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Assessment of physical activity by questionnaire and personal interview with particular reference to fitness and coronary mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50371
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1987;56(3):245-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
R. Mundal
J. Erikssen
K. Rodahl
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1987;56(3):245-52
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Evaluation Studies
Exertion
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Norway
Physical Fitness
Questionnaires
Abstract
Physical work capacity was measured by means of a symptom limited, near maximal cycle ergometer exercise test in two populations: a random sample of 95 military officers, and 2014 apparently healthy working males, 40-59 years old. Physical activity during leisure hours was assessed by means of a standardized questionnaire and by a personal interview with the officers and with 1769 of the other men. A 3 year total incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) was recorded in the case of the officers and a 7 year CHD incidence and of CHD deaths was obtained for the 2014 working men. The data show that: A marked underestimation of the habitual levels of physical activity of the officers was obtained from the standardized questionnaire, as compared with that shown by the interview data. A far better agreement between the questionnaire and interview data on leisure time activity was observed among the mainly sedentary men. Physical work capacity was fairly well predicted from the questionnaire data in the sedentary men, but poorly predicted in the officers. CHD mortality in the sedentary men was highly correlated with working capacity in all age groups. Of 58 who died from CHD, 28 belonged to the lowest physical fitness quartile. This study indicates that questionnaires should be used with caution when assessing levels of habitual physical activity. It also suggests that a low physical work capacity is an important risk factor in CHD mortality.
PubMed ID
3569233 View in PubMed
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[Blood pressure elevation among industrial workers exposed to stress].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228362
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 20;110(22):2873-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1990
Author
J. Erikssen
K. Knudsen
P. Mowinckel
T. Guthe
J P Holm
R. Brandtzaeg
K. Rodahl
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Sentralsykehuset i Akershus, Nordbyhagen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 20;110(22):2873-7
Date
Sep-20-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Hypertension - etiology - psychology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Diseases - etiology - psychology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Stress, Physiological
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
A standardized, annual medical examination of a group of heat workers exposed to, and another group not exposed to heat in a Norwegian ferro-alloy plant over a period of six years showed no statistically significant difference in blood pressure between the two groups. However, following three years of stable blood pressure and heart rates, both parameters increased markedly in both groups. The occurrence of this sudden increase in blood pressure coincided with the plant being threatened with the possibility of closure due to inability to operate at a profit. This threat persisted for more than two years, but even afterwards, when it was quite clear that jobs at the plant were no longer threatened, the blood pressure remained markedly elevated. These findings emphasize the importance of being aware of the possible relationship between prolonged mental stress and hypertension.
PubMed ID
2219064 View in PubMed
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Coronary heart disease in Norwegian sea-pilots: part of the occupational hazard?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50427
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1981;645:79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
J. Erikssen
A H Johansen
K. Rodahl
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1981;645:79-83
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aircraft
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Risk
Abstract
A near maximal bicycle exercise test revealed a prevalence of positive exercise ECG's of 8/68 among apparently healthy sea-pilots and 93/2014 among apparently healthy men of comparable age in Oslo (P less than 0.01). This difference could not be explained in terms of differences in commonly accepted coronary heart disease risk factors (cholesterol/triglycerides, smoking habits and blood pressure). Reasons for the difference should be sought in the working environment of the pilots as well as in possible unfavourable life habits adapted during leisure time as indicated by a relative increase in body weight and somewhat lower working capacity in pilots than in age matched counterparts from Oslo.
PubMed ID
6940426 View in PubMed
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Factors preceding the onset of meningococcal disease, with special emphasis on passive smoking, symptoms of ill health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39995
Source
NIPH Ann. 1983 Dec;6(2):169-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
B. Haneberg
T. Tønjum
K. Rodahl
T W Gedde-Dahl
Source
NIPH Ann. 1983 Dec;6(2):169-73
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Female
Health
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - etiology
Meningococcal Infections - etiology
Norway
Physical Fitness
Prospective Studies
Risk
Septicemia - etiology
Time Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In a prospective study of 115 patients with systemic meningococcal disease, 61 control patients and 293 population controls, environmental and other factors which preceded the illness and which might have influenced the acquisition and case fatality rate of the meningococcal disease were investigated. Passive smoking in children under 12 year of age, stressful events, and symptoms and signs of preceding illness within the last two weeks were significantly more frequent in meningococcal patients than among the population controls. In contrast, those patients who had been exposed to stressful events, or who had symptoms or signs of ill-health preceding the meningococcal disease, had significantly reduced case fatality rates as compared to those who had not had any such experiences. Passive smoking remains a factor of great interest for further studies and intervention.
PubMed ID
6676682 View in PubMed
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Heart rate increase and maximal heart rate during exercise as predictors of cardiovascular mortality: a 16-year follow-up study of 1960 healthy men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50144
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 1995 Aug;6(8):667-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
L. Sandvik
J. Erikssen
M. Ellestad
G. Erikssen
E. Thaulow
R. Mundal
K. Rodahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Central Hospital of Akershus, Nordbyhagen, Norway.
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 1995 Aug;6(8):667-79
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Resting heart rate is directly associated and maximal exercise-induced heart rate inversely associated with cardiovascular mortality, and therefore their difference might contain prognostic information from both variables. The comparative long-term prognostic values of maximal exercise-induced heart rate and of the difference between it and resting heart rate were studied in apparently healthy middle-aged men. METHODS: Resting heart rate and maximal exercise-induced heart rate were measured, and their difference calculated, in 1960 apparently healthy men aged 40-59 years, and mortality was recorded over a period of 16 years. Conventional coronary risk factors were assessed at baseline. RESULTS: Both the difference between the two heart rates and the maximal exercise-induced heart rate were strongly, independently and inversely associated with cardiovascular mortality after adjustment for age, smoking, systolic blood pressure, lung function, glucose tolerance, serum cholesterol level, serum triglycerides level, physical fitness and exercise ECG findings. The adjusted relative risk of cardiovascular death in heart-rate difference quartiles 3 and 4 compared with that in quartile 1 (the lowest heart-rate difference quartile) was 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.33-0.86; P = 0.009). The corresponding value for maximal exercise-induced heart rate was 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.89; P = 0.018). Within the lowest heart-rate difference quartile, but not within the lowest maximal exercise-induced heart rate quartile, a further, strong, negative gradient in cardiovascular mortality was observed. In the high working capacity range, low heart-rate difference but not low maximal exercise-induced heart rate predicted very high cardiovascular disease mortality. Heart-rate difference and maximal exercise-induced heart rate were also inversely associated with non-cardiovascular disease mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Both heart-rate difference and maximal exercise-induced heart rate were strong, graded, long-term predictors of cardiovascular mortality among apparently healthy middle-aged men, independent of age, physical fitness and conventional coronary risk factors. However, low heart-rate difference was a better predictor than low maximal exercise-induced heart rate for recognizing individuals who were at particularly high risk of dying prematurely from cardiovascular diseases.
PubMed ID
8574463 View in PubMed
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Latent ischemic heart disease in sea captains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50415
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Sep;8(3):178-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
R. Mundal
J. Erikssen
K. Rodahl
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Sep;8(3):178-84
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Climate
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking
Stress - complications
Abstract
For 110 apparently healthy Norwegian captains on ocean-going ships a near maximal bicycle exercise test revealed a pathological exercise electrocardiogram for 10.0%, while the corresponding results for a comparable group of Oslo men and a group of Norwegian sea pilots were 4.6 and 11.8%, respectively. The significant difference in prevalence between the captains and Oslo men could not be explained by differences in serum lipids, blood pressure, or a family history of coronary heart disease. The captains were taller and more physically fit than the Oslo men, but they were significantly heavier and had a more rapid age decline in physical performance capacity and a higher prevalence of heavy smokers. Ten of the 11 captains with a pathological exercise electrocardiogram were, or had been, heavy smokers (greater than or equal to 20 cigarettes/d). A high caloric intake in relation to caloric expenditure, heavy smoking, and poorly defined factors such as stress, irregular workhours, and varying climatic conditions are factors to be considered as explanations for these findings. The claim by captains that they have a higher risk than average for developing coronary heart disease was to some extent corroborated in the present study.
PubMed ID
7156937 View in PubMed
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[Occupational physiological examination of fishermen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50475
Source
Nord Med. 1973 Apr;88(4):113
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1973

Physical fitness as a predictor of mortality among healthy, middle-aged Norwegian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50217
Source
N Engl J Med. 1993 Feb 25;328(8):533-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-1993
Author
L. Sandvik
J. Erikssen
E. Thaulow
G. Erikssen
R. Mundal
K. Rodahl
Author Affiliation
Medical Department, Central Hospital of Akershus, Nordbyhagen, Norway.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1993 Feb 25;328(8):533-7
Date
Feb-25-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Coronary Disease - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Physical Fitness
Prognosis
Risk factors
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Despite many studies suggesting that poor physical fitness is an independent risk factor for death from cardiovascular causes, the matter has remained controversial. We studied this question in a 16-year follow-up investigation of Norwegian men that began in 1972. METHODS. Our study included 1960 healthy men 40 to 59 years of age (84 percent of those invited to participate). Conventional coronary risk factors and physical fitness were assessed at base line, with physical fitness measured as the total work performed on a bicycle ergometer during a symptom-limited exercise-tolerance test. RESULTS. After an average follow-up time of 16 years, 271 men had died, 53 percent of them from cardiovascular disease. The relative risk of death from any cause in fitness quartile 4 (highest) as compared with quartile 1 (lowest) was 0.54 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.89; P = 0.015) after adjustment for age, smoking status, serum lipids, blood pressure, resting heart rate, vital capacity, body-mass index, level of physical activity, and glucose tolerance. Total mortality was similar among the subjects in fitness quartiles 1, 2, and 3 when the data were adjusted for these same variables. The adjusted relative risk of death from cardiovascular causes in fitness quartile 4 as compared with quartile 1 was 0.41 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.20 to 0.84; P = 0.013). The corresponding relative risks for quartiles 3 and 2 (as compared with quartile 1) were 0.45 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.22 to 0.92; P = 0.026) and 0.59 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.28 to 1.22; P = 0.15), respectively. CONCLUSIONS. Physical fitness appears to be a graded, independent, long-term predictor of mortality from cardiovascular causes in healthy, middle-aged men. A high level of fitness was also associated with lower mortality from any cause.
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1993 Feb 25;328(8):574-68426626
PubMed ID
8426620 View in PubMed
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[Stress among air traffic controllers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207028
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 20;117(22):3234-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1997
Author
K. Rodahl
R. Mundal
R A Bjørklund
Author Affiliation
Forsvarets sanitet, Oslo mil/Huseby, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 20;117(22):3234-7
Date
Sep-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Blood Pressure Determination
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Psychomotor Performance
Stress, Physiological
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Workload
Abstract
Work stress was assessed by continuous logging of heart rate in 31 air traffic control personnel at seven airports in Norway. The results showed work stress within reasonable limits in all categories of air traffic controllers. Tests of psychomotoric functions in 36 operators revealed that all categories of operative personnel, but the air traffic controllers especially, emphasized accuracy at the expense of speed. Measurements of blood pressure in nine of the 33 air traffic controllers who had shown significantly elevated blood pressure in 1981 during a serious labour conflict revealed values below what was to be expected for their age group.
PubMed ID
9411865 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.