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Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero and the risk of stillbirth and death in the first year of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10176
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug 15;154(4):322-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2001
Author
K. Wisborg
U. Kesmodel
T B Henriksen
S F Olsen
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. skejkw@aau.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug 15;154(4):322-7
Date
Aug-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors examined the association between exposure to tobacco smoke in utero and the risk of stillbirth and infant death in a cohort of 25,102 singleton children of pregnant women scheduled to deliver at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from September 1989 to August 1996. Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero was associated with an increased risk of stillbirth (odds ratio = 2.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 2.9), and infant mortality was almost doubled in children born to women who had smoked during pregnancy compared with children of nonsmokers (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 2.6). Among children of women who stopped smoking during the first trimester, stillbirth and infant mortality was comparable with that in children of women who had been nonsmokers from the beginning of pregnancy. Conclusions were not changed after adjustment in a logistic regression model for the sex of the child; parity; or maternal age, height, weight, marital status, years of education, occupational status, and alcohol and caffeine intake during pregnancy. Approximately 25% of all stillbirths and 20% of all infant deaths in a population with 30% pregnant smokers could be avoided if all pregnant smokers stopped smoking by the sixteenth week of gestation.
PubMed ID
11495855 View in PubMed
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IVF and stillbirth: a prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97934
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 May;25(5):1312-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
K. Wisborg
H J Ingerslev
T B Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Brendstrugaardsvej 100, Skejby, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 May;25(5):1312-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility - therapy
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Prospective Studies
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - adverse effects
Risk factors
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - adverse effects
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that the risk of stillbirth is increased in singleton pregnancies achieved after assisted reproduction technology (ART). However, no previous study fully accounted for factors with potential influence on the risk of stillbirth. Further, whether fertility treatment, the possible reproductive pathology of the infertile couples or other characteristics related to being subfertile may explain a possible association with stillbirth remains unclear. This study compares the risk of stillbirth in women pregnant after fertility treatment (IVF/ICSI and non-IVF ART) and subfertile women with that in fertile women. METHODS: We used prospectively collected data from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark and included information about 20 166 singleton pregnancies (1989-2006). Outcome measure was stillbirth. RESULTS: The risk of stillbirth in women who conceived after IVF/ICSI was 16.2 per thousand ( per thousand) and in women who conceived after non-IVF ART 2.3 per thousand. In fertile and subfertile women, the risk of stillbirth was 3.7 per thousand and 5.4 per thousand, respectively. Compared with fertile women, women who conceived after IVF/ICSI had more than four times the risk of stillbirth [odds ratio (OR): 4.44, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.38-8.28], and adjustments for maternal age, BMI, education, smoking habits and alcohol and coffee intake during pregnancy had only minor impact on the findings (OR: 4.08; 95% CI: 2.11-7.93). The risk of stillbirth in women who conceived after non-IVF ART and in women who conceived spontaneously with a waiting time to pregnancy of a year or more was not significantly different from the risk in women with a shorter time to pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with fertile women, women who conceived by IVF/ICSI had an increased risk of stillbirth that was not explained by confounding. Our results indicate that the increased risk of stillbirth seen after fertility treatment is a result of the fertility treatment or unknown factors pertaining to couples who undergo IVF/ICSI.
PubMed ID
20179321 View in PubMed
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Maternal smoking and gestational age in twin pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10136
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):926-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
K. Wisborg
T B Henriksen
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. skejkw@aau.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):926-30
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Gestational Age
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Twins
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A twin pregnancy imposes greater demands on maternal physiology and smoking may thus be associated theoretically with a greater risk of preterm delivery than in singleton pregnancies. POPULATION AND METHODS: From 1989 to 1996 all women who booked for antenatal care at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark were asked to fill in two questionnaires. Apart from smoking habits, these questionnaires provided information on medical and obstetric history together with information on sociodemographic and other lifestyle variables. Gestational age at delivery was calculated from ultrasonographically determined fetal biparietal diameter and information about the last menstrual period. Only women carrying twins were included in the present study (n=401). RESULTS: Mean gestational age was 5 days (95% CI 1-9 days) shorter among smokers compared with non-smokers. Among non-smokers mean gestational age was 261 days (+/-18), among women who smoked 1-9 and 10+ cigarettes per day 257 days (+/-23) and 255 days (+/-20), respectively. The overall risk of preterm delivery (
PubMed ID
11580737 View in PubMed
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A prospective intervention study of stopping smoking in pregnancy in a routine antenatal care setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64148
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1998 Nov;105(11):1171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
K. Wisborg
T B Henriksen
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1998 Nov;105(11):1171-6
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Intervention Studies
Midwifery - education
Mothers - education
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of specific education of midwives on stopping smoking in pregnant women and to determine the effect of this programme on pregnancy outcome. DESIGN: A prospective intervention study. SETTING: Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. POPULATION AND METHODS: A group of midwives (9 out of 54) was taught the effects of smoking during pregnancy and instructed in various methods of educating women to stop smoking. All pregnant women who attended antenatal care from October 1994 to September 1995 were either in the intervention group (n = 527) or the control group (n = 2629). Pregnant women attending the specifically educated midwives were considered to be the intervention group. They were given individual advice about stopping smoking at the first antenatal visit at about 16 weeks of gestation and a leaflet on smoking and pregnancy. RESULTS: At the first antenatal visit at about 16 weeks of gestation, 22% of the pregnant women smoked. Between the first visit and the routine visit at 30 weeks of gestation 51 (2%) stopped smoking and 56 (2%) started smoking. No differences were found between the intervention group and the control group in the rate of stopping smoking, validated by cotinine measurements. Mean birthweight, mean gestational age and the proportion of preterm birth in the two groups were similar. CONCLUSION: Education of midwives and integration of advice about smoking cessation at a low cost in routine antenatal care failed to affect smoking habits among pregnant women.
PubMed ID
9853765 View in PubMed
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[Smoking among pregnant women and the significance of sociodemographic factors on smoking cessation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11219
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Jun 24;158(26):3784-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-1996
Author
K. Wisborg
T B Henriksen
M. Hedegaard
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Gynaekologisk-obstetrisk afdeling Y, Arhus Kommunehospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Jun 24;158(26):3784-8
Date
Jun-24-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Smoking - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In order to describe smoking habits among pregnant women and predictors of smoking cessation all pregnant women attending routine antenatal care from 1989 to 1991 at the Department of Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, were asked to fill in questionnaires. Information about smoking habits from 8806 women revealed that 44% smoked prior to pregnancy. One fifth of the smokers stopped smoking early in pregnancy, leaving 33% women smoking during pregnancy. The strongest predictor of smoking cessation was the number of cigarettes smoked prior to pregnancy, where those that smoked the least were most likely to give up smoking. Caffeine intake, parity, years of education, and partner's smoking habits were also associated with smoking cessation whereas social status, alcohol intake, marital status, and age of the women had no influence on smoking cessation. Thus, a strategy for a smoking cessation campaign among pregnant women could be directed towards women who smoke heavily prior to pregnancy and women with a high daily intake of caffeine.
PubMed ID
8686075 View in PubMed
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Smoking during pregnancy and infantile colic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10178
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Aug;108(2):342-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
C. Søndergaard
T B Henriksen
C. Obel
K. Wisborg
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiologic Science Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark. cos@dadlnet.dk
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Aug;108(2):342-6
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Colic - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Marital status
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Puerperal Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and infantile colic (IC). METHODS: A follow-up study of singleton infants delivered by Danish mothers at the Aarhus University Hospital from May 1991 to February 1992 and still living in the municipality of Aarhus at the age of 8 months was conducted. A total of 1820 mothers and their infants were included. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data on smoking, other lifestyle factors, and sociodemographic variables at 16 and 30 weeks of gestation and 8 months postpartum. IC was defined in the 8-month questionnaire and based on Wessel's criteria, except that we used only the crying criterion. RESULTS: IC was seen in 10.8% of all infants. We observed a twofold increased risk of IC among infants whose mothers smoked 15 or more cigarettes per day during their pregnancy(relative risk: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-3.2) or in the postpartum period (relative risk: 2.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.3-3.1). Women who smoked continuously during pregnancy and the postpartum period had a relative risk of 1.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.1-2.0) of having a infant with IC compared with women who did not smoke during this period. Adjustment for maternal age, parity, marital status, alcohol intake, birth weight, gestational age, breastfeeding, caffeine intake postpartum, and paternal smoking did not change the effect measures. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that maternal smoking during pregnancy may increase the risk of IC.
PubMed ID
11483798 View in PubMed
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Smoking during pregnancy and preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11199
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1996 Aug;103(8):800-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
K. Wisborg
T B Henriksen
M. Hedegaard
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1996 Aug;103(8):800-5
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height
Body Weight
Caffeine - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Logistic Models
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between smoking during pregnancy and preterm birth. DESIGN: A follow up study. SETTING: Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Four thousand one hundred and eleven nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies who returned questionnaires about smoking habits at 16 weeks of gestation. RESULTS: The overall rate of preterm delivery was 4.3%. Smokers had a 40% higher risk of preterm birth compared with nonsmokers. A dose response relationship was found between smoking and risk of preterm birth. Adjustment for women's height, prepregnancy weight, age of the mother, marital status, education, occupational status, and alcohol intake did not change the results. Among women with an intake of less than 400 mg of caffeine per day no difference in the risk of preterm birth between smokers and nonsmokers was found. However, among women with an intake of more than 400 mg of caffeine per day, the risk of preterm birth was increased almost threefold among smokers compared with nonsmokers. Furthermore, among women with a high intake of caffeine a dose-response relationship was found; women smoking one to five cigarettes per day had no increased risk of preterm birth compared with nonsmokers with the same intake of caffeine, women smoking six to ten cigarettes per day had almost three times higher risk of preterm birth, and women smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day had almost five times higher risk of preterm birth compared with nonsmokers with the same intake of caffeine. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking increases the risk of preterm birth. The association between smoking and preterm birth was only present among women with a high intake of caffeine. However, whether smoking alone influences the risk of preterm birth among heavy consumers of caffeine needs further investigation.
PubMed ID
8760711 View in PubMed
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Smoking habits among Danish pregnant women from 1989 to 1996 in relation to sociodemographic and lifestyle factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64176
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1998 Sep;77(8):836-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
K. Wisborg
T B Henriksen
M. Hedegaard
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1998 Sep;77(8):836-40
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caffeine - adverse effects
Demography
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to describe changes in smoking habits among Danish pregnant women during an eight-year period in relation to changes in sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. METHODS: From 1989 to 1996 all pregnant women attending routine antenatal care at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Aarhus University Hospital who completed an inclusion questionnaire were invited to participate in the present study (n=27,194). They were asked to complete two additional questionnaires during pregnancy. Apart from smoking habits. these questionnaires provided information on medical and obstetric history together with information on sociodemographic and other lifestyle variables. RESULTS: The proportion of pregnant smokers decreased from 34% (95% CI: 32%/36%) in 1989 to 21% (95% CI: 19%-22%) in 1996 (p
PubMed ID
9776597 View in PubMed
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[Strategies for smoking cessation among pregnant women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64694
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Jul 11;156(28):4119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-1994
Author
K. Wisborg
C. Obel
T B Henriksen
M. Hedegaard
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Arhus Kommunehospital, perinatal epidemiologisk forskningsenhed, gynaekologisk-obstetrisk afdeling Y.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Jul 11;156(28):4119-24
Date
Jul-11-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials
Counseling
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Randomized Controlled Trials
Self Care
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
Smoking during pregnancy is harmful to the health of the fetus and the newborn. Smoking increases the risk of low birthweight, preterm delivery and perinatal death. In developed countries smoking during pregnancy is regarded as the single most important risk factor for which it is possible to intervene. We reviewed the Scandinavian and English randomized controlled intervention studies directed towards smoking cessation during pregnancy. The intervention studies were classified according to the method of intervention namely antismoking advice, self-help manuals, measurements of smoking dependent chemical factors and multifactorial methods. We conclude that it is possible to reduce smoking during pregnancy only by an efficient and personal effort performed by a committed person towards each pregnant woman.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 14;156(46):6881-27839509
PubMed ID
8066906 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.