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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292349
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-07-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Ecology and Environmental Biology, Ghent University , 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Date
Nov-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Geologic sediments
Metals
North Sea
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286492
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Date
Oct-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
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The Arctic ecosystem: A canary in the coal mine for global multiple stressors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298187
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019 Mar; 38(3):487-488
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019 Mar; 38(3):487-488
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
PubMed ID
30742724 View in PubMed
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Bioaccumulation of PCBs in Arctic seabirds: influence of dietary exposure and congener biotransformation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4749
Source
Environ Pollut. 2005 Apr;134(3):397-409
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Katrine Borgå
Hans Wolkers
Janneche U Skaare
Haakon Hop
Derek C G Muir
Geir W Gabrielsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway. katrine.borga@npolar.no
Source
Environ Pollut. 2005 Apr;134(3):397-409
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biotransformation
Birds - metabolism
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - metabolism
Diet
Environmental Pollutants - pharmacokinetics
Female
Fishes
Male
Phylogeny
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - pharmacokinetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seawater
Sex Factors
Zooplankton
Abstract
Four seabird species and their prey (zooplankton or fish) were collected in the Barents Sea to determine how dietary exposure, cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activities and sex influenced their hepatic PCB concentrations and accumulation patterns. Five males and five females from each seabird species (little auk (Alle alle), Brunnich's guillemot (Uria lomvia), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) and black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla)) were analysed. PCB concentrations could not be explained directly by carbon source (delta13C) or trophic position (delta15N), but by a combination of dietary parameters (delta13C, delta15N, migratory pattern, age) and contaminant metabolism. Contrary to previous studies, the PCB pattern differed among seabirds, with a higher proportion of persistent congeners (% of PCB-153, RPCB-153) in black-legged kittiwake than in auks. The PCB pattern also differed among auks, with little auk as the most efficient biotransformer (highest RPCB-153 values of persistent congeners). Based on high RPCB-153 values, Brunnich's guillemot poorly metabolised ortho-meta-unsubstituted congeners, whereas black guillemot poorly metabolised meta-para unsubstituted congeners. Species-specific differences in PCB biotransformation were confirmed by metabolic indices, where PCB patterns in seabirds were adjusted for PCB pattern in prey. The relative contribution of ortho-meta-unsubstituted congeners to SigmaPCBs decreased with increasing EROD activity. There were no differences in PCB concentrations, PCB patterns or cytochrome P450 enzyme activities between males and females. CYP P450 activities (CYP1A- and CYP2B/3A-like: EROD and testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation, respectively) were low and did not correlate with concentrations of non- or mono-ortho Cl-substituted PCBs (NO- and MO-PCBs), or with total toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs) for dioxin-like effects of NO- and MO-PCBs.
PubMed ID
15620585 View in PubMed
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Biological and chemical factors of importance in the bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of persistent organochlorine contaminants in Arctic marine food webs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4755
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2004 Oct;23(10):2367-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
  1 website  
Author
Katrine Borgå
Aaron T Fisk
Paul E Hoekstra
Derek C G Muir
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2004 Oct;23(10):2367-85
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Arctic Regions
Diet
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Food chain
Humans
Lindane - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Lipids - chemistry
Organic Chemicals
Reproduction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Recent studies of arctic marine food webs have provided detailed insights regarding the biological and chemical factors that influence the bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of persistent organochlorine (OC) contaminants in aquatic systems. The present paper summarizes the recent literature with an emphasis on identifying important ecological factors for explaining variability of OC concentrations among organisms. The Arctic ecosystem has a number of unique attributes, including long food chains, reduced diversity of species, similar food webs across the entire region, and limited influence from pollution point sources. Lipid content, body size, age, gender, reproduction, habitat use, migration, biotransformation, seasonal changes in habitat conditions, feeding ecology, and trophic position have all been demonstrated to influence OC concentrations and bioaccumulation in arctic marine biota. The relative importance of each factor varies among OCs and organisms. Diet or trophic level is the dominant factor influencing OC concentrations and dynamics in seabirds and marine mammals, although biotransformation can significantly influence nonrecalcitrant OCs, such as hexachlorocyclohexane isomers. Dietary accumulation of OCs is also an important route of exposure for arctic fish and zooplankton, and biomagnification of OCs may also occur among these organisms. To date, only limited attempts have been made to model trophic transfer of OCs in the arctic marine food web. Although models developed to assess OC dynamics in aquatic food webs have included some biological variables (e.g., lipid content, feeding rate, diet composition, and growth rate), selection of processes included in these models as well as their mathematical solutions and parameterization all introduce simplification. This reduces biological validity of the models and may be particularly problematic in a highly seasonal environment, such as the Arctic Ocean.
PubMed ID
15511099 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Consistency in trophic magnification factors of cyclic methyl siloxanes in pelagic freshwater food webs leading to brown trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257139
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Dec 17;47(24):14394-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-17-2013
Author
Katrine Borgå
Eirik Fjeld
Amelie Kierkegaard
Michael S McLachlan
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadallèen 21, N-0349 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Dec 17;47(24):14394-402
Date
Dec-17-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carbon Isotopes
Diet
Environmental monitoring
Food chain
Fresh Water - chemistry
Lakes - chemistry
Limit of Detection
Lipids - analysis
Nitrogen Isotopes
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Siloxanes - analysis
Trout - physiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) concentrations were analyzed in the pelagic food web of two Norwegian lakes (Mjøsa, Randsfjorden), and in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) collected in a reference lake (Femunden), in 2012. Lakes receiving discharge from wastewater treatment plants (Mjøsa and Randsfjorden) had cVMS concentrations in trout that were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those in Femunden, where most samples were close to the limit of quantification (LOQ). Food web biomagnification of cVMS in Mjøsa and Randsfjorden was quantified by estimation of trophic magnification factors (TMFs). TMF for legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were analyzed for comparison. Both decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) biomagnified with TMFs of 2.9 (2.1-4.0) and 2.3 (1.8-3.0), respectively. Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) was below the LOQ in the majority of samples and had substantially lower biomagnification than for D5 and D6. The cVMS TMFs did not differ between the lakes, whereas the legacy POP TMFs were higher in Mjøsa than inRandsfjorden. Whitefish had lower cVMS bioaccumulation compared to legacy POPs, and affected the TMF significance for cVMS, but not for POPs. TMFs of D5 and legacy contaminants in Lake Mjøsa were consistent with those previously measured in Mjøsa.
PubMed ID
24279694 View in PubMed
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DNA DAMAGE IN ARCTIC SEABIRDS: BASELINE, SENSITIVITY TO A GENOTOXIC STRESSOR AND ASSOCIATION TO ORGANOHALOGEN CONTAMINANTS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286975
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Nov 09;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-09-2017
Author
Ane Haarr
Ketil Hylland
Norith Eckbo
Geir Wing Gabrielsen
Dorte Herzke
Jan Ove Bustnes
Pierre Blevin
Olivier Chastel
Børge Moe
Sveinn Are Hanssen
Kjetil Sagerup
Katrine Borgå
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Nov 09;
Date
Nov-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Environmental contaminants are found throughout Arctic marine ecosystems, and their presence in seabirds has been associated with toxicological responses. However, there are few studies of genotoxicity in Arctic avian wildlife. The purpose of the present study was to quantify DNA damage in lymphocytes of selected seabird species and to examine whether accumulation of organohalogen contaminants ( OHCs) affects DNA damage. Blood was sampled from common eider (Somateria mollissima), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), arctic skua (Stercorarius parasiticus), and great skua (Stercorarius skua) in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. Contaminant concentrations found in the six species differed presumably due to foraging ecology and biomagnification. Despite large differences in contaminant concentrations, ranging from SOHCs 3.3 ng/g ww in the common eider to SOHCs 895 ng/g ww in the great skua, there was no strong difference among the species in baseline DNA damage or sensitivity to a genotoxic stressor (i.e. hydrogen peroxide). Baseline levels of DNA damage were low, with median values ranging from 1.7% in the common eider to 8.6% in the great skua. There were no associations between DNA damage and contaminants in the investigated species, suggesting that contaminant concentrations in Kongsfjorden are too low to evoke genotoxic effects, or possibly that lymphocytes are resistant to strand breakage. Clearly, genotoxicity is a topic for future studies of Arctic seabirds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PubMed ID
29120089 View in PubMed
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DNA damage in Arctic seabirds: Baseline, sensitivity to a genotoxic stressor, and association with organohalogen contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296924
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 04; 37(4):1084-1091
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Ane Haarr
Ketil Hylland
Norith Eckbo
Geir Wing Gabrielsen
Dorte Herzke
Jan Ove Bustnes
Pierre Blévin
Olivier Chastel
Børge Moe
Sveinn Are Hanssen
Kjetil Sagerup
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 04; 37(4):1084-1091
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Charadriiformes - metabolism
DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded - drug effects
DNA Damage
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - toxicity
Lipids - analysis
Mutagens - toxicity
Principal Component Analysis
Abstract
Environmental contaminants are found throughout Arctic marine ecosystems, and their presence in seabirds has been associated with toxicological responses. However, there are few studies of genotoxicity in Arctic avian wildlife. The purpose of the present study was to quantify deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in lymphocytes of selected seabird species and to examine whether accumulation of organohalogen contaminants (SOHCs) affects DNA damage. Blood was sampled from common eider (Somateria mollissima), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), arctic skua (Stercorarius parasiticus), and great skua (Stercorarius skua) in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (Norway). Contaminant concentrations found in the 6 species differed, presumably because of foraging ecology and biomagnification. Despite large differences in contaminant concentrations, ranging from SOHCs 3.3?ng/g wet weight in the common eider to SOHCs 895?ng/g wet weight in the great skua, there was no strong difference among the species in baseline DNA damage or sensitivity to a genotoxic stressor (hydrogen peroxide). Baseline levels of DNA damage were low, with median values ranging from 1.7% in the common eider to 8.6% in the great skua. There were no associations between DNA damage and contaminants in the investigated species, suggesting that contaminant concentrations in Kongsfjorden are too low to evoke genotoxic effects, or possibly that lymphocytes are resistant to strand breakage. Clearly, genotoxicity is a topic for future studies of Arctic seabirds. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:1084-1091. © 2017 SETAC.
PubMed ID
29120089 View in PubMed
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Effect of diet, location and sampling year on bioaccumulation of mercury, selenium and cadmium in pelagic feeding seabirds in Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258465
Source
Chemosphere. 2014 Nov 28;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-28-2014
Author
Ida Beathe Overjordet
Geir Wing Gabrielsen
Torunn Berg
Anders Ruus
Anita Evenset
Katrine Borgå
Guttorm Christensen
Syverin Lierhagen
Bjørn Munro Jenssen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Biology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: ida.beathe.overjordet@sintef.no.
Source
Chemosphere. 2014 Nov 28;
Date
Nov-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Hepatic concentrations of mercury (Hg), selenium (Se) and cadmium (Cd) were determined in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) and little auks (Alle alle) from two fjords in Svalbard (Kongsfjorden; 78°57'N, 12°12'E and Liefdefjorden; 79°37'N, 13°20'E). The inflow of Arctic and Atlantic water differs between the two fjords, potentially affecting element accumulation. Trophic positions (TP) were derived from stable nitrogen isotope ratios (d(15)N), and stable carbon isotope ratios (d(13)C) were assessed to evaluate the terrestrial influence on element accumulation. Mercury, Cd, TP and d(13)C varied significantly between locations and years in both species. Trophic position and feeding habits explained Hg and Cd accumulation in kittiwakes, but not in little auks. Biomagnification of Hg and Cd were found in the food webs of both the Atlantic and the Arctic fjord, and no inter-fjord differences were detected. The d(13)C were higher in the seabirds from Kongsfjorden than in Liefdefjorden, but this did not explain variations in element accumulation. Selenium concentrations were not influenced by Hg accumulation in kittiwakes, indicating baseline levels of Se in this species. In contrast, correlations between Hg and Se and lower Se:Hg ratios in little auks from Kongsfjorden than in Liefdefjorden indicate a more pronounced influence of Se-Hg complex formation in little auks feeding in Atlantic waters.
PubMed ID
25441931 View in PubMed
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The effect of long-range transport, trophic position and diet specialization on legacy contaminant occurrence in great skuas, Stercorarius skua, breeding across the Northeast Atlantic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297697
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jan; 244:55-65
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Eliza H K Leat
Sophie Bourgeon
Sveinn A Hanssen
Aevar Petersen
Hallvard Strøm
Tor Harry Bjørn
Geir W Gabrielsen
Jan Ove Bustnes
Robert W Furness
Ane Haarr
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Graham Kerr Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jan; 244:55-65
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Breeding
Charadriiformes - blood
Diet
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fishes
Food chain
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - blood
Oceans and Seas
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Population Dynamics
Scotland
Svalbard
Abstract
High levels of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) have been found in the marine predatory seabird great skua (Stercorarius skua) from breeding colonies in the Northeastern Atlantic, with large unexplained inter-colony variation. The present study aimed at analyzing if the HOCs occurrence in breeding great skuas in remote colonies was explained by local baseline food web exposure determined by long-range transport, or by ecological factors such as diet specialization and relative trophic position in the breeding area. The occurrence of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) was analyzed in plasma of 204 adult great skuas collected over two years (2008 and 2009) and 5 colonies across the North-Atlantic from Shetland to Svalbard. The SHOCs levels in plasma ranged across two orders of magnitude, from 40 to 7600?ng/g (wet weight) and differed significantly across the great skua colonies. The variation in contaminant occurrence among colonies did not reflect long-range transport through a latitudinal or remoteness gradient, as the second northernmost colony (Bjørnøya), had the highest contaminant concentrations. No latitudinal or remoteness gradient was evident in the contaminant pattern among the colonies. The contaminant levels increased significantly with increasing d15N values, and regurgitated pellets of undigested prey suggested that great skuas with higher d15N values had a higher proportion of bird prey in their diet, mostly seabirds. In contrast, great skuas from colonies with lower d15N and lower contaminant level fed mostly on fish. The enrichment of d13C increased with decreasing d15N and lower contaminant levels. Therefore, individual behavior of great skuas, such as migration strategies and diet specialization, rather than long-range transport and thus baseline food web exposure, explain among and within colony variance in contaminant occurrence.
PubMed ID
30321712 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.