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Advantages and disadvantages of an objective selection process for early intervention in employees at risk for sickness absence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77830
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Duijts Saskia F A
Kant Ijmert
Swaen Gerard M H
Author Affiliation
Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht, The Netherlands. sfa.duijts@epid.unimaas.nl
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:67
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Occupational Health Services
Patient Selection
Preventive Health Services
Randomized Controlled Trials - methods
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Selection Bias
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is unclear if objective selection of employees, for an intervention to prevent sickness absence, is more effective than subjective 'personal enlistment'. We hypothesize that objectively selected employees are 'at risk' for sickness absence and eligible to participate in the intervention program. METHODS: The dispatch of 8603 screening instruments forms the starting point of the objective selection process. Different stages of this process, throughout which employees either dropped out or were excluded, were described and compared with the subjective selection process. Characteristics of ineligible and ultimately selected employees, for a randomized trial, were described and quantified using sickness absence data. RESULTS: Overall response rate on the screening instrument was 42.0%. Response bias was found for the parameters sex and age, but not for sickness absence. Sickness absence was higher in the 'at risk' (N = 212) group (42%) compared to the 'not at risk' (N = 2503) group (25%) (OR 2.17 CI 1.63-2.89; p = 0.000). The selection process ended with the successful inclusion of 151 eligible, i.e. 2% of the approached employees in the trial. CONCLUSION: The study shows that objective selection of employees for early intervention is effective. Despite methodological and practical problems, selected employees are actually those at risk for sickness absence, who will probably benefit more from the intervention program than others.
PubMed ID
17474980 View in PubMed
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