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Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic: establishment of a circumpolar working group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257279
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Alan J Parkinson
Birgitta Evengard
Jan C Semenza
Nicholas Ogden
Malene L Børresen
Jim Berner
Michael Brubaker
Anders Sjöstedt
Magnus Evander
David M Hondula
Bettina Menne
Natalia Pshenichnaya
Prabhu Gounder
Tricia Larose
Boris Revich
Karsten Hueffer
Ann Albihn
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated. There is concern that climate change may shift the geographic and temporal distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic animals. Potentially climate-sensitive zoonotic pathogens of circumpolar concern include Brucella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp., Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bacillus anthracis, Echinococcus spp., Leptospira spp., Giardia spp., Cryptosporida spp., Coxiella burnetti, rabies virus, West Nile virus, Hantaviruses, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25317383 View in PubMed
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Correction for Hansen et al., Draft Genome Sequence of a Taxonomically Unique Neisseria Strain Isolated from a Greater White-Fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) Egg on the North Slope of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270111
Source
Genome Announc. 2016;4(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Cristina M Hansen
Sang Chul Choi
Jayme Parker
Karsten Hueffer
Jack Chen
Source
Genome Announc. 2016;4(1)
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Notes
ErratumFor: Genome Announc. 2015;3(4). pii: e00772-15. doi: 10.1128/genomeA.00772-1526184936
PubMed ID
26868411 View in PubMed
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Development of a genotype-by-sequencing immunogenetic assay as exemplified by screening for variation in red fox with and without endemic rabies exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288121
Source
Ecol Evol. 2018 Jan;8(1):572-583
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Michael E Donaldson
Yessica Rico
Karsten Hueffer
Halie M Rando
Anna V Kukekova
Christopher J Kyle
Source
Ecol Evol. 2018 Jan;8(1):572-583
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Pathogens are recognized as major drivers of local adaptation in wildlife systems. By determining which gene variants are favored in local interactions among populations with and without disease, spatially explicit adaptive responses to pathogens can be elucidated. Much of our current understanding of host responses to disease comes from a small number of genes associated with an immune response. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies, such as genotype-by-sequencing (GBS), facilitate expanded explorations of genomic variation among populations. Hybridization-based GBS techniques can be leveraged in systems not well characterized for specific variants associated with disease outcome to "capture" specific genes and regulatory regions known to influence expression and disease outcome. We developed a multiplexed, sequence capture assay for red foxes to simultaneously assess ~300-kbp of genomic sequence from 116 adaptive, intrinsic, and innate immunity genes of predicted adaptive significance and their putative upstream regulatory regions along with 23 neutral microsatellite regions to control for demographic effects. The assay was applied to 45 fox DNA samples from Alaska, where three arctic rabies strains are geographically restricted and endemic to coastal tundra regions, yet absent from the boreal interior. The assay provided 61.5% on-target enrichment with relatively even sequence coverage across all targeted loci and samples (mean = 50×), which allowed us to elucidate genetic variation across introns, exons, and potential regulatory regions (4,819 SNPs). Challenges remained in accurately describing microsatellite variation using this technique; however, longer-read HTS technologies should overcome these issues. We used these data to conduct preliminary analyses and detected genetic structure in a subset of red fox immune-related genes between regions with and without endemic arctic rabies. This assay provides a template to assess immunogenetic variation in wildlife disease systems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29321894 View in PubMed
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Draft Genome Sequence of a Taxonomically Unique Neisseria Strain Isolated from a Greater White-Fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) Egg on the North Slope of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264774
Source
Genome Announc. 2015;3(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cristina M Hansen
Sang Chul Choi
Jayme Parker
Karsten Hueffer
Jack Chen
Source
Genome Announc. 2015;3(4)
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We report here the draft genome sequence of a unique Neisseria strain that was isolated from a greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) egg. The sequencing was performed with an Illumina MiSeq system, and the sequence consists of 275 contigs. The total genome is 2,397,978 bp long and has a G+C content of 46.4%.
PubMed ID
26184936 View in PubMed
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Ecological niche modeling of rabies in the changing Arctic of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281275
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2017 Mar 20;59(1):18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2017
Author
Falk Huettmann
Emily Elizabeth Magnuson
Karsten Hueffer
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2017 Mar 20;59(1):18
Date
Mar-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Rabies is a disease of global significance including in the circumpolar Arctic. In Alaska enzootic rabies persist in northern and western coastal areas. Only sporadic cases have occurred in areas outside of the regions considered enzootic for the virus, such as the interior of the state and urbanized regions.
Here we examine the distribution of diagnosed rabies cases in Alaska, explicit in space and time. We use a geographic information system (GIS), 20 environmental data layers and provide a quantitative non-parsimonious estimate of the predicted ecological niche, based on data mining, machine learning and open access data. We identify ecological correlates and possible drivers that determine the ecological niche of rabies virus in Alaska. More specifically, our models show that rabies cases are closely associated with human infrastructure, and reveal an ecological niche in remote northern wilderness areas. Furthermore a model utilizing climate modeling suggests a reduction of the current ecological niche for detection of rabies virus in Alaska, a state that is disproportionately affected by a changing climate.
Our results may help to better inform public health decisions in the future and guide further studies on individual drivers of rabies distribution in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
28320440 View in PubMed
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The ecological niche of reported rabies cases in Canada is similar to Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312129
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2021 May 06; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-06-2021
Author
Falk Huettmann
Karsten Hueffer
Author Affiliation
EWHALE lab- Inst of Arctic Biology, Department of Biology & Wildlife, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2021 May 06; :
Date
May-06-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The ecology of rabies in the circumpolar North is still not well understood. We use machine learning, a geographic information system and data explicit in time and space obtained for reported rabies cases and predictors in Canada to develop an ecological niche model for the distribution of reported rabies cases in the American north (Alaska and Canada). The ecological niche model based on reported rabies cases in Canada predicted reported rabies cases in Alaska, suggesting a rather robust inference and even similar drivers on a continental scale. As found in Alaska, proximity to human infrastructure-specifically along the coast-was a strong predictor in the detection of rabies cases in Canada. Also, this finding highlights the need for a more systematic landscape sampling for rabies infection model predictions to better understand and tackle the ecology of this important zoonotic disease on a landscape scale at some distance from human infrastructure in wilderness areas.
PubMed ID
33955689 View in PubMed
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Factors Contributing to Anthrax Outbreaks in the Circumpolar North.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307092
Source
Ecohealth. 2020 03; 17(1):174-180
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
03-2020
Author
Karsten Hueffer
Devin Drown
Vladimir Romanovsky
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Medicine & Arctic and Northern Studies Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2141 North Koyukuk Dr., Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. khueffer@alaska.edu.
Source
Ecohealth. 2020 03; 17(1):174-180
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
A 2016 outbreak of anthrax on the Yamal Peninsula in Siberia that led to the culling of more than two hundred thousand reindeer and killed one human, resulted in significant media interests and in the reporting was often linked to thawing permafrost and ultimately climate change. Here, we review the historic context of anthrax outbreaks in the circumpolar North and explore alternative explanations for the anthrax outbreak in Western Siberia. Further, we propose a convergence model where multiple factors likely contributed to the outbreak of anthrax, including an expanded population and discontinued vaccination.
PubMed ID
32006181 View in PubMed
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Investigation of a Canine Parvovirus Outbreak using Next Generation Sequencing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299517
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 29; 7(1):9633
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-29-2017
Author
Jayme Parker
Molly Murphy
Karsten Hueffer
Jack Chen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 29; 7(1):9633
Date
08-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - virology
Dogs
Genotype
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Molecular Epidemiology
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Parvovirus, Canine - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
RNA, Viral - chemistry - genetics
Rectum - virology
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Abstract
Canine parvovirus (CPV) outbreaks can have a devastating effect in communities with dense dog populations. The interior region of Alaska experienced a CPV outbreak in the winter of 2016 leading to the further investigation of the virus due to reports of increased morbidity and mortality occurring at dog mushing kennels in the area. Twelve rectal-swab specimens from dogs displaying clinical signs consistent with parvoviral-associated disease were processed using next-generation sequencing (NGS) methodologies by targeting RNA transcripts, and therefore detecting only replicating virus. All twelve specimens demonstrated the presence of the CPV transcriptome, with read depths ranging from 2.2X - 12,381X, genome coverage ranging from 44.8-96.5%, and representation of CPV sequencing reads to those of the metagenome background ranging from 0.0015-6.7%. Using the data generated by NGS, the presence of newly evolved, yet known, strains of both CPV-2a and CPV-2b were identified and grouped geographically. Deep-sequencing data provided additional diagnostic information in terms of investigating novel CPV in this outbreak. NGS data in addition to limited serological data provided strong diagnostic evidence that this outbreak most likely arose from unvaccinated or under-vaccinated canines, not from a novel CPV strain incapable of being neutralized by current vaccination efforts.
PubMed ID
28852158 View in PubMed
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Microbial Infections are Associated with Embryo Mortality in Arctic-nesting Geese.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263519
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Jun 5;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-2015
Author
Cristina M Hansen
Brandt W Meixell
Caroline Van Hemert
Rebekah F Hare
Karsten Hueffer
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Jun 5;
Date
Jun-5-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To address the role of bacterial infection in hatching failure of wild geese, we monitored embryo development in a breeding population of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. During 2013, we observed mortality of normally developing embryos and collected 36 addled eggs for analysis. We also collected 17 infertile eggs for comparison. Using standard culture methods and gene sequencing to identify bacteria within collected eggs, we identified a potentially novel species of Neisseria in 33 eggs, Macrococcus caseolyticus in 6 eggs, and Streptococcus uberis and Rothia nasimurium in 4 eggs each. We detected seven other bacterial species at lower frequencies. Sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from the Neisseria isolates most closely matched sequences from N. animaloris and N. canis (96-97% identity), but phylogenetic analysis suggests substantial genetic differentiation between egg isolates and known Neisseria species. Although definitive sources of the bacteria remain unknown, we detected Neisseria DNA from swabs of eggshells, nest contents, and cloacae of nesting females. To assess the pathogenicity of bacteria identified in contents of addled eggs, we inoculated isolates of Neisseria, Macrococcus, Streptococcus, and Rothia of varying concentrations into developing chicken eggs. Seven-day mortality rates varied from 70-100%, depending on bacterial species and inoculation dose. Our results provide evidence of bacterial induced embryo mortality in wild geese and in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
26048928 View in PubMed
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Neisseria arctica sp. nov. isolated from nonviable eggs of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) in Arctic Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278876
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2017 Jan 05;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-05-2017
Author
Cristina M Hansen
Elizabeth A Himschoot
Rebekah F Hare
Brandt W Meixell
Caroline Van Hemert
Karsten Hueffer
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2017 Jan 05;
Date
Jan-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
During the summers of 2013 and 2014, isolates of a novel Gram-negative coccus in the Neisseria genus were obtained from the contents of nonviable greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) eggs on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. We used a polyphasic approach to determine whether these isolates represent a novel species. 16S rRNA gene sequences, 23S rRNA gene sequences, and chaperonin 60 gene sequences suggested that these Alaskan isolates are members of a distinct species that is most closely related to Neisseria canis, N. animaloris, and N. shayeganii. Analysis of the rplF gene additionally showed that our isolates are unique and most closely related to N. weaveri. Average nucleotide identity of the whole genome sequence of our type strain was between 71.5% and 74.6% compared to close relatives, further supporting designation as a novel species. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis showed a predominance of C14:0, C16:0, and C16:1?7c fatty acids. Finally, biochemical characteristics distinguished our isolates from other Neisseria species. The name Neisseria arctica (type strain KH1503T = ATCC TSD-57T = DSM 103136T) is proposed.
PubMed ID
28056218 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.