, mirroring the activities of other pregnant women and following the advice of experts (midwives/physiotherapists). Women then continue to be physically active during pregnancy, most often to a lesser extent or in alternative activities, and derive considerable enjoyment and physical well-being from this.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiology. 2002 Nov;13(6):653-912410006
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2010 Apr;25(2):282-9319039099
Cites: Can J Appl Physiol. 2003 Aug;28(4):642-5312904639
Cites: J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2003 Jun;13(6):385-9312962263
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2004 Mar-Apr;49(2):138-4415010667
Cites: Midwifery. 2004 Jun;20(2):133-4115177856
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2004 Sep;41(7):755-6515288798
Cites: Circulation. 1968 Dec;38(6):1104-155721960
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 1991 Dec;11(6):461-61775125
Cites: Birth. 1992 Jun;19(2):64-811388434
Cites: Birth. 1993 Sep;20(3):136-418240621
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1996 Jan;6(1):53-98680626
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Mar;78(3):180-510078577
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2004 Nov;66(2):203-1515533588
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Oct;37(10):1748-5316260976
Cites: Sports Med. 2006;36(1):19-3816445309
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2007 Apr;32(4):312-917383562
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(5):559-6417464584
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1423-3417762377
Cites: BJOG. 2007 Nov;114(11):1419-2617877774
Cites: Br Dent J. 2008 Apr 26;204(8):429-3218438371
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2009 May;13(3):364-7518478322
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2001 Mar;5(1):7-1411341722
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2002 Apr;77(1):79-8112053898
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(4):402-719330572
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Aug;25(4):430-818063253
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009 Oct;19(5):637-4518627550
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Dec;25(6):682-9018222576
Cites: Hypertension. 2003 Jun;41(6):1273-8012719446
PubMed ID
20584333 View in PubMed
Less detail

General parental education in Sweden: participants and non-participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30972
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Mar;21(1):43-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Christer Petersson
Kerstin Petersson
Anders Håkansson
Author Affiliation
Kronoberg Unit for Research and Development, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Mar;21(1):43-6
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Parents - education
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study factors of importance for participation in parental education within routine child health care. DESIGN: All parents of children born during 1 year were invited by the district nurse to participate in parental education; their participation during the infant year was registered. SETTING: Catchment area of two health centres in Växjö, Sweden. SUBJECTS: 221 infants and their parents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of educational sessions for mothers and fathers. RESULTS: 63% of mothers and 20% of fathers attended at least one session. These mothers attended a mean of 5.7 (SD 2.2) sessions and these fathers a mean of 2.8 (SD 2.3) sessions. Logistic regression analyses showed that the only variable of significance for participation was being a first-time parent (odds ratio 3.9 for the mothers and 3.7 for the fathers). Odds ratios above 2.0 (non-significant) were found for married mothers and Swedish mothers, as well as for Swedish fathers. CONCLUSION: It is still a considerable problem to get certain groups involved in routine parental education in Swedish child healthcare programmes.
PubMed ID
12718460 View in PubMed
Less detail

High weight gain during pregnancy increases the risk for emergency caesarean section - Population-based data from the Swedish Maternal Health Care Register 2011-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283519
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Mar;11:47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Carin Nilses
Margareta Persson
Marie Lindkvist
Kerstin Petersson
Ingrid Mogren
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Mar;11:47-52
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elective Surgical Procedures
Emergency Treatment
Female
Humans
Maternal health
Maternal health services
Obesity - complications
Overweight - complications
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Reference Values
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
The aim was to investigate maternal background factors' significance in relation to risk of elective and emergency caesarean sections (CS) in Sweden.
Population-based, retrospective, cross-sectional study. The Swedish Maternal Health Care Register (MHCR) is a national quality register that collects data on pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period. All women registered in MHCR 2011 to 2012 were included in the study sample (N?=?178,716).
The risk of elective and emergency caesarean section in relation to age, parity, education, country of origin, weight in early pregnancy and weight gain during pregnancy was calculated in logistic regression models.
Multiparous women demonstrated a doubled risk of elective CS compared to primiparous women, but their risk for emergency CS was halved. Overweight and obesity at enrolment in antenatal care increased the risk for emergency CS, irrespective of parity. Weight gain above recommended international levels (Institute of Medicine, IOM) during pregnancy increased the risk for emergency CS for women with normal weight, overweight or obesity.
There is a need of national guidelines on recommended weight gain during pregnancy in Sweden. We suggest that the usefulness of the IOM guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy should be evaluated in the Swedish context.
PubMed ID
28159128 View in PubMed
Less detail

Internal validity of the Swedish Maternal Health Care Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262696
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:364
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kerstin Petersson
Margareta Persson
Marie Lindkvist
Margareta Hammarström
Carin Nilses
Ingrid Haglund
Yvonne Skogsdal
Ingrid Mogren
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:364
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Maternal health services
Medical Records
Pregnancy
Registries - standards
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Maternal Health Care Register (MHCR) is a national quality register that has been collecting pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum data since 1999. A substantial revision of the MHCR resulted in a Web-based version of the register in 2010. Although MHCR provides data for health care services and research, the validity of the MHCR data has not been evaluated. This study investigated degree of coverage and internal validity of specific variables in the MHCR and identified possible systematic errors.
This cross-sectional observational study compared pregnancy and delivery data in medical records with corresponding data in the MHCR. The medical record was considered the gold standard. The medical records from nine Swedish hospitals were selected for data extraction. This study compared data from 878 women registered in both medical records and in the MHCR. To evaluate the quality of the initial data extraction, a second data extraction of 150 medical records was performed. Statistical analyses were performed for degree of coverage, agreement and correlation of data, and sensitivity and specificity.
Degree of coverage of specified variables in the MHCR varied from 90.0% to 100%. Identical information in both medical records and the MHCR ranged from 71.4% to 99.7%. For more than half of the investigated variables, 95% or more of the information was identical. Sensitivity and specificity were analysed for binary variables. Probable systematic errors were identified for two variables.
When comparing data from medical records and data registered in the MHCR, most variables in the MHCR demonstrated good to very good degree of coverage, agreement, and internal validity. Hence, data from the MHCR may be regarded as reliable for research as well as for evaluating, planning, and decision-making with respect to Swedish maternal health care services.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;30(4):853-6211511616
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 15;154(10):889-9011700241
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):143-82367825
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Sep;132(3):446-522389749
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1991 Sep;19(3):145-71796245
Cites: Am J Perinatol. 1998 Jul;15(7):453-99759914
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Feb;10(1):85-9410334647
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2006 Jun;93(3):269-7416626716
Cites: Midwifery. 2010 Dec;26(6):596-60219250723
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2012 Feb;19(2):217-2722320373
Cites: Med Care. 2012 Apr;50(4):e7-2021617569
Cites: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;56(5):452-6023181642
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2012 Oct 17-23;109(42):1872-323193932
PubMed ID
25175811 View in PubMed
Less detail

Learner-centred education in end-of-life care improved well being in home care staff: a prospective controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45984
Source
Palliat Med. 2002 Jul;16(4):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Hans Thulesius
Christer Petersson
Kerstin Petersson
Anders Håkansson
Author Affiliation
Kronoberg County Research Centre and Department of Community Medicine, Malmö, Sweden. hans.thulesius@ltkronoberg.se
Source
Palliat Med. 2002 Jul;16(4):347-54
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Depression - etiology
Education, Medical - methods
Group Processes
Health Personnel - education
Health status
Home Care Services
Humans
Mental health
Middle Aged
Problem-Based Learning
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Staff Development
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this controlled study was to evaluate a 1-year learner-centred educational project in end-of-life care for home care staff in a rural district of Sweden. Another rural district in the same region served as a control area. A 20-item questionnaire measuring attitudes towards end-of-life care was designed, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale was used to measure mental well being. Increased agreement to 18 of 20 attitude statements was seen in the education group, while 2 of 20 items showed a decreased agreement in the control group. Test-retest reliability of the 20-item questionnaire was good (r=0.92). The total HAD score decreased from 8.3 pretest to 5.3 post-test in the education group (95% CI = 2.1 -3.7; P
PubMed ID
12132548 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal height and risk of caesarean section in singleton births in Sweden-A population-based study using data from the Swedish Pregnancy Register 2011 to 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296190
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198124
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ingrid Mogren
Maria Lindqvist
Kerstin Petersson
Carin Nilses
Rhonda Small
Gabriel Granåsen
Kristina Edvardsson
Author Affiliation
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198124
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Body Height
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Mothers
Parturition
Pregnancy
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Caesarean section (CS) has short and long term adverse health consequences, and should therefore only be undertaken when necessary. Risk factors such as maternal age, maternal body mass index (BMI) and fetal weight have been extensively investigated in relation to CS, but the significance of maternal height has been less explored in Sweden. The aim was to investigate the significance of maternal height on risk of CS in a representative, population-based sample from Sweden, also taking into account confounders. Data on singleton births in the Swedish Pregnancy Register 2011 to 2016 were collected, including women with heights of 140 cm and above, constituting a sample of 581,844 women. Data were analysed with epidemiological and biostatistical methods. Mean height was 166.1 cm. Women born outside Sweden were significantly shorter than women born in Sweden (162.8 cm vs. 167.1 cm, p
Notes
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1998 Oct;92(4 Pt 1):501-6 PMID 9764619
Cites: J R Soc Med. 2003 Nov;96(11):559-61 PMID 14594971
Cites: Am J Phys Anthropol. 1962 Dec;20:515-7 PMID 14015261
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1992 Sep;99(9):709-10 PMID 1420006
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2014 Aug 30;14:364 PMID 25175811
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Feb;103(2):219-24 PMID 14754687
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Nov;213(5):700.e1-9 PMID 26187451
Cites: J Pediatr. 2016 Apr;171:38-42.e1-4 PMID 26825289
Cites: Lancet. 1985 Aug 24;2(8452):436-7 PMID 2863457
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Oct;110(4):759-64 PMID 17906006
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Apr 21;11(4):e0154304 PMID 27100080
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Apr;97(4):466-476 PMID 29172245
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2016 Mar;74(3):149-65 PMID 26928678
Cites: Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today. 2004 Dec;72(4):300-12 PMID 15662709
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2012 Aug;34(8):721-746 PMID 22947405
Cites: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2009 Aug;49(4):388-92 PMID 19694693
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013 Feb 05;13:33 PMID 23383756
Cites: Transl Res. 2017 Jan;179:60-70 PMID 27469270
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013 Jan 30;13:27 PMID 23360183
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Apr;94(4):368-75 PMID 25581307
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:i-xii, 1-253 PMID 11234459
Cites: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 1999 May;39(2):152-4 PMID 10755767
Cites: BJOG. 2001 Jul;108(7):689-96 PMID 11467692
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Oct;209(4):349.e1-6 PMID 23727520
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jun 15;(6):CD005528 PMID 21678348
Cites: Elife. 2016 Jul 26;5: PMID 27458798
Cites: Paediatr Respir Rev. 2013 Mar;14(1):29-36; quiz 36-7 PMID 23347658
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Dec 10;(12):CD004224 PMID 24323886
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 May;97(5):615-623 PMID 29450878
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2017 May;31(3):198-205 PMID 28317131
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Feb;107(2 Pt 1):227-33 PMID 16449105
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):858-63 PMID 15155701
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2014 Dec 10;14:613 PMID 25491418
Cites: BMJ. 1988 Aug 20-27;297(6647):515-7 PMID 3139180
Cites: PLoS Med. 2015 Aug 18;12(8):e1001865 PMID 26284790
Cites: Semin Perinatol. 2010 Aug;34(4):281-92 PMID 20654779
Cites: J Biosoc Sci. 2017 May;49(3):392-407 PMID 27692008
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1994 Jan;84(1):37-42 PMID 8279609
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol. 2002 Sep;22(5):513-5 PMID 12521419
Cites: Reprod Health. 2015 Jun 21;12:57 PMID 26093498
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 1996 Jun;53(3):219-33 PMID 8793624
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(6):e20497 PMID 21738577
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1987;66(2):153-8 PMID 3618140
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 Nov 22;16(1):365 PMID 27876014
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2009 Apr;35(2):307-14 PMID 19335797
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Apr;39(4):633-41 PMID 25640766
Cites: Arch Gynecol Obstet. 1995;256(2):67-74 PMID 7611821
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Mar 14;(3):CD004660 PMID 22419296
Cites: J Anesth. 2016 Apr;30(2):268-73 PMID 26585767
Cites: BJOG. 2007 Mar;114(3):319-24 PMID 17261123
PubMed ID
29813118 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.