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Association between insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) polymorphisms, circulating IGF-I, and pre- and postnatal growth in two European small for gestational age populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30688
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Oct;88(10):4805-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Linda B Johnston
Jovanna Dahlgren
Juliane Leger
Lars Gelander
Martin O Savage
Paul Czernichow
Kerstin Albertsson Wikland
Adrian J L Clark
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Barts and the London Queen Mary School of Medicine, University of London, London, United Kingdom. l.b.johnston@qmul.ac.uk
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Oct;88(10):4805-10
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
France
Gestational Age
Haplotypes
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - growth & development - physiology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - genetics - metabolism
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the association of IGF-I and birth size by studying small for gestational age (SGA) subphenotypes and undertaking more detailed analysis of IGF-I genetic markers. SGA subjects from Haguenau, France (n = 113), and Gothenburg, Sweden (n = 174), were studied. The Swedish subjects were subphenotyped according to postnatal growth (114 short SGA and 60 SGA catch-up). IGF-I dinucleotide repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were studied, and haplotypes were generated in the Swedish short SGA group by identity of state. Association analysis was undertaken using the Monte Carlo method of association analysis of multiallelic markers for dinucleotide repeat markers, by exact chi(2) analysis for SNPs and by ANOVA for serum IGF-I levels. IGF-I genotype was associated with the SGA phenotype, in particular with symmetrical SGA and low birth weight, and with IGF-I levels in SGA subjects. Association with postnatal growth was different in the two populations, which may reflect the power of the smaller subphenotype groups. Haplotype analysis in the Swedish short SGA subjects showed that the region of association lay between the promoter and intron 2 of the IGF-I gene. These studies validate the association of the IGF-I gene with birth size and refine the region of association in Swedish short SGA subjects.
PubMed ID
14557458 View in PubMed
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Body size and lifestyle in an urban population entering adulthood: the 'Grow up Gothenburg' study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124485
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Sep;101(9):964-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Agneta Sjöberg
Marie-Louise Barrenäs
Ebba Brann
John Eric Chaplin
Jovanna Dahlgren
Staffan Mårild
Lauren Lissner
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden. agneta.sjoberg@gu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Sep;101(9):964-72
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Body Image
Body Size
Body Weight
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Self Concept
Sleep
Sweden
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
To present data on body size, lifestyle and health status in students in their final year in high schools in Gothenburg area, Sweden, with specific attention to origin and gender.
Weight, height and waist circumference were measured by standardized procedures. Self-administered questionnaires described dietary habits, sleep, physical activity, body image, country of origin and general health.
Eighty-six percent of participants, (2600 girls, 2714 boys, mean age 18.6 years) were of Nordic origin, 86% reported no chronic health problems and 14%/19% of girls/boys were overweight or obese. Girls consumed more vegetables and fruits and fewer sweet drinks than boys, while breakfast consumption was most common in Nordic groups. Boys reported more positive answers than girls regarding body image. Nordic girls had more negative body image and higher morbidity compared with other groups.
Within this generally healthy cohort, boys were more likely to be overweight/obese than girls, although paradoxically boys were more satisfied with their appearance. Nordic girls constitute a group with particularly high risk of reporting low body self-esteem and chronic morbidity. In the longer term, the current cross-sectional data on body size, lifestyle and health will provide important baseline information for future follow-up studies of health outcomes in later life.
PubMed ID
22577752 View in PubMed
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Declining Well-Being in Young Swedes Born in 1990 Versus 1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289962
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Mar; 60(3):306-312
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Ebba Brann
John E Chaplin
Monica Leu Agelii
Agneta Sjöberg
Aimon Niklasson
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: ebba.brann@gu.se.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Mar; 60(3):306-312
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Body Height
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Self Concept
Self Report
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
Well-being is affected by the environment, including societal changes. In this study, specific dimensions of well-being were compared in two cohorts of Swedish adolescents born 16 years apart.
Two groups of 18-year-olds, "Grow up Gothenburg" 1974 and 1990 birth cohorts, completed a self-reported questionnaire including the Gothenburg Well-Being in adolescence scale (GWBa). In addition, height and weight were measured, resulting in 4,362 participants (1974 birth cohort) and 5,151 participants (1990 birth cohort) with age, height, weight, and well-being data. The GWBa consists of a total score and five dimensions: mood, physical condition, energy, self-esteem, and stress balance.
Total well-being was significantly lower in the later-born cohort, and the greatest difference was seen for the dimension stress balance (feeling calm, unconcerned, unstressed, and relaxed), although effect sizes were modest. In both boys and girls, well-being was lower for all dimensions in the later-born cohort, with the exception of Self-esteem in girls, which was higher in the later-born cohort. In both cohorts, boys reported higher well-being than girls for all dimensions. The mean body mass index z-score was higher in boys from the later-born cohort, but after adjusting for weight status, the differences in well-being between the cohorts persisted.
Well-being was lower in the later-born cohort, particularly for the dimension stress balance. Differences were not explained by the shift in weight status indicating that other societal changes have had an impact on well-being levels. Managing high levels of stress might be an area of intervention in adolescents for improved well-being.
PubMed ID
27993460 View in PubMed
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Source
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Dec;15 Suppl 5:1243-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Johan Karlberg
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Chi Wai Kwan
Flora Y S Chan
Author Affiliation
Clinical Trials Centre, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong. Hong Kong SAR, PR China. jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hk
Source
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Dec;15 Suppl 5:1243-55
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Growth
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We explored factors related to early catch-up growth in healthy children in Göteborg, Sweden. Most (82.9%) infants born small for gestational age (SGA) showed catch-up growth during their first 6 months, and 94.3% reached a final height within the normal range. At 6 months, 21 SGA children remained short and 45 non-SGA babies fell below the -2 SDS cutoff in height. Of these 66 short infants, 10 (15.2%) remained short into adulthood and 56 showed spontaneous catch-up growth. Fetal growth should be defined by body size at 6 months of age rather than at birth because most SGA infants catch up before 6 months, and furthermore, fetal growth regulatory mechanisms, such as insulin-like growth factor-I and -II, are the primary growth-promoting factors until 6 months of age.
PubMed ID
12510975 View in PubMed
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Evaluating the predictive ability of childhood body mass index classification systems for overweight and obesity at 18 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271133
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Dec;43(8):802-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Ebba Brann
Agneta Sjöberg
John E Chaplin
Monica Leu
Kirsten Mehlig
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Lauren Lissner
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Dec;43(8):802-9
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Overweight - diagnosis
Pediatric Obesity - diagnosis
Predictive value of tests
Reference Standards
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the performance of three childhood body mass index classification systems defining weight status at age 10, for predicting overweight and obesity at 18 years, according to the World Health Organization adult body mass index classification.
Weight and height of 4235 Swedish girls and boys were measured both at around ages 10 and 18 years. Predictive ability of the extended International Obesity Task Force body mass index cut-offs (2012), the World Health Organization body mass index-for-age (2007) and a Swedish body mass index reference (2001) were assessed for sensitivity and specificity.
For predicting overweight including obesity at 18 years, the World Health Organization 2007 and the Swedish body mass index reference 2001 had similar sensitivity, 68% and 71%. The International Obesity Task Force 2012 had a significantly lower sensitivity, 53%. Specificity was 82-91% and highest for International Obesity Task Force 2012. For predicting obesity, the sensitivity for International Obesity Task Force 2012 was 29%, significantly lower than for the other two, 63% and 70%. Specificity was 94-100%, and highest for International Obesity Task Force 2012.
In situations when optimal screening sensitivity is required for identifying as many high-risk children as possible, the World Health Organization 2007 and the Swedish body mass index reference 2001 performed better than the International Obesity Task Force 2012. However, it is important to keep in mind that the International Obesity Task Force 2012 will identify the fewest false positives.
PubMed ID
26249838 View in PubMed
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Growth hormone (GH) dose-dependent IGF-I response relates to pubertal height gain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274993
Source
BMC Endocr Disord. 2015;15:84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Elena Lundberg
Berit Kriström
Bjorn Jonsson
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Source
BMC Endocr Disord. 2015;15:84
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Growth - drug effects
Growth Disorders - drug therapy - physiopathology
Human Growth Hormone - administration & dosage - blood - secretion
Humans
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Male
Puberty - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Responsiveness to GH treatment can be estimated by both growth and ?IGF-I. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate if mimicking the physiological increase during puberty in GH secretion, by using a higher GH dose could lead to pubertal IGFs in short children with low GH secretion. The secondary aim was to explore the relationship between IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and the IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio and gain in height.
A multicentre, randomized, clinical trial (TRN88-177) in 104 children (90 boys), who had received GH 33 µg/kg/day during at least 1 prepubertal year. They were followed from GH start to adult height (mean, 7.5 years; range, 4.6-10.7). At onset of puberty, children were randomized into three groups, to receive 67 µg/kg/day (GH(67)) given once (GH(67x1); n?=?30) or divided into two daily injection (GH(33x2); n?=?36), or to remain on a single 33 µg/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n?=?38). The outcome measures were change and obtained mean on-treatment IGF-I(SDS), IGFBP3(SDS) and IGF-I/IGFBP3 ratio(SDS) during prepuberty and puberty. These variables were assessed in relation to prepubertal, pubertal and total gain in heightSDS.
Mean prepubertal increases 1 year after GH start were: 2.1 IGF-I(SDS), 0.6 IGFBP3(SDS) and 1.5 IGF-I/IGFBP3ratio(SDS). A significant positive correlation was found between prepubertal ?IGFs and both prepubertal and total gain in height(SDS). During puberty changes in IGFs were GH dose-dependent: mean pubertal level of IGF-I(SDS) was higher in GH(67) vs GH(33) (p?=?0.031). First year pubertal ?IGF-I(SDS) was significantly higher in the GH(67)vs GH(33) group (0.5 vs -0.1, respectively, p?=?0.007), as well as ?IGF-I(SDS) to the pubertal mean level (0.2 vs -0.2, p?=?0.028). In multivariate analyses, the prepubertal increase in '?IGF-I(SDS) from GH start' and the 'GH dose-dependent pubertal ?IGF-I(SDS)' were the most important variables for explaining variation in prepubertal (21 %), pubertal (26 %) and total (28 %) gain in height(SDS).
TRN 88-177, not applicable 1988.
The dose-dependent change in IGFs was related to a dose-dependent pubertal gain in height(SDS). The attempt to mimic normal physiology by giving a higher GH dose during puberty was associated with both an increase in IGF-I and a dose-dependent gain in height(SDS).
Notes
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PubMed ID
26682747 View in PubMed
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Growth in early life and its relation to pubertal growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31217
Source
Epidemiology. 2003 Jan;14(1):65-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Zhong Cheng Luo
Yin Bun Cheung
Qing He
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Johan Karlberg
Author Affiliation
Clinical Trials Centre and Department of Pediatrics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, The P R China.
Source
Epidemiology. 2003 Jan;14(1):65-73
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent - physiology
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Child
Child Development - physiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Puberty - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The timing and magnitude of pubertal growth in relation to fetal, infancy and childhood growth have not been explored. METHODS: We used data from a longitudinal growth study of 3650 full-term healthy children who were born in Gothenburg, Sweden in 1973-1975. This analysis included 2738 children with height and weight measurements available both in early life and during adolescence. RESULTS: We found that faster linear growth during infancy and childhood was associated with earlier peak height velocity during adolescence. In contrast, greater height and body mass index (BMI) at birth were associated with later peak height velocity in adolescence. Children with faster linear growth and greater BMI in infancy and childhood had less height gain between ages 8 and 18. However, greater height and BMI at birth were associated with more height gain between ages 8 and 18 after adjusting for height and BMI in childhood. CONCLUSIONS: Both length and BMI (at birth, in infancy and during childhood) are associated with the timing and magnitude of pubertal growth. Being small at birth is associated with early puberty and a reduced height gain during adolescence.
PubMed ID
12500048 View in PubMed
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Growth in very preterm children: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30784
Source
Pediatr Res. 2003 Dec;54(6):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Aimon Niklasson
Eva Engstrom
Anna-Lena Hard
Kerstin Albertsson Wikland
Ann Hellstrom
Author Affiliation
Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Centre, Department of Pediatrics, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, S-416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. aimon.niklasson@vgregion.se
Source
Pediatr Res. 2003 Dec;54(6):899-905
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - growth & development
Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The knowledge about the long-term growth of very preterm children in relation to gestational age at birth is incomplete. Therefore, a retrospective study of longitudinal growth from birth to 7 y of age in 52 of 56 surviving children who were born at a gestational age of
PubMed ID
12930904 View in PubMed
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Improved final height with long-term growth hormone treatment in Noonan syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29423
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Sep;94(9):1232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Deborah Osio
Jovanna Dahlgren
Kerstin Albertsson Wikland
Otto Westphal
Author Affiliation
Göteborg Paediatric Growth Research Centre, Department of Paediatrics, Institute for the Health of Women and Children, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Sep;94(9):1232-7
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - drug effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Growth Hormone - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Male
Noonan Syndrome - drug therapy
Puberty - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIM: To assess whether children with Noonan syndrome on long-term growth hormone (GH) therapy improve their final height to near mid-parental height. METHODS: Twenty-five prepubertal children (13 girls) with Noonan syndrome (NS) were studied. A single clinician made the diagnosis based on clinical criteria. GH treatment started at an age ranging from 3.1 to 13.8 y and was continued for at least 2 y. Improvement or "gain" in final height (FH) was defined as either the difference between adult height SD scores (SDS) and pre-treatment height SDS (the childhood component of the Swedish reference) or height SDS compared to the Noonan reference. RESULTS: Ten children received a GH dose of 33 microg/kg/d (mean age at start 7.7+/-2.1 y, mean age at stop 17.6+/-1.7 y) and 15 received a dose of 66 microg/kg/d (mean age at start 8.6+/-3.3 y, mean age at stop 18.4+/-2.1 y). Eighteen out of 25 patients reached FH. A substantial improvement in FH of 1.7 SDS, equivalent to 10.4 cm compared to pre-treatment height, was observed. No significant difference was seen between the two GH doses. Females gained a mean height of 9.8 cm and males 1-13 cm (FH 174.5+/-7.8 cm vs mean adult height of 162.5+/-5.4 cm for males with NS) at final height. Moreover, 60% reached a mid-parental height of+/-1 SD. CONCLUSION: GH treatment improves final height in patients with Noonan syndrome, with a mean gain of 1.7 SDS. The prepubertal height gain is maintained to final height and the children achieve a height close to their mid-parental height.
PubMed ID
16203673 View in PubMed
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Improvements in behaviour and self-esteem following growth hormone treatment in short prepubertal children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137227
Source
Horm Res Paediatr. 2011;75(4):291-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
John Eric Chaplin
Berit Kriström
Björn Jonsson
Bruno Hägglöf
Torsten Tuvemo
A Stefan Aronson
Jovanna Dahlgren
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Author Affiliation
Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Center, Institute of Clinical Science, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Horm Res Paediatr. 2011;75(4):291-303
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect - drug effects
Attention - drug effects
Body Height - drug effects
Child
Child Behavior - drug effects
Child Behavior Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Child, Preschool
Depression - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Growth Disorders - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Human Growth Hormone - administration & dosage - deficiency - therapeutic use
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Parents
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To evaluate effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment on behaviour and psychosocial characteristics in short-stature children.
99 referred prepubertal non-familiar short-stature children (32 GH deficiency; 67 idiopathic short stature) aged 3-11 years, randomized to fixed or individual GH doses and their parents completed questionnaires (Child Behaviour Checklist, Birleson Depression Self-Report Scale, Abbreviated Parent-Teacher Questionnaire, I Think I Am, Well-Being Visual-Analogue Scales for Short-Stature Children) at baseline (BL) and after 3, 12, and 24 months.
At BL, children showed higher levels of internalizing behaviour (p
PubMed ID
21304250 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.