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Diagnosis of depressed young people--criterion validity of WHO-5 and HSCL-6 in Denmark and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270250
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):359-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Kaj S Christensen
Wenche Haugen
Manjit K Sirpal
Ole Rikard Haavet
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):359-63
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - standards - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
General Practice - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological - methods - standards
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway - epidemiology
Psychometrics
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
World Health Organization
Abstract
According to the World Health Organization, depression ranks as a major contributor to the global burden of disease. A large proportion of adult depressions had their first appearance in adolescence. Brief and reliable rating scales are needed for early detection.
The aim of this study is to validate the WHO-5 and the HSCL-6 for detection of depression among adolescents.
The project is a GP multicentre study conducted in Denmark and Norway. A total of 294 adolescents (14-16 years) responded by answering a paper- or web-based questionnaire and later completed a Composite International Diagnostic Interview, which was used as the gold standard. Depression was defined by ICD-10 criteria. Criterion validity was examined, the likelihood ratios measured and cut-offs for depression were calculated using the Youden index.
The prevalence of depression was 11.8% in our sample. The optimal cut-off point was 11 for the WHO-5 test and 9 for the HSCL-6 test. There were no gender differences. For the WHO-5 and the HSCL-6, respectively, the sensitivity was 0.88 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-0.96] and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.70-0.94), the specificity was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.75-0.85) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.74-0.84) and the likelihood ratio was 4.5 and 3.8 (P = 0.39). We observed no statistically significant diagnostic differences with respect to nationality or administration procedure.
The WHO-5 and the HSCL-6 may both serve as valid case finding instruments for depression in young people in primary care.
PubMed ID
25800246 View in PubMed
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The patients' illness perceptions and the use of primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70485
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):997-1005
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lisbeth Frostholm
Per Fink
Kaj S Christensen
Tomas Toft
Eva Oernboel
Frede Olesen
John Weinman
Author Affiliation
Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. frost@as.aaa.dk
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):997-1005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory
Primary Health Care - utilization
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Role
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate if primary care patients' perceptions of a current health problem were associated with use of health care. METHOD: One thousand seven hundred eighty-five patients presenting a new health problem to 1 of 38 physicians from 28 general practices in Aarhus County, Denmark. Patients completed a questionnaire on their illness perceptions and emotional distress before the consultation. The physicians completed a questionnaire for each patient on diagnostics and prognostics. Register data on primary health care utilization 3 years before and 2 years after baseline were obtained. Odds ratios were estimated to examine associations between previous health care use and illness perceptions. Linear regression analysis was performed to examine if illness perceptions predicted later health care use. RESULTS: Previous use: Higher use was associated with psychosocial, stress, and lifestyle attributions. Accident/chance attributions were associated with higher use for patients with a chronic disorder but with lower use for patients without a chronic disorder. A strong illness identity (number of self-reported symptoms), illness worry, a long timeline perspective, a belief that the symptoms would have serious consequences, and all emotional distress variables were associated with higher use. Use during follow-up: Infection/lowered immunity attributions were associated with higher use for patients with a chronic disorder, whereas psychosocial and lifestyle attributions were associated with higher use for all patients. Illness worry and all emotional distress variables predicted higher health care use. A strong illness identity, a long timeline perspective, a belief in serious consequences, and stress and accident/chance attributions were among the strongest predictors of health care use in a multivariate model including all variables. CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perceptions of a current health problem are associated with health care use and may offer an obvious starting point for a biopsychosocial approach in primary care.
PubMed ID
16314606 View in PubMed
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The uncertain consultation and patient satisfaction: the impact of patients' illness perceptions and a randomized controlled trial on the training of physicians' communication skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70486
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):897-905
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lisbeth Frostholm
Per Fink
Eva Oernboel
Kaj S Christensen
Tomas Toft
Frede Olesen
John Weinman
Author Affiliation
Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark.
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):897-905
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Communication
Comparative Study
Family Practice - education - methods - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Research
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient satisfaction
Personality Inventory
Physicians - psychology - standards
Prognosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - standards
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Teaching
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of patient satisfaction among a range of patient and practitioner variables. In particular, to focus on patients' illness perceptions and the impact of a randomized controlled trial on the training of physicians in general communication skills and how to treat patients presenting with poorly defined illness. METHODS: A randomized controlled follow-up study conducted in 28 general practices in Aarhus County, Denmark. Half of the physicians were randomized into an educational program on treatment of patients presenting with medically unexplained symptoms (somatization). One thousand seven hundred eighty-five general practice attenders presenting a new health problem completed questionnaires on illness perceptions, physical functioning, and mental distress before the consultation. After the consultation, a questionnaire including relational and communicative domains of patient satisfaction with the current consultation was completed. The physicians completed a questionnaire for each patient on diagnostics and prognostics. Predictors of patient satisfaction were determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: A large number of patient and practitioner variables predicted satisfaction in univariate logistic regression models. Results from a multivariate logistic model showed that the illness perceptions "uncertainty" (patient not knowing what is wrong) and "emotional representations" (the complaint making the patient feel worried, depressed, helpless, afraid, hopeless) predicted dissatisfaction at OR (CI) = 1.8 (1.3-2.4), p
PubMed ID
16314594 View in PubMed
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