Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Emergy accounting for regional studies: case study of Canada and its provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116097
Source
J Environ Manage. 2013 Mar 30;118:177-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2013
Author
Navid Hossaini
Kasun Hewage
Author Affiliation
School of Engineering, University of British Columbia, 1137 Alumni Ave., Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada. navid.hossaini@ubc.ca
Source
J Environ Manage. 2013 Mar 30;118:177-85
Date
Mar-30-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Conservation of Energy Resources
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Ecosystem
Geography
Human Activities
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Thermodynamics
Abstract
Sustainable regional management (development) requires an understanding of interactions between the social, economic, and ecological systems within the boundaries of a region. In this paper, application of emergy (an environmental accounting method) for regional planning is discussed through a case study. Emergy (spelled with an "m") methodology is an environmental accounting technique that evaluates the energy system for the thermodynamics of an open system. Major renewable and non-renewable resource fluxes to a region, including energy, matter, human activities, and money can be converted to emergy by using corresponding transformity functions. As a case study, this paper discusses the emergy accounting of Canada and its provinces with various emergy-based indicators. Moreover, emergy maps were generated in a form of emergy geography. These maps are multi-dimensional illustrations that show resource consumption, emergy per person, and emergy density across Canada under two parameters: (1) the quantities of resources consumed and (2) the location of consumption. Emergy analysis also highlights concentrations of renewable and natural resources in Canada and distinguishes the provinces with the highest resource consumption. Analysis of emergy indicator for Canadian provinces shows that Alberta with the highest EYR (7.35) provides energy to the economy of Canada. However, ELR value of Alberta (8.5) indicates that the province's current economic approach is not sustainable as it relies mainly on non-renewable emergy inputs (mainly from fossil fuels). ELR of British Columbia and Manitoba indicates that these two provinces created a firm balance between emergy use of renewable and non-renewable resources. The characterizations of regions provided in this paper can be used for future land planning and management both in federal and provincial levels.
PubMed ID
23435155 View in PubMed
Less detail

Selection of oil spill response method in Arctic offshore waters: A fuzzy decision tree based framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304546
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2020 Dec; 161(Pt A):111705
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Guangji Hu
Saeed Mohammadiun
Abdorreza Alavi Gharahbagh
Jianbing Li
Kasun Hewage
Rehan Sadiq
Author Affiliation
School of Engineering, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada. Electronic address: guangji.hu@ubc.ca.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2020 Dec; 161(Pt A):111705
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Decision Trees
Petroleum Pollution
Abstract
A fuzzy decision tree (FDT) based framework was developed to facilitate the selection of suitable oil spill response methods in the Arctic. Hypothetical oil spill cases were developed based on six identified attributes, while the suitability of three spill response methods (mechanical containment and recovery, use of chemical dispersants, and in-situ burning) for each spill case was obtained based on expert judgments. Fuzzy sets were used to address the associated uncertainties, and FDTs were then developed through generating: i) one decision tree for all three response methods (FDT-AP1) and ii) one decision tree for each response method and the development of linear regression models at terminal nodes (FDT-LR). The FDT-LR approach exhibited higher prediction accuracy than the FDT-AP1 approach. A maximum of 100% accurate predictions could be achieved for testing cases using it. On average, 75% of suitable oil spill response methods out of 10,000 performed iterations were predicted correctly.
PubMed ID
33022490 View in PubMed
Less detail