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Aging alters the contribution of nitric oxide to regional muscle hemodynamic control at rest and during exercise in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101474
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2011 Jul 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-2011
Author
Daniel M Hirai
Steven W Copp
K Sue Hageman
David C Poole
Timothy I Musch
Author Affiliation
1Kansas State University.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2011 Jul 14;
Date
Jul-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Advanced age is associated with altered skeletal muscle hemodynamic control during the transition from rest to exercise. This study investigated the effects of aging on the functional role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating total, inter- and intra-muscular hindlimb hemodynamic control at rest and during submaximal whole-body exercise. We hypothesized that NO synthase inhibition (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester, L-NAME; 10 mg/kg) would result in attenuated reductions in vascular conductance (VC) primarily in oxidative muscles in old compared to young rats. Total and regional hindlimb muscle VC were determined via radiolabelled microspheres at rest and during treadmill running (20 m/min, 5% grade) in nine young (6-8 mo) and seven old (27-29 mo) male Fisher 344xBrown Norway rats. At rest, L-NAME increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) significantly by ~17% and 21% in young and old rats, respectively. During exercise, L-NAME increased MAP significantly by ~13% and 19% in young and old rats, respectively. Compared to young, L-NAME administration in old rats evoked attenuated reductions in total hindlimb VC during exercise (i.e., down by ~23% in old vs. 43% in young rats; P
PubMed ID
21757576 View in PubMed
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Altered regional blood flow responses to submaximal exercise in older rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49729
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2004 Jan;96(1):81-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Timothy I Musch
Kevin E Eklund
K Sue Hageman
David C Poole
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5602, USA. musch@vet.ksu.edu
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2004 Jan;96(1):81-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blood pressure
Exertion - physiology
Heart rate
Hindlimb
Microspheres
Muscle, Skeletal - blood supply - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Regional Blood Flow - physiology
Renal Circulation - physiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Rest - physiology
Abstract
Maximal aerobic capacity and the ability to sustain submaximal exercise (Ex) declines with advancing age. Whether altered muscle blood flow (BF) plays a mechanistic role in these effects remains to be resolved. The present investigation determined the effects of aging on the hemodynamic and regional BF response to submaximal Ex in rats. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and BF to different organs (kidneys, splanchnic organs, and 28 hindlimb muscles) were determined at rest and during submaximal treadmill Ex (20 m/min, 5% grade) with radiolabeled microspheres in young (Y; 6-8 mo old, 339 +/- 8 g, n = 9) and old (O; 27-29 mo old, 504 +/- 18 g, n = 7) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats. Results demonstrated that HR, MAP, and BF to the pancreas, small and large intestine, and total hindlimb musculature were similar between Y and O rats at rest. BF to the kidneys, spleen, and stomach were 33, 60, and 43% lower, respectively, in O compared with Y rats. BF to the total hindlimb musculature increased (P
PubMed ID
12959955 View in PubMed
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Impact of aging on muscle blood flow in chronic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49620
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2005 Aug;99(2):505-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Kevin E Eklund
K Sue Hageman
David C Poole
Timothy I Musch
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 128 Coles Hall, 1600 Denison Avenue, Manhattan, KS 66505-5802, USA.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2005 Aug;99(2):505-14
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Blood Flow Velocity
Chronic Disease
Exercise Test
Exertion
Heart Failure, Congestive - physiopathology
Muscle Fibers
Muscle, Skeletal - blood supply - physiopathology
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Chronic heart failure (CHF) is manifested principally in the elderly population. Therefore, to understand the causes of exercise intolerance in CHF patients, it is imperative to resolve the effects of aging on muscle blood flow (BF) in CHF. To address this issue, we determined the muscle BF response to submaximal treadmill exercise (20 m/min, 5% grade) in young (Y(CHF): 6-8 mo, 412 +/- 11 g, n = 11) and old (O(CHF): 27-29 mo, 494 +/- 10 g, n = 8) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats with similar degrees of myocardial infarction-induced left ventricular (LV) dysfunction [resting LV end-diastolic pressure: Y(CHF) = 24 +/- 2, O(CHF) = 22 +/- 2 mmHg; derivative of LV pressure over time: Y(CHF) = 5,168 +/- 285; O(CHF) = 5,050 +/- 165 mmHg/s; lung weight normalized to body weight: Y(CHF) = 9.14 +/- 0.72; O(CHF) = 8.21 +/- 0.29 mg/g (all P > 0.05)]. The exercising heart rate response was blunted in O(CHF) compared with Y(CHF) rats (Y(CHF) = 454 +/- 8, O(CHF) = 395 +/- 9 beats/min; P
PubMed ID
15802367 View in PubMed
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