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29 records – page 1 of 3.

Antibody Levels and Protection After Hepatitis B Vaccine: Results of a 30-Year Follow-up Study and Response to a Booster Dose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282857
Source
J Infect Dis. 2016 Jul 01;214(1):16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2016
Author
Michael G Bruce
Dana Bruden
Debby Hurlburt
Carolyn Zanis
Gail Thompson
Lisa Rea
Michele Toomey
Lisa Townshend-Bulson
Karen Rudolph
Lisa Bulkow
Philip R Spradling
Richard Baum
Thomas Hennessy
Brian J McMahon
Source
J Infect Dis. 2016 Jul 01;214(1):16-22
Date
Jul-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immunity, Active - immunology
Immunization, Secondary
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The duration of protection in children and adults resulting from hepatitis B vaccination is unknown. In 1981, we immunized a cohort of 1578 Alaska Native adults and children from 15 Alaska communities aged =6 months using 3 doses of plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine.
Persons were tested for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) levels 30 years after receiving the primary series. Those with levels
PubMed ID
26802139 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial resistance among Helicobacter pylori isolates in Alaska, 2000-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292657
Source
J Glob Antimicrob Resist. 2018 Jun 30; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-30-2018
Author
Emily Mosites
Dana Bruden
Julie Morris
Alisa Reasonover
Karen Rudolph
Debra Hurlburt
Thomas Hennessy
Brian McMahon
Michael Bruce
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4055 Tudor Centre Dr, Anchorage, Alaska 99508. Electronic address: lwx7@cdc.gov.
Source
J Glob Antimicrob Resist. 2018 Jun 30; :
Date
Jun-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Alaska Native people experience a high burden of Helicobacter pylori infection and concomitant high rates of gastric cancer. Additionally, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant strains of H. pylori has been shown to be high in Alaska. We evaluated antimicrobial resistance over time among sentinel surveillance isolates and assessed risk factors for carrying resistant H. pylori.
Through Alaska's H. pylori sentinel surveillance system, we collected and cultured antral and fundal biopsies from Alaska Native patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for clinical indications during 2000-2016. For positive cultures, we performed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing for metronidazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, and levofloxacin.
We tested 800H. pylori isolates obtained from 763 patients. Metronidazole resistance was most common (342/800; 43%), followed by clarithromycin resistance (238/800; 30%), resistance to both clarithromycin and metronidazole (128/800; 16%), and levofloxacin resistance (113/800; 15%). Low proportions of isolates were resistant to amoxicillin and tetracycline. Levofloxacin resistance increased between 2000 and 2016 (p
PubMed ID
29969753 View in PubMed
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Community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with antibiotic use and the cytotoxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin during a furunculosis outbreak in rural Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6677
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 May 1;189(9):1565-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2004
Author
Henry C Baggett
Thomas W Hennessy
Karen Rudolph
Dana Bruden
Alisa Reasonover
Alan Parkinson
Rachel Sparks
Rodney M Donlan
Patricia Martinez
Kanokporn Mongkolrattanothai
Jay C Butler
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 May 1;189(9):1565-73
Date
May-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Exotoxins - metabolism
Female
Furunculosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukocidins - genetics - metabolism
Male
Methicillin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Methicillin Resistance
Population Surveillance
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Rural Population
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CO-MRSA) reports are increasing, and infections often involve soft tissue. During a CO-MRSA skin infection outbreak in Alaska, we assessed risk factors for disease and whether a virulence factor, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), could account for the high rates of MRSA skin infection in this region. METHODS: We conducted S. aureus surveillance in the outbreak region and a case-control study in 1 community, comparing 34 case patients with MRSA skin infection with 94 control subjects. An assessment of traditional saunas was performed. S. aureus isolates from regional surveillance were screened for PVL genes by use of polymerase chain reaction, and isolate relatedness was determined by use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). RESULTS: Case patients received more antibiotic courses during the 12 months before the outbreak than did control subjects (median, 4 vs. 2 courses; P=.01) and were more likely to use MRSA-colonized saunas than were control subjects (44% vs. 13%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-12). The PVL genes were present in 110 (97%) of 113 MRSA isolates, compared with 0 of 81 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates (P
PubMed ID
15116291 View in PubMed
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Effect of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae--Alaska, 2008-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105983
Source
J Infect Dis. 2014 Apr 15;209(8):1251-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2014
Author
Prabhu P Gounder
Michael G Bruce
Dana J T Bruden
Rosalyn J Singleton
Karen Rudolph
Debby A Hurlburt
Thomas W Hennessy
Jay Wenger
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Source
J Infect Dis. 2014 Apr 15;209(8):1251-8
Date
Apr-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Nasopharyngeal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Prevalence
Rural Population
Streptococcus pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Urban Population
Vaccination
Abstract
In 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced a 7-valent vaccine (PCV7) that contained all PCV7 serotypes plus 6 additional serotypes (PCV6+). We conducted annual surveys from 2008 to 2012 to determine the effect of PCV13 on colonization by pneumococcal serotypes.
We obtained nasopharyngeal swabs for pneumococcal identification and serotyping from residents of all ages at 8 rural villages and children age
PubMed ID
24273178 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in the North American Arctic, 2000-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261730
Source
J Infect. 2015 Apr 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2015
Author
Prabhu P Gounder
Tammy Zulz
Shalini Desai
Flemming Stenz
Karen Rudolph
Raymond Tsang
Gregory J Tyrrell
Michael G Bruce
Source
J Infect. 2015 Apr 10;
Date
Apr-10-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To determine the incidence of meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the North American Arctic during 2000-2010.
Surveillance data were obtained from the International Circumpolar Surveillance network. We defined a case of bacterial meningitis caused by H. influenzae, N. meningitidis, or S. pneumoniae as a culture-positive isolate obtained from a normally sterile site in a resident with a meningitis diagnosis.
The annual incidence/100,000 persons for meningitis caused by H. influenzae, N. meningitidis, and S. pneumoniae among all North American Arctic residents was: 0.6, 0.5, and 1.5, respectively; the meningitis incidence among indigenous persons in Alaska and Canada (indigenous status not recorded in Greenland) for those three bacteria was: 2.1, 0.8, and 2.4, respectively. The percentage of pneumococcal isolates belonging to a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotype declined from 2000-2004 to 2005-2010 (31%-2%, p-value
PubMed ID
25864638 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease in Alaska, 2001 - 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267672
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2015 Nov 11;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-11-2015
Author
Karen Rudolph
Michael G Bruce
Dana Bruden
Tammy Zulz
Alisa Reasonover
Debby Hurlburt
Thomas Hennessy
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2015 Nov 11;
Date
Nov-11-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The Arctic Investigations Program (AIP) began surveillance for invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections in Alaska in 2000 as part of the invasive bacterial diseases population-based laboratory surveillance program. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 516 cases of GAS reported, for an overall annual incidence of 5.8 cases per 100,000 persons with 56 deaths (case-fatality ratio, 10.7%). Of the 516 confirmed cases of invasive GAS, 422 (82%) had isolates available for laboratory analysis. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime and levofloxacin. Resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin was seen in 11% (n=8), 5.8% (n=20) and 1.2% (n=4) of the isolates, respectively. A total of 51 emm types were identified, of which emm1 (11.1%) was the most prevalent followed by emm82 (8.8%), emm49 (7.8%), emm12 and emm3 (6.6% each), emm89 (6.2%), emm108 (5.5%), emm28 (4.7%), emm92 (4%) and emm41 (3.8%). The five most common emm types accounted for 41% of isolates. The emm types in the proposed 26-valent and 30-valent vaccines accounted for 56% and 78% of all cases, respectively. GAS remains an important cause of invasive bacterial disease in Alaska. Continued surveillance of GAS infections will help improve understanding of the epidemiology of invasive disease, with impact on disease control, notification of outbreaks, and vaccine development.
PubMed ID
26560536 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of pneumococcal serotype 6A and 6C among invasive and carriage isolates from Alaska, 1986-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117652
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Mar;75(3):271-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Karen Rudolph
Michael Bruce
Dana Bruden
Tammy Zulz
Jay Wenger
Alisa Reasonover
Marcella Harker-Jones
Debby Hurlburt
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Mar;75(3):271-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Carrier State - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Penicillins - pharmacology
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Rural Population
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
We investigated serotype 6A/6C invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence, genetic diversity, and carriage before and after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction in Alaska. IPD cases (1986-2009) were identified through population-based laboratory surveillance. Isolates were initially serotyped by conventional methods, and 6C isolates were differentiated from 6A by polymerase chain reaction. Among invasive and carriage isolates initially typed as 6A, 35% and 50% were identified as 6C, respectively. IPD rates caused by serotype 6A or 6C among children
PubMed ID
23276772 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of serum bactericidal antibody assays for Haemophilus influenzae serotype a.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138420
Source
Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2011 Feb;18(2):243-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Nadine G Rouphael
Sarah Satola
Monica M Farley
Karen Rudolph
Daniel S Schmidt
Patricia Gomez-de-León
John B Robbins
Rachel Schneerson
George M Carlone
Sandra Romero-Steiner
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, 69 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30303, USA.
Source
Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2011 Feb;18(2):243-7
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacteriological Techniques - methods
Canada
Colony Count, Microbial
Fluorometry - methods
Haemophilus Infections - immunology
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Microbial Viability
Middle Aged
Oxazines - metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Serum Bactericidal Antibody Assay - methods
Xanthenes - metabolism
Abstract
Haemophilus influenzae type a (Hia) is an important pathogen for some American Indian, Alaskan native, and Northern Canada aboriginal populations. Assays to measure serum bactericidal activity (SBA) to Hia have not been developed or validated. Here, we describe two methods for the measurement of SBA: SBA with a viability endpoint (CFU counts) and SBA with a fluorometric endpoint using alamarBlue as the metabolic indicator. Both SBA assays measure Hia-specific functional antibody and correlate with anti-Hia IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) concentration of naturally acquired antibodies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21177919 View in PubMed
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Factors affecting antimicrobial resistance among colonising Streptococcus pneumoniae in rural Alaska villages over 10 years

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284366
Source
Pages 702-703 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):702-703
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Christina Hedlund
Dana Bruden
Michael Bruce
Debby Hurlburt
Karen Rudolph
Alan Parkinson
Birgitta Evengard
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Division for Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea, Sweden
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Anchorage, AK, USA
Source
Pages 702-703 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):702-703
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Haemophilus influenzae serotype a invasive disease, Alaska, USA, 1983-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113357
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jun;19(6):932-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael G Bruce
Tammy Zulz
Carolynn DeByle
Ros Singleton
Debby Hurlburt
Dana Bruden
Karen Rudolph
Thomas Hennessy
Joseph Klejka
Jay D Wenger
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99507, USA. zwa8@cdc.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jun;19(6):932-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Geography
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - history
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - genetics
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Middle Aged
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Public Health Surveillance
Serotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
Before introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines, rates of Hib disease in Alaska's indigenous people were among the highest in the world. Vaccination reduced rates dramatically; however, invasive H. influenzae type a (Hia) disease has emerged. Cases of invasive disease were identified through Alaska statewide surveillance during 1983-2011. Of 866 isolates analyzed for serotype, 32 (4%) were Hia. No Hia disease was identified before 2002; 32 cases occurred during 2002-2011 (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23735653 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.