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Common variants in human CRC genes as low-risk alleles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98081
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Simone Picelli
Pawel Zajac
Xiao-Lei Zhou
David Edler
Claes Lenander
Johan Dalén
Fredrik Hjern
Nils Lundqvist
Ulrik Lindforss
Lars Påhlman
Kennet Smedh
Anders Törnqvist
Jörn Holm
Martin Janson
Magnus Andersson
Susanne Ekelund
Louise Olsson
Joakim Lundeberg
Annika Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penetrance
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) has been estimated to be around 35% and yet high-penetrance germline mutations found so far explain less than 5% of all cases. Much of the remaining variations could be due to the co-inheritance of multiple low penetrant variants. The identification of all the susceptibility alleles could have public health relevance in the near future. To test the hypothesis that what are considered polymorphisms in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles, we selected eight common SNPs for a pilot association study in 1785 cases and 1722 controls. One SNP, rs3219489:G>C (MUTYH Q324H) seemed to confer an increased risk of rectal cancer in homozygous status (OR=1.52; CI=1.06-2.17). When the analysis was restricted to our 'super-controls', healthy individuals with no family history for cancer, also rs1799977:A>G (MLH1 I219V) was associated with an increased risk in both colon and rectum patients with an odds ratio of 1.28 (CI=1.02-1.60) and 1.34 (CI=1.05-1.72), respectively (under the dominant model); while 2 SNPs, rs1800932:A>G (MSH6 P92P) and rs459552:T>A (APC D1822V) seemed to confer a protective effect. The latter, in particular showed an odds ratio of 0.76 (CI=0.60-0.97) among colon patients and 0.73 (CI=0.56-0.95) among rectal patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that common variants in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles.
PubMed ID
20149637 View in PubMed
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Preoperative management is more important than choice of sutured or stapled anastomosis in Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61664
Source
Eur J Surg. 2002;168(3):154-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Kennet Smedh
Mats Andersson
Hans Johansson
Thorsten Hagberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Uppsala University, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden. kennet.smedh@ltvastmanland.se
Source
Eur J Surg. 2002;168(3):154-7
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anastomosis, Surgical
Case-Control Studies
Crohn Disease - surgery
Enteral Nutrition
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Preoperative Care
Prospective Studies
Surgical Stapling
Suture Techniques
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To find out if there were any differences in postoperative complications and anastomotic leak rate between sutured and stapled anastomoses after bowel resection in patients exposed to the same preoperative management programme. DESIGN: Prospective observational non-randomised study. SETTING: Colorectal unit, Sweden. PATIENTS: Between 1996 and 2000 bowel resections with anastomosis were done for 42 consecutive patients with Crohn's disease. 20 patients had their anastomoses sutured (sutured group) and 22 had their anastomosis stapled (stapled group) over two successive periods. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Postoperative complications and anastomotic leak rate. RESULTS: None of the patients were on immunosuppressive treatment and about half in each group had had several weeks of preoperative enteral nutrition. No anastomotic-related complications and few other postoperative complications were noted, irrespective of the anastomotic technique used. CONCLUSION: A strategy to operate on Crohn patients without steroids and, if indicated, treated preoperatively with enteral nutrition and percutaneous drainage of abscesses resulted in no anastomotic leaks and few postoperative complications. These results were independent of the anastomotic technique used.
PubMed ID
12182240 View in PubMed
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