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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Bacteriological and X-ray status of tuberculosis following primary infection acquired during adolescence or later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249530
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc. 1977 Oct;52:5-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1977
Source
Pneumologie. 1994 Feb;48(2):151-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
K. Styblo
C. Ferlinz
Author Affiliation
Deutsches Zentralkomitee zur Bekämpfung der Tuberkulose III. Med. Universitätsklinik-Pneumologie, Mainz.
Source
Pneumologie. 1994 Feb;48(2):151-5
Date
Feb-1994
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Netherlands - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
It is evident from follow-up studies of tuberculosis in the Netherlands (without BCG vaccination), Sweden (discontinuation of BCG vaccination since 1975) and in both parts of Germany (FRG discontinuation since 1975), as well as from the favourable tuberculosis situation in both parts of Germany (low tuberculosis incidence and very low infection risk) that general vaccination of babies is no longer warranted. For this reason the German Central Committee for Combatting Tuberculosis is considering in consultation with the Federal Bureau of Health to abstain from continuing to recommend general BCG vaccination of all newborn. BCG vaccination should be recommended only in enhanced-risk groups (children of foreign parents and children sharing their living quarters or household with a person suffering from acute, i.e. infectious tuberculosis).
PubMed ID
8183867 View in PubMed
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Contacts of cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252615
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc. 1975;50(1):90-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975

The epidemiology and control of tuberculosis in developed countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254831
Source
Ther Umsch. 1973 Mar;30(3):199-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1973

Impact of BCG vaccination programmes in children and young adults on the tuberculosis problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42345
Source
Tubercle. 1976 Mar;57(1):17-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1976
Author
K. Styblo
J. Meijer
Source
Tubercle. 1976 Mar;57(1):17-43
Date
Mar-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
BCG Vaccine
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Norway
Public Health
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - prevention & control
Abstract
There is general agreement that BCG vaccination with a potent strain, when given to previously uninfected subjects, is highly effective in preventing the development to tuberculosis among them. This "direct" effect may be measured in practice in terms of the proportion of cases prevented in the age-groups in which the vaccination has been made. It is also clamined that mass BCG vaccination-especially at school-leaving age-can be expected to yield benefits not only directly, but also indirectly, by breaking the chain of transmission and so preventing the development of tuberculosis in unvaccinated subjects. This "indirect" effect may be measured, by analogy, in terms of the reduction in the numbers of cases in the age groups in which no vaccinations have been performed (the older age groups, and also young children, if BCG vaccination is given, for instance, to school-leavers). The indirect effect will be observed in terms of changes in both smear-positive and smear-negative cases. However, because smear-positive cases are the principal sources of infection, it is more meaningful to measure the indirect effect in terms of the reduction in the numbers of smear-positive (infectious) cases. The present paper falls into three parts: I. A comparison of the trends in the incidence of infectious tuberculosis in Norway, Denmark and The Netherlands. The study confirms that the substantial direct effect of BCG vaccination on the total tuberculosis incidence, which was shown by Bjartveit and Waaler, also applies to the incidence of infectious tuberculosis. II. A comparison of the trends in the incidence of infectious tuberculosis in the three countries and in different age groups over 30, and in the incidence of all forms of tuberculosis in children, in whom BCG vaccination has not been used. These comparisons suggest that the indirect effect of BCG on infectious cases of tuberculosis in persons aged 30 years and over, and on all forms of tuberculosis in children, in whom BCG vaccination has not been used, is not readily detectable, and so may not be large. However, the trends in tuberculosis incidence measure the total effects of all the policies for control used in the three countries under study. The comparisons between the three countries can therefore not isolate the "pure" direct and indirect effects of BCG from the effects of other differences between the control policies. For this reason a theoretical study of the problem has been made. III. A theoretical examination of the maximum likely indirect effect of a mass BCG vaccination policy in diminishing the prevalence of sources of infection in the population. This shows that the effect of BCG in preventing smear-positive cases in developing countries (if a constant risk of infection of about 3 per cent is presumed), is between 0.3 per cent and 2.0 per cent per year. This effect depends mainly upon the efficacy of BCG vaccine, the population covered and the duration of protection from BCG vaccination...
PubMed ID
1085050 View in PubMed
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[Impact of the present control measures on the problem of tuberculosis (author's transl)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6484
Source
Plucne Bolesti Tuberk. 1978 Oct-Dec;30(4):299-306
Publication Type
Article

[Sensitivity to tuberculin in Swedish schoolboys vaccinated with BCG at birth]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40946
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc. 1980 Sep-Dec;55(3-4):101-6
Publication Type
Article

[The current risk of contracting evolutive tuberculosis, in Saskatchewan, according to the state of previous tuberculin tests and x-ray image].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256004
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc. 1971 Nov;45:55-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1971
Source
Archives of Environmental Health. 1072 Nov; 25(5):329-332.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
Author
S. Grzybowski
J D Galbraith
K. Styblo
M. Chan-Yeung
E. Dorken
A. Brown
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia
Source
Archives of Environmental Health. 1072 Nov; 25(5):329-332.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Tuberculin sensitivity
Epidemics
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
BCG Vaccine
Bacteriological Techniques
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Male
Sex Factors
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1747.
PubMed ID
4568562 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.