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Effects of a population-based smoking cessation programme on smoking in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192104
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):446-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
N. Jaakkola
K. Zahlsen
J J Jaakkola
Author Affiliation
Environmental Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):446-9
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
National Health Programs
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prenatal Care
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A controlled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity population-based smoking cessation programme in maternity care clinics. Quitting smoking during pregnancy was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire and verified by hair nicotine concentration. In the intervention area, 58/306 women (19.0%) reported quitting smoking during pregnancy whereas in the reference area the numbers were 22/152 (14.5%) (difference = 4.5%, 95% confidence interval: -2.6%-11.6%). The intervention group indicated that they received more information on adverse effects of smoking, studied the material more actively, and felt that material from maternity care influenced their smoking behaviour more than the reference group.
PubMed ID
11766488 View in PubMed
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Fetal growth and length of gestation in relation to prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke assessed by hair nicotine concentration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49207
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Jun;109(6):557-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
J J Jaakkola
N. Jaakkola
K. Zahlsen
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Program, The Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden. jouni.jaakkola@nhv.se
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Jun;109(6):557-61
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Female
Ganglionic Stimulants - analysis
Gestational Age
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Middle Aged
Nicotine - analysis
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
We assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke on fetal growth and length of gestation. The study population consisted of 389 nonsmoking women who were selected from a population-based study in southeast Finland on the basis of questionnaire information after delivery (response rate 94%). The final exposure assessment was based on nicotine concentration of maternal hair sampled after the delivery, which measures exposure during the past 2 months (i.e., the third trimester). The exposure categories were defined a priori as high (nicotine concentration [Greater and equal to] 4.00 microg/g; n = 52), medium (0.75 to
PubMed ID
11445507 View in PubMed
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In vitro screening for metabolic interactions among frequently occurring binary mixtures of volatile organic chemicals in Norwegian occupational atmosphere.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75037
Source
Pharmacol Toxicol. 1998 Aug;83(2):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
B. Mortensen
P O Osvoll
T. Woldbaek
K. Zahlsen
I. Eide
O G Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Medical Technical Center, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Pharmacol Toxicol. 1998 Aug;83(2):49-56
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - pharmacology
Animals
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - metabolism
Drug Interactions
In Vitro
Male
Microsomes, Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Norway
Organ Size - drug effects
Organic Chemicals - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - metabolism
Toxicity Tests
Volatilization
Abstract
Surveys of Norwegian industrial occupational atmosphere between 1983 to 1996, have identified the 12 most frequent occurring binary combinations of volatile organic chemicals. These combinations were tested in vitro for mutual inhibition or enhancement of metabolism by the head space vial equilibration technique with liver S9 obtained from in vivo untreated or pretreated (with the binary mixture) rats. The in vitro system responded to in vivo pretreatment by increasing the metabolic rate of several potentially toxic organic chemicals such as toluene, xylene, styrene, and dichloromethane. In untreated liver S9, the metabolism of several of the tested binary pairs was inhibited when coexposed in vitro to their most prevalent follower as shown for instance for ethanol (with ethyl acetate), dichloromethane (with styrene) and mutually between toluene and xylene. This inhibitory effect disappeared, however, for several of the solvents when combined with the in vivo induced liver S9, a situation which may be the most relevant for occupational exposure. It is concluded that several metabolic interactions occur between low-molecular weight volatile chemicals found in occupational air. These are both inductive and inhibitory in nature and a further mechanistic evaluation including a higher number of differentiated dosage levels, must be performed before a possible health hazard can be confirmed or rejected for the investigated combinations.
PubMed ID
9783320 View in PubMed
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