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The care of and communication with older people from the perspective of student nurses. A mixed method study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283502
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2017 May;52:1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Lena Marmstål Hammar
Inger K Holmström
Karin Skoglund
Martina Summer Meranius
Annelie J Sundler
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2017 May;52:1-6
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Communication
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Geriatric Nursing - education
Humans
Students, Nursing - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Undergraduate nurse education needs to prepare student nurses to meet the demands and to have the necessary communication skills for caring for an increasing older population. The challenges involve how best to support and empower student nurses to learn the communication skills needed to care for older people.
The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' views on the care of and communication with older people.
A descriptive study with a mixed-method approach was conducted.
Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from a questionnaire completed by third-year Swedish student nurses in 2015.
The student nurses reported positive attitudes to the care of and communication with older people. The findings focus on the central aspects related to relationship building, techniques for communication and external prerequisites.
Despite positive attitudes, student nurses had a limited view of communication with older people. Educators need to increase student nurses' capacity to communicate effectively with older people. Educational interventions to improve and evaluate the communication competency of nurses and student nurses are needed.
PubMed ID
28214663 View in PubMed
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Monitoring and sedation differences in the management of severe head injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage among neurocritical care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106225
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2013 Dec;45(6):360-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Karin Skoglund
Per Enblad
Niklas Marklund
Author Affiliation
Questions or comments about this article may be directed to Karin Skoglund, RN ICN PhD, at karin.skoglund@neuro.uu.se. She is an Assistant Professor at the School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden. Per Enblad, PhD, is a Professor at the Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Niklas Marklund, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2013 Dec;45(6):360-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure Monitors
Brain Injuries - drug therapy - nursing
Chemokines
Critical Care Nursing - methods
Electroencephalography
Glasgow Coma Scale
Health Care Surveys
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Intensive Care - methods
Microdialysis
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods - nursing
Oximetry
Questionnaires
Scandinavia
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - drug therapy - nursing
Abstract
The emergence of specialized neurocritical care (NCC) centers has been associated with an improved survival of patients with severe traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, there are no established guidelines on sedation strategy or the frequency of evaluating the level of consciousness using the neurological wake-up test (NWT) in sedated NCC patients.
The aim was to compare the (1) monitoring techniques, (2) sedation principles, and (3) the use of the NWT in patients with severe traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid hemorrhage in 16 NCC centers.
A systematic survey of all 16 centers providing NCC in Scandinavia was performed using a questionnaire regarding the routine primary choice of sedative and analgesic compounds, monitoring techniques, and the frequency of the NWT, sent to the director of each center during 1999, 2004, and 2009.
The response rate was 100%. Except for one center in 1999, all included centers routinely used monitoring of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressure. In contrast, newer monitoring techniques such as microdialysis, jugular bulb oximetry, and brain tissue oxygenation were infrequently used throughout the survey period. Approximately half of the NCC centers used propofol infusion as the primary sedative, whereas the remaining centers used midazolam infusion, and there was a marked variation in the choice of analgesia in each evaluated year. The NWT was never used in 50% of centers and =six times daily in one center from 1999 to 2009. Most differences among the NCC centers remained unchanged over the evaluated 10-year period.
Although Scandinavian countries have similar healthcare systems, there were marked differences among the participating NCC centers in the choice of monitoring tools and sedatives and the routine use of the NWT. These differences likely reflect different clinical management traditions and a lack of evidence-based guidelines in routine NCC.
PubMed ID
24217146 View in PubMed
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The neurological wake-up test does not alter cerebral energy metabolism and oxygenation in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259955
Source
Neurocrit Care. 2014 Jun;20(3):413-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Karin Skoglund
Lars Hillered
Karlis Purins
Parmenion P Tsitsopoulos
Johanna Flygt
Henrik Engquist
Anders Lewén
Per Enblad
Niklas Marklund
Source
Neurocrit Care. 2014 Jun;20(3):413-26
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arousal - physiology
Brain - metabolism - physiopathology
Brain Injuries - diagnosis - metabolism - physiopathology
Consciousness Disorders - diagnosis - metabolism
Critical Care
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Intracranial Pressure - physiology
Jugular Veins - metabolism
Male
Microdialysis - methods
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination - methods
Oxygen - metabolism
Stress, Physiological - physiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Young Adult
Abstract
The neurological wake-up test (NWT) is used to monitor the level of consciousness in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it requires interruption of sedation and may elicit a stress response. We evaluated the effects of the NWT using cerebral microdialysis (MD), brain tissue oxygenation (PbtiO2), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and/or arterial-venous difference (AVD) for glucose, lactate, and oxygen in patients with severe TBI.
Seventeen intubated TBI patients (age 16-74 years) were sedated using continuous propofol infusion. All patients received intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) monitoring in addition to MD, PbtiO2 and/or SjvO2. Up to 10 days post-injury, ICP, CPP, PbtiO2 (51 NWTs), MD (49 NWTs), and/or SjvO2 (18 NWTs) levels during propofol sedation (baseline) and NWT were compared. MD was evaluated at a flow rate of 1.0 µL/min (28 NWTs) or the routine 0.3 µL/min rate (21 NWTs).
The NWT increased ICP and CPP levels (p 71 %; n = 2 NWTs) and PbtiO2 (
PubMed ID
23934408 View in PubMed
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Telephone nurses' use of a decision support system: An observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310147
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2019 Dec; 21(4):501-507
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Inger K Holmström
Susan Gustafsson
Josefin Wesström
Karin Skoglund
Author Affiliation
School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2019 Dec; 21(4):501-507
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - standards
Female
Hotlines - methods - trends
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology - standards - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Triage - methods - standards
Abstract
Telephone nurses give advice and support and make assessments based on verbal communication only. Web-based decision support systems are often used to increase patient safety and make medically correct assessments. The aim of the present this study was to describe factors affecting the use of a decision support system and experiences with this system among telephone nurses in Swedish primary health care. Observations and semistructured interviews were conducted. Six registered nurses with at least 1?year of experience of telephone nursing participated. Field notes and interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. The main findings of the present this study were factors that decrease the decision support system use or promote deviation from decision support system use, factors that are positive for decision support system use and the decision support system complicates the work. Underuse and deviations from decision support systems can be a safety risk, because decisions are based on too little information. Further research with observations of telephone nurses' use of decision support systems is needed to develop both telephone nursing and decision support systems.
PubMed ID
31392832 View in PubMed
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