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Cross-cultural perspectives on gerontology in nursing education - a qualitative study of nurse educators' experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309353
Source
Gerontol Geriatr Educ. 2020 Jan-Mar; 41(1):109-120
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Sirpa Rosendahl
Karin Mattsson
Nuttapol Yuwanich
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Gerontol Geriatr Educ. 2020 Jan-Mar; 41(1):109-120
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Curriculum
Education, Nursing - standards
Faculty, Nursing - psychology
Female
Geriatric Nursing - education
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Thailand
Abstract
This study focuses on nurse educators' perspectives on teaching gerontology within nursing curricula in two cultures. An increasing aging multi-cultural population with large caring needs requires not only informal elder care provided by family members, but also professional nursing staff trained in gerontology. The aim of this study was to explore how Swedish and Thai nurse educators describe the role of teaching gerontology within nursing educations in Sweden and Thailand. Method: Qualitative open-ended interviews with 13 Swedish and Thai nurse educators were conducted and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Findings: There is a lack of gerontological nursing competence in faculty, as well as bureaucracy impeding necessary changes of curricula, together with difficulties in highlighting positive and cultural aspects of aging. Conclusions: Pedagogical strategies need to be developed by nurse educators specialized in cross-cultural gerontology to improve current and future nursing educations in both countries.
PubMed ID
31319778 View in PubMed
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The diverging perception among physiotherapists of how to work with the concept of evidence: a phenomenographic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267108
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2014 Dec;20(6):759-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Åsa Snöljung
Karin Mattsson
Lena-Karin Gustafsson
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2014 Dec;20(6):759-66
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Evidence-Based Practice - ethics - methods
Female
Frail Elderly
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Male
Physical Therapists - organization & administration - psychology
Professional Competence
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
Changes in Sweden's municipal care have impacted the situation of physiotherapists by the adoption of practice based on research evidence. Even if physiotherapists appear to be in favour of the idea of evidence-based practice, barriers still exist that prevent many from keeping up with current research. The aim of this study was to identify and describe the different ways in which physiotherapists in municipal care perceive the concept of evidence in rehabilitation.
A phenomenographic design with semi-structured interviews was carried out with physiotherapists working with frail older people in three municipal care units in two neighbouring municipalities in Sweden. The physiotherapists' perceptions of evidence were explored in 12 interviews.
Distinct perceptions of the concept of evidence are identified in three categories: 'Confidence with the concept of evidence in relation to measurement instruments'; 'Perception of evidence-based practice as a duty, condition and demand of the profession'; and 'Evidence-based work as a separate rather than directly patient-oriented activity'.
Physiotherapists take full responsibility to comply with what they perceive to be the demands of their profession. However, what evidence actually meant, and therefore what the practical element of this responsibility consisted of, was not as clear.
PubMed ID
24815563 View in PubMed
Less detail