Skip header and navigation

Refine By

95 records – page 1 of 10.

A 6-year nationwide cohort study of glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes. Risk markers for the development of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32420
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Olsen
A. Sjølie
P. Hougaard
J. Johannesen
K. Borch-Johnsen
K. Marinelli
B. Thorsteinsson
S. Pramming
H B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Neuropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Neurologic Examination
Perception
Probability
Risk factors
Vibration
Abstract
The study aimed to identify risk markers (present at the start of the study in 1989) for the occurrence and progression of microvascular complications 6 years later (in 1995) in a Danish nationwide cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (average age at entry 13.7 years). Probabilities for the development of elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), retinopathy, and increased vibration perception threshold (VPT) could then be estimated from a stepwise logistic regression model. A total of 339 patients (47% of the original cohort) were studied. Sex, age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen and dose, height, weight, HbA(1c), blood pressure, and AER were recorded. In addition, information on retinopathy, neuropathy (VPT), and anti-hypertensive treatment was obtained at the end of the study. HbA(1c) (normal range 4.3-5.8, mean 5.3%) and AER (upper normal limit or =20 microg min(-1)) was found in 12.8% of the patients in 1995, and risk markers for this were increased AER and high HbA(1c), in 1989 (both p6.5 V) was found in 62.5% of patients in 1995, for which the risk markers were male sex (p
PubMed ID
11120452 View in PubMed
Less detail

The -238 and -308 G-->A polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor alpha gene promoter are not associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or altered birth weight in Danish Caucasians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47878
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S K Rasmussen
S A Urhammer
J N Jensen
T. Hansen
K. Borch-Johnsen
O. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center and Hagedorn Research Institute, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - genetics
Body constitution
Body mass index
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - genetics
Abstract
Recently, two G-->A polymorphisms at positions -308 and -238, in the promoter of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene, have been identified. These variants have, in different ethnic groups, been linked to estimates of insulin resistance and obesity. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether these genetic variants of TNF-alpha were associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or alterations in birth weight in two Danish study populations comprising 380 unrelated young healthy subjects and 249 glucose-tolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients, respectively. All study participants underwent an iv glucose tolerance test with the addition of tolbutamide after 20 min. In addition, a number of biochemical and anthropometric measures were performed on each subject. The subjects were genotyped for the polymorphisms by applying PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. Neither of the variants was related to altered insulin sensitivity index or other features of the insulin resistance syndrome (body mass index, waist to hip ratio, fat mass, fasting serum lipids or fasting serum insulin or C-peptide). Birth weight and the ponderal index were also not associated with the polymorphisms. In conclusion, although the study was carried out on sufficiently large study samples, the study does not support a major role of the -308 or -238 substitutions of the TNF-alpha gene in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or altered birth weight among Danish Caucasian subjects.
PubMed ID
10770222 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ADDITION study: proposed trial of the cost-effectiveness of an intensive multifactorial intervention on morbidity and mortality among people with Type 2 diabetes detected by screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47804
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
T. Lauritzen
S. Griffin
K. Borch-Johnsen
N J Wareham
B H Wolffenbuttel
G. Rutten
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - therapy
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - economics - therapy
Intervention Studies
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Netherlands - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - economics
Randomized Controlled Trials - methods
Risk factors
Vascular Diseases - etiology - mortality - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The overall aims of the ADDITION study are to evaluate whether screening for prevalent undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes is feasible, and whether subsequent optimised intensive treatment of diabetes, and associated risk factors, is feasible and beneficial. DESIGN: Population-based screening in three European countries followed by an open, randomised controlled trial. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: People aged 40-69 y in the community, without known diabetes, will be offered a random capillary blood glucose screening test by their primary care physicians, followed, if equal to or greater than 5.5 mmol/l, by fasting and 2-h post-glucose-challenge blood glucose measurements. Three thousand newly diagnosed patients will subsequently receive conventional treatment (according to current national guidelines) or intensive multifactorial treatment (lifestyle advice, prescription of aspirin and ACE-inhibitors, in addition to protocol-driven tight control of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol). Patients allocated to intensive treatment will be further randomised to centre-specific interventions to motivate adherence to lifestyle changes and medication. Duration of follow-up is planned for 5 y. Endpoints will include mortality, macrovascular and microvascular complications, patient health status and satisfaction, process-of-care indicators and costs.
PubMed ID
11063279 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Albuminuria and glycemic control. The significance for mortality in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48245
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 25;158(48):6907-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-25-1996
Author
M A Gall
K. Borch-Johnsen
P. Hougaard
F S Nielsen
H H Parving
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 25;158(48):6907-11
Date
Nov-25-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - diagnosis
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - mortality - urine
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The impact of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria on mortality was evaluated prospectively in 328 Caucasian patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) followed for five years. One hundred and ninety-one patients with normoalbuminuria (albumin excretion rate (AER) or = 300 mg/24 h) all less than 66 years old at start of the study were followed from 1987 until death or until 1 January 1993. Eight percent of patients with normoalbuminuria, 20% of patients with microalbuminuria, and 35% of patients with macroalbuminuria had died, predominantly from cardiovascular disease. Significant predictors of all-cause mortality included preexisting coronary heart disease, AER, HbA1c level and age. Significant predictors of cardiovascular mortality included preexisting coronary heart disease, macroalbuminuria, HbA1c level and systolic blood pressure. Abnormally elevated urinary albumin excretion and poor glycaemic control indicate a substantially increased all-cause, mainly cardiovascular, mortality risk in NIDDM patients.
PubMed ID
8984753 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of coronary risk in general practice in relation to the use of guidelines: a survey in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53859
Source
Prev Med. 2001 Oct;33(4):300-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
T F Thomsen
T. Jørgensen
H. Ibsen
K. Borch-Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Preventive Medicine, Medical Department M, University Hospital, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. trth@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Prev Med. 2001 Oct;33(4):300-4
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Denmark
Family Practice - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is a considerable gap between recommended and actually conducted preventive cardiology in general practice. The effect of guidelines is not fully evaluated. METHODS: A questionnaire containing 10 questions on preventive cardiology, including the use of clinical guidelines, together with four case stories for cardiovascular risk estimation was mailed to 205 general practitioners (GPs). RESULTS: Response rate was 81%. Twenty-five percent of the GPs had consultations in preventive cardiology at least once a day and 60% of the GPs thought lifestyle intervention had significant effect on cardiovascular risk. Approximately two-thirds of the GPs were regular users of national guidelines on prevention of cardiovascular disease. While the majority of GPs correctly assigned a patient with multiple risk factors to the high-risk category there was a much larger variation in risk estimations if fewer risk factors were present. GPs who reported use of guidelines overestimated coronary risk twice as frequently as nonusers of guidelines. CONCLUSION: Preventive cardiology in general practice is common and the effect of lifestyle intervention is well accepted. Poor discrimination between high- and low-risk patients may, however, lead to suboptimal preventive care. The use of guidelines does not seem to improve risk estimation and further dissemination of better tools for risk estimation is needed.
PubMed ID
11570834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atherosclerotic risk factors are increased in clinically healthy subjects with microalbuminuria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215984
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1995 Jan 20;112(2):245-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1995
Author
J S Jensen
K. Borch-Johnsen
G. Jensen
B. Feldt-Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1995 Jan 20;112(2):245-52
Date
Jan-20-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Albuminuria - blood - physiopathology
Arteriosclerosis - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Increased morbidity and mortality from atherosclerotic vascular disease were observed in subjects with slightly elevated urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER), known as microalbuminuria. Therefore, the association between microalbuminuria and established atherogenic risk factors was studied in clinically healthy subjects. All healthy 40-65 year-old participants with microalbuminuria, examined within the first 21 months of The Copenhagen City Heart Study, were invited, and 28 were studied. An age- and sex-matched group of 60 randomly chosen subjects with normoalbuminuria served as control. Microalbuminuria was defined as a UAER of 6.6-150 micrograms/min, and normoalbuminuria as a UAER
PubMed ID
7772083 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can a screening programme for diabetes be applied to another population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46995
Source
Diabet Med. 2005 Sep;22(9):1234-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Glümer
K. Borch-Johnsen
S. Colagiuri
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center. Gentofte, Denmark. ChGl@Steno.dk
Source
Diabet Med. 2005 Sep;22(9):1234-8
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Australia - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
Clinical Protocols
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
AIMS: To compare the performance of a Danish diabetes screening protocol in populations from Denmark and Australia. METHODS: The populations used were the Inter99 population from Denmark and the AusDiab population from Australia. The Inter99 study included 6270 individuals aged 30-60 years, randomly selected from Copenhagen County. The AusDiab study included 7079 individuals also aged 30-60 years, randomly selected from throughout Australia. In both studies, all individuals without known diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Screening using a Danish risk score as an initial step was followed by measurement of fasting plasma glucose (FPG). RESULTS: The characteristics of the study populations showed some differences in risk profile, with more individuals in the AusDiab study being obese, whilst in the Danish cohort, mean blood pressure was higher, less people took anti-hypertensive medication and there was a higher prevalence of screen-detected diabetes. Comparing the Australian and Danish populations, overall performance of the screening protocol was similar-area under area receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve 0.75 vs. 0.77, sensitivity 71 vs. 76% and positive predictive value (PPV) 6 vs. 9%. Small but statistically significant differences were observed in specificity (70 vs. 66%; P or = 6.1 mmol/l showed a similar pattern. Again, specificity was slightly but significantly higher in the Australian population (95 vs. 93%; P
PubMed ID
16108854 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence in a population-based cohort of patients hospitalized with diabetes mellitus in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21942
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Sep 17;89(18):1360-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1997
Author
L. Wideroff
G. Gridley
L. Mellemkjaer
W H Chow
M. Linet
S. Keehn
K. Borch-Johnsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-7374, USA.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Sep 17;89(18):1360-5
Date
Sep-17-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Sex Distribution
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Diabetes has been associated with an increased risk of several cancers, notably cancers of the pancreas, liver, endometrium, and kidney. Since most previous studies have involved a limited sample size or focused on specific cancer sites, we conducted a comprehensive assessment of the risk of cancer in a nationwide cohort of diabetics in Denmark. METHODS: Discharge records of 109581 individuals hospitalized with a diagnosis of diabetes from 1977 through 1989 were linked with national cancer registry records through 1993. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for specific cancer sites. RESULTS: The SIRs for primary liver cancer were 4.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.5-4.6) in males and 2.1 (95% CI = 1.6-2.7) in females. These SIRs remained elevated with increasing years of follow-up and after exclusion of patients with reported risk factors (e.g., cirrhosis and hepatitis) or patients whose cancers were diagnosed at autopsy. Kidney cancer risk was also elevated, with SIRs of 1.4 (95% CI = 1.2-1.6) in males and 1.7 (95% CI = 1.4-1.9) in females. For both sexes combined, the SIR for pancreatic cancer was 2.1 (95% CI = 1.9-2.4), with a follow-up time of 1-4 years; this SIR declined to 1.3 (95% CI = 1.1-1.6) after 5-9 years of follow-up. Excess risks were also observed for biliary tract and endometrial cancers. The SIRs for kidney and endometrial cancers declined somewhat after exclusion of diabetics with reported obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of diabetes appear to be at higher risk of developing cancers of the liver, biliary tract, pancreas, endometrium, and kidney. The elevated risks of endometrial and kidney cancers, however, may be confounded by obesity.
PubMed ID
9308706 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular risk factor profile in subjects with familial predisposition to myocardial infarction in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50074
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Jun;51(3):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
M. Hippe
J. Vestbo
A M Bjerg
K. Borch-Johnsen
M. Appleyard
H O Hein
P K Andersen
G. Jensen
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Jun;51(3):266-71
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - genetics - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Parents
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Triglycerides - analysis
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To identify possible modifiable mediators of familial predisposition to myocardial infarction (MI) by assessing the risk factor profile in individuals without MI in relation to parental occurrence of MI. DESIGN AND METHODS: Cross sectional survey of the general population. The odds of an adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile in subjects reporting parental occurrence of MI versus subjects not reporting parental occurrence were estimated by logistic regression models. SETTING: The Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, where subjects investigated in three Danish prospective population studies are integrated. PARTICIPANTS: Subjects were 9306 females and 11,091 males aged 20-75 years with no history of MI. A total of 1370 subjects reported maternal MI and 2583 reported paternal MI. MAIN RESULTS: Increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, increased cholesterol level, low ratio between high density lipoprotein (HDL) and total cholesterol (TC), and heavy smoking, were more frequent in subjects with parental occurrence of MI than in controls irrespective of sex and age of the subjects. Maternal MI was more predictive for increased cholesterol and decreased HDL/ TC ratio than paternal MI, and the risk of an increased cholesterol level was higher in subjects aged 20-39 years than in older subjects. No differences in body mass index, triglycerides, and physical inactivity were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects free of previous MI who reported a parental occurrence of MI had an adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile regarding systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, the ratio between HDL and total cholesterol, and smoking. Thus, these modifiable risk factors may be mediators of the familial predisposition to MI.
PubMed ID
9229055 View in PubMed
Less detail

Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor predicts cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and mortality in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96636
Source
J Intern Med. 2010 May 28;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2010
Author
J. Eugen-Olsen
O. Andersen
A. Linneberg
S. Ladelund
T W Hansen
A. Langkilde
J. Petersen
T. Pielak
L N Møller
J. Jeppesen
S. Lyngbæk
M. Fenger
M H Olsen
P R Hildebrandt
K. Borch-Johnsen
T. Jørgensen
S B Haugaard
Author Affiliation
From the Clinical Research Centre, Copenhagen University, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 2010 May 28;
Date
May-28-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract. Eugen-Olsen J, Andersen O, Linneberg A, Ladelund S, Hansen TW, Langkilde A, Petersen J, Pielak T, Møller LN, Jeppesen J, Lyngbaek S, Fenger M, Olsen MH, Hildebrandt PR, Borch-Johnsen K, Jørgensen T, Haugaard SB (Copenhagen University, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre; Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup; Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen; Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup; Copenhagen University, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre; Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte; University of Aarhus, Aarhus; University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen; Copenhagen University, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark). Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor predicts cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and mortality in the general population. J Intern Med 2010; doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2010.02252.x. Background. Low-grade inflammation is thought to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), cancer and mortality. Biomarkers of inflammation may aid in risk prediction and enable early intervention and prevention of disease. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate whether plasma levels of the inflammatory biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) are predictive of disease and mortality in the general population. Design. This was an observational prospective cohort study. Cohort participants were included from June 1993 to December 1994 and followed until the end of 2006. Setting. General adult Caucasian population. Participants. The MONICA10 study, a population-based cohort recruited from Copenhagen, Denmark, included 2602 individuals aged 41, 51, 61 or 71 years. Measurements. Blood samples were analysed for suPAR levels using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Risk of cancer (n = 308), CVD (n = 301), T2D (n = 59) and mortality (n = 411) was assessed with a multivariate proportional hazards model using Cox regression. Results. Elevated baseline suPAR level was associated with an increased risk of cancer, CVD, T2D and mortality during follow-up. suPAR was more strongly associated with cancer, CVD and mortality in men than in women, and in younger compared with older individuals. suPAR remained significantly associated with the risk of negative outcome after adjustment for a number of relevant risk factors including C-reactive protein levels. Limitation. Further validation in ethnic populations other than Caucasians is needed. Conclusion. The stable plasma protein suPAR may be a promising biomarker because of its independent association with incident cancer, CVD, T2D and mortality in the general population.
PubMed ID
20561148 View in PubMed
Less detail

95 records – page 1 of 10.