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Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1999
  1 website  
Author
Lanier, A.P.
Holck, P.
Kelly, J.
Smith, B.
McEvoy, T.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Health Board
Date
1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Aleut
Athabaskan
Inuit
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cancer - Alaska
Cancer - Alaska - Statistics
Indians of North American - Alaska - Mortality - Statistics
Eskimos - Alaska - Mortality - Statistics
Aleuts - Mortality - Statistics
Abstract
This report presents Alaska Native cancer survival rates and stage of disease at diagnosis. Data on survival and stage at diagnosis are given for all cancers combined, and for select primary cancer sites (the organ in which the cancer first began). Survival rates are given for only those cancers for which there were enough patients to calculate reliable estimates. The focus is on five-year relative survival rates because these rates are most commonly used in the cancer literature and most appropriate for comparisons between populations. For the two time periods used in calculation of survival rates, specifically 1969-83 and 1984-94, the authors determined follow-up status through 1994. This report compares survival rates for Alaska Natives with those of US Whites. These survival rates are specific for Alaska Natives and cannot be extrapolated to American Indian or other indigenous populations.
Notes
ALASKA QZ200.AA5 A434 1999
Online Resources
Less detail

Assessing the Everyday Discrimination Scale among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278634
Source
Psychol Assess. 2016 Jan;28(1):51-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Kelly L Gonzales
Carolyn Noonan
R Turner Goins
William G Henderson
Janette Beals
Spero M Manson
Kelly J Acton
Yvette Roubideaux
Source
Psychol Assess. 2016 Jan;28(1):51-8
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Alaska Natives - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Psychological Tests
Racism - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS) has been used widely as a measure of subjective experiences of discrimination. The usefulness of this measure for assessments of perceived experiences of discrimination by American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) peoples has not been explored. Data derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians--Healthy Heart Demonstration Project (SDPI-HH), a large-scale initiative to reduce cardiovascular risk among AI/ANs with Type 2 diabetes. Participants (N = 3,039) completed a self-report survey that included the EDS and measures of convergent and divergent validity. Missing data were estimated by multiple imputation techniques. Reliability estimates for the EDS were calculated, yielding a single factor with high internal consistency (a = .92). Younger, more educated respondents reported greater perceived discrimination; retired or widowed respondents reported less. Convergent validity was evidenced by levels of distress, anger, and hostility, which increased as the level of perceived discrimination increased (all p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26146948 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers, supports, and effective interventions for uptake of human papillomavirus- and other vaccines within global and Canadian Indigenous peoples: a systematic review protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290200
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 Mar 02; 7(1):40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-02-2018
Author
Kelly J Mrklas
Shannon MacDonald
Melissa A Shea-Budgell
Nancy Bedingfield
Heather Ganshorn
Sarah Glaze
Lea Bill
Bonnie Healy
Chyloe Healy
Juliet Guichon
Amy Colquhoun
Christopher Bell
Ruth Richardson
Rita Henderson
James Kellner
Cheryl Barnabe
Robert A Bednarczyk
Angeline Letendre
Gregg S Nelson
Author Affiliation
Research Innovation and Analytics, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 Mar 02; 7(1):40
Date
Mar-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Despite the existence of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines with demonstrated safety and effectiveness and funded HPV vaccination programs, coverage rates are persistently lower and cervical cancer burden higher among Canadian Indigenous peoples. Barriers and supports to HPV vaccination in Indigenous peoples have not been systematically documented, nor have interventions to increase uptake in this population. This protocol aims to appraise the literature in Canadian and global Indigenous peoples, relating to documented barriers and supports to vaccination and interventions to increase acceptability/uptake or reduce hesitancy of vaccination. Although HPV vaccination is the primary focus, we anticipate only a small number of relevant studies to emerge from the search and will, therefore, employ a broad search strategy to capture literature related to both HPV vaccination and vaccination in general in global Indigenous peoples.
Eligible studies will include global Indigenous peoples and discuss barriers or supports and/or interventions to improve uptake or to reduce hesitancy, for the HPV vaccine and/or other vaccines. Primary outcomes are documented barriers or supports or interventions. All study designs meeting inclusion criteria will be considered, without restricting by language, location, or data type. We will use an a priori search strategy, comprised of key words and controlled vocabulary terms, developed in consultation with an academic librarian, and reviewed by a second academic librarian using the PRESS checklist. We will search several electronic databases from date of inception, without restrictions. A pre-defined group of global Indigenous websites will be reviewed for relevant gray literature. Bibliographic searches will be conducted for all included studies to identify relevant reviews. Data analysis will include an inductive, qualitative, thematic synthesis and a quantitative analysis of measured barriers and supports, as well as a descriptive synthesis and quantitative summary of measures for interventions.
To our knowledge, this study will contribute the first systematic review of documented barriers, supports, and interventions for vaccination in general and for HPV vaccination. The results of this study are expected to inform future research, policies, programs, and community-driven initiatives to enhance acceptability and uptake of HPV vaccination among Indigenous peoples.
PROSPERO Registration Number: CRD42017048844.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29499749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers, supports, and effective interventions for uptake of human papillomavirus- and other vaccines within global and Canadian Indigenous peoples: a systematic review protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296896
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 03 02; 7(1):40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
03-02-2018
Author
Kelly J Mrklas
Shannon MacDonald
Melissa A Shea-Budgell
Nancy Bedingfield
Heather Ganshorn
Sarah Glaze
Lea Bill
Bonnie Healy
Chyloe Healy
Juliet Guichon
Amy Colquhoun
Christopher Bell
Ruth Richardson
Rita Henderson
James Kellner
Cheryl Barnabe
Robert A Bednarczyk
Angeline Letendre
Gregg S Nelson
Author Affiliation
Research Innovation and Analytics, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 03 02; 7(1):40
Date
03-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Population Groups - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaccination
Abstract
Despite the existence of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines with demonstrated safety and effectiveness and funded HPV vaccination programs, coverage rates are persistently lower and cervical cancer burden higher among Canadian Indigenous peoples. Barriers and supports to HPV vaccination in Indigenous peoples have not been systematically documented, nor have interventions to increase uptake in this population. This protocol aims to appraise the literature in Canadian and global Indigenous peoples, relating to documented barriers and supports to vaccination and interventions to increase acceptability/uptake or reduce hesitancy of vaccination. Although HPV vaccination is the primary focus, we anticipate only a small number of relevant studies to emerge from the search and will, therefore, employ a broad search strategy to capture literature related to both HPV vaccination and vaccination in general in global Indigenous peoples.
Eligible studies will include global Indigenous peoples and discuss barriers or supports and/or interventions to improve uptake or to reduce hesitancy, for the HPV vaccine and/or other vaccines. Primary outcomes are documented barriers or supports or interventions. All study designs meeting inclusion criteria will be considered, without restricting by language, location, or data type. We will use an a priori search strategy, comprised of key words and controlled vocabulary terms, developed in consultation with an academic librarian, and reviewed by a second academic librarian using the PRESS checklist. We will search several electronic databases from date of inception, without restrictions. A pre-defined group of global Indigenous websites will be reviewed for relevant gray literature. Bibliographic searches will be conducted for all included studies to identify relevant reviews. Data analysis will include an inductive, qualitative, thematic synthesis and a quantitative analysis of measured barriers and supports, as well as a descriptive synthesis and quantitative summary of measures for interventions.
To our knowledge, this study will contribute the first systematic review of documented barriers, supports, and interventions for vaccination in general and for HPV vaccination. The results of this study are expected to inform future research, policies, programs, and community-driven initiatives to enhance acceptability and uptake of HPV vaccination among Indigenous peoples.
PROSPERO Registration Number: CRD42017048844.
PubMed ID
29499749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Capturing the Experience: Reflections of Women With Breast Cancer Engaged in an Expressive Writing Intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282869
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2016 Jul-Aug;39(4):E51-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Birgitta Haga Gripsrud
Kelly J Brassil
Barbara Summers
Håvard Søiland
Steven Kronowitz
Kirsten Lode
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2016 Jul-Aug;39(4):E51-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life - psychology
Southwestern United States
Stress, Psychological - therapy
Survivors - psychology
Writing
Abstract
Expressive writing has been shown to improve quality of life, fatigue, and posttraumatic stress among breast cancer patients across cultures. Understanding how and why the method may be beneficial to patients can increase awareness of the psychosocial impact of breast cancer and enhance interventional work within this population. Qualitative research on experiential aspects of interventions may inform the theoretical understanding and generate hypotheses for future studies.
The aim of the study was to explore and describe the experience and feasibility of expressive writing among women with breast cancer following mastectomy and immediate or delayed reconstructive surgery.
Seven participants enrolled to undertake 4 episodes of expressive writing at home, with semistructured interviews conducted afterward and analyzed using experiential thematic analysis.
Three themes emerged through analysis: writing as process, writing as therapeutic, and writing as a means to help others.
Findings illuminate experiential variations in expressive writing and how storytelling encourages a release of cognitive and emotional strains, surrendering these to reside in the text. The method was said to process feelings and capture experiences tied to a new and overwhelming illness situation, as impressions became expressions through writing. Expressive writing, therefore, is a valuable tool for healthcare providers to introduce into the plan of care for patients with breast cancer and potentially other cancer patient groups.
This study augments existing evidence to support the appropriateness of expressive writing as an intervention after a breast cancer diagnosis. Further studies should evaluate its feasibility at different time points in survivorship.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26390074 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case management to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in American Indians and Alaska Natives with diabetes: results from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258730
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Nov;104(11):e158-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Kelly Moore
Luohua Jiang
Spero M Manson
Janette Beals
William Henderson
Katherine Pratte
Kelly J Acton
Yvette Roubideaux
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Nov;104(11):e158-64
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Case Management
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diabetic Angiopathies - prevention & control
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Pilot Projects
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - prevention & control
Triglycerides - blood
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with diabetes in the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart (SDPI-HH) Demonstration Project.
Multidisciplinary teams implemented an intensive case management intervention among 30 health care programs serving 138 tribes. The project recruited 3373 participants, with and without current CVD, between 2006 and 2009. We examined data collected at baseline and 1 year later to determine whether improvements occurred in CVD risk factors and in Framingham coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores, aspirin use, and smoking status.
A1c levels decreased an average of 0.2% (P
PubMed ID
25211728 View in PubMed
Less detail

Continuing medical education for community health aides/practitioners

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2850
Source
Pages 100-102 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
  1 document  
Author
Kelly, J
Author Affiliation
Anchorage Community Health Aide / Practitioner Training Program, Anchorage, AK
Source
Pages 100-102 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Continuing medical education
Indigenous health workers
Documents
Less detail

The costs of treating American Indian adults with diabetes within the Indian Health Service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126444
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Feb;102(2):301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Joan M O'Connell
Charlton Wilson
Spero M Manson
Kelly J Acton
Author Affiliation
Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. joan.oconnell@ucdenver.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Feb;102(2):301-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus - economics - ethnology
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Insurance Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service - economics - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the costs of treating American Indian adults with diabetes within the Indian Health Service (IHS).
We extracted demographic and health service utilization data from the IHS electronic medical reporting system for 32?052 American Indian adults in central Arizona in 2004 and 2005. We derived treatment cost estimates from an IHS facility-specific cost report. We examined chronic condition prevalence, medical service utilization, and treatment costs for American Indians with and without diabetes.
IHS treatment costs for the 10.9% of American Indian adults with diabetes accounted for 37.0% of all adult treatment costs. Persons with diabetes accounted for nearly half of all hospital days (excluding days for obstetrical care). Hospital inpatient service costs for those with diabetes accounted for 32.2% of all costs.
In this first study of treatment costs within the IHS, costs for American Indians with diabetes were found to consume a significant proportion of IHS resources. The findings give federal agencies and tribes critical information for resource allocation and policy formulation to reduce and eventually eliminate diabetes-related disparities between American Indians and Alaska Natives and other racial/ethnic populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22390444 View in PubMed
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Data set for reporting of lung carcinomas: recommendations from International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108368
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Aug;137(8):1054-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Kirk D Jones
Andrew Churg
Douglas W Henderson
David M Hwang
Jenny Ma Wyatt
Andrew G Nicholson
Alexandra J Rice
Mary Kay Washington
Kelly J Butnor
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Aug;137(8):1054-62
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australasia
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Databases, Factual - standards
Female
Great Britain
Humans
International Cooperation
Lung Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Male
Pathology, Clinical - standards
Research Design - standards
Societies, Medical
United States
Abstract
The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting (ICCR) is a quadripartite alliance formed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, the Royal College of Pathologists of the United Kingdom, the College of American Pathologists, and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. The ICCR was formed with a view to reducing the global burden of cancer data set development and reduplication of effort by different international institutions that commission, publish, and maintain standardized cancer-reporting data sets. The resultant standardization of cancer reporting would be expected to benefit not only those countries directly involved in the collaboration but also others not in a position to develop their own data sets.
To develop an evidence-based reporting data set for each cancer site.
A project to develop data sets for prostate, endometrium, and lung cancers and malignant melanoma was piloted by the quadripartite group.
A set of required and recommended data elements and appropriate responses for each element were agreed upon for the reporting of lung cancer.
This review describes the process of development of the lung cancer data set.
PubMed ID
23899061 View in PubMed
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Drinking to enhance and to cope: a daily process study of motive specificity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131901
Source
Addict Behav. 2011 Dec;36(12):1174-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Kelly J Arbeau
Don Kuiken
T Cameron Wild
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, P217 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E9.
Source
Addict Behav. 2011 Dec;36(12):1174-83
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Affect
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Canada
Conscience
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological
Students - psychology
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Daily process studies of internal drinking motives have not examined motive specificity, i.e., whether theoretically plausible trait and situational antecedents differ in their ability to predict the extent to which alcohol consumption on any given day is motivated by coping or enhancement.
University students (N=81) completed trait measures of coping and enhancement-motivated drinking (trait CM and EM), sensation seeking, and conscientiousness, and then completed a 14-day online diary assessing daily completion of tasks, daily alcohol use, and (on days when alcohol was consumed) the extent to which drinking was motivated by coping or enhancement (daily CM and EM).
Hierarchical linear models revealed unique situational and trait antecedents of daily CM and EM. In the daily EM drinking model, main effects of daily positive affect (b=0.11, p
PubMed ID
21864984 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.