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Bronchiectasis in Alaska Native children: causes and clinical courses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3830
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2000 Mar;29(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
R. Singleton
A. Morris
G. Redding
J. Poll
P. Holck
P. Martinez
D. Kruse
L R Bulkow
K M Petersen
C. Lewis
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. ris2@cdc.gov
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2000 Mar;29(3):182-7
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Asthma - complications - physiopathology
Bronchiectasis - etiology - physiopathology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Foreign Bodies - complications
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Lung - physiopathology
Pneumonectomy
Pneumonia - complications - physiopathology
Pneumonia, Aspiration - complications
Pneumonia, Bacterial - complications
Prevalence
Recurrence
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - complications
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
Although bronchiectasis has become a rare condition in U.S. children, it is still commonly diagnosed in Alaska Native children in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta. The prevalence of bronchiectasis has not decreased in persons born during the 1980s as compared with those born in the 1940s. We reviewed case histories of 46 children with bronchiectasis. We observed that recurrent pneumonia was the major preceding medical condition in 85% of patients. There was an association between the lobes affected by pneumonia and the lobes affected by bronchiectasis. Eight (17%) patients had surgical resection of involved lobes. We conclude that the continued high prevalence of bronchiectasis appears to be related to extremely high rates of infant and childhood pneumonia. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2000;29:182-187. Published 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
PubMed ID
10686038 View in PubMed
Less detail

High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in the Alaska native population and association with low serum ferritin levels in young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5553
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2000 Nov;7(6):885-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
A J Parkinson
B D Gold
L. Bulkow
R B Wainwright
B. Swaminathan
B. Khanna
K M Petersen
M A Fitzgerald
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. ajp1@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2000 Nov;7(6):885-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Ferritin - blood
Helicobacter Infections - blood - complications - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Iron deficiency anemia is a common public health problem in the Alaska Native population. Yet, a clear etiology has eluded researchers for decades. Previous studies suggested a link between Helicobacter pylori infection, gastrointestinal blood loss due to hemorrhagic gastritis, and generalized iron deficiency anemia in adult Alaska Natives. Therefore, we examined the association between the prevalence of H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and serum ferritin levels, a marker of iron deficiency. A random sample of 2,080 serum samples from Alaska Native residents drawn between 1980 and 1986 from residents in 13 regions was selected, and the samples were stratified by age, sex, and region. Overall, 75% were positive for H. pylori-specific IgG. The rate of H. pylori seropositivity increased with age; by age 14 years, 78% of the residents were positive. There were no gender differences in H. pylori seropositivity. However, marked regional differences were observed. Serum ferritin levels of
PubMed ID
11063492 View in PubMed
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Hospitalizations for respiratory syncytial virus infection in Alaska Native children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6864
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1995 Jan;14(1):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
R J Singleton
K M Petersen
J E Berner
E. Schulte
K. Chiu
C M Lilly
E A Hughes
L R Bulkow
T L Nix
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1995 Jan;14(1):26-30
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Length of Stay
Male
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human
Seasons
Abstract
To characterize the epidemiology of Alaska Native children hospitalized for respiratory syncytial virus infections, we reviewed records of hospitalizations during the winter seasons of 1991 to 1992 and 1992 to 1993 at a hospital in Anchorage and a rural hospital in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) region of southwestern Alaska. The median age of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus infection was 2 months of age for YKD residents and 4.5 months for Anchorage residents. Sixteen percent of the hospitalized YKD children were less than 1 month of age, whereas the same was true for only 3% of the Anchorage children. Eight percent of the YKD patients required mechanical ventilation, whereas none of the Anchorage patients required ventilation. The median hospital stay was 4.8 days for YKD patients and 3.2 days for Anchorage patients. Hospitalization rates for infants less than 1 year of age were 33/1000 for Alaska Natives in Anchorage and 100/1000 for those in the YKD region. The extremely high hospitalization rate, especially among very young infants in the rural YKD region, points to a need for early preventive efforts.
PubMed ID
7715985 View in PubMed
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Immunogenicity of a heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Apache and Navajo Indian, Alaska Native, and non-Native American children aged <2 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5834
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Jul;31(1):34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
K M Miernyk
A J Parkinson
K M Rudolph
K M Petersen
L R Bulkow
D P Greenberg
J I Ward
G. Brenneman
R. Reid
M. Santosham
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Public Health Service, US Department of Health and Human Services, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. kcm4@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Jul;31(1):34-41
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Comparative Study
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Indians, North American
Infant
Meningococcal Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Neisseria meningitidis - immunology
Pneumococcal Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vaccines, Conjugate - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
High rates of invasive pneumococcal disease have been described among infants living in various Native American communities. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of a 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine consisting of serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F covalently linked to the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis in Apache and Navajo Indian, Alaska Native, and non-Native American children. The vaccine was administered at ages 2, 4, and 6 months; a booster dose was given at age 15 months. Levels of serotype-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) were measured by a standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The responses after 3 primary doses of vaccine were similar in all 3 groups of children, except for those to serotypes 14 and 23F. One month after the booster dose, geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) of serotype-specific IgG antibodies increased significantly in all 3 groups of children, compared with GMCs of IgG antibodies to pneumococcal serotypes before the booster dose.
PubMed ID
10913393 View in PubMed
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Invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in Alaskan residents aged 10 years and older before and after infant vaccination programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5835
Source
JAMA. 2000 Jun 21;283(23):3089-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-2000
Author
D G Perdue
L R Bulkow
B G Gellin
M. Davidson
K M Petersen
R J Singleton
A J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Arctic Investigations Program, 4055 Tudor Centre Dr, Anchorage, AK 99508-5902, USA.
Source
JAMA. 2000 Jun 21;283(23):3089-94
Date
Jun-21-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Female
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Haemophilus influenzae - classification
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Serotyping
Survival Analysis
Abstract
CONTEXT: The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination of children has led to a decline in incidence of Hib disease in young Alaskan children. However, the impact of vaccination on unimmunized Alaskan adolescents and adults has not been studied. OBJECTIVE: To characterize trends in incidence of and mortality due to invasive H influenzae disease in Alaskan residents aged 10 years and older prior to and after the introduction of a statewide Hib infant vaccination program. DESIGN AND SETTING: Population-based, descriptive correlational study conducted 1980-1996 in Alaska. SUBJECTS: One hundred twenty-nine individuals (31 Alaska Natives and 98 nonnative Alaska residents) aged 10 years and older in whom H influenzae was cultured from a normally sterile site. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of H influenzae infection before (1980-1990) vs after (1991-1996) vaccination program initiation; serotype, biotype, and beta-lactamase production of isolates. RESULTS: The overall annual incidence of invasive H influenzae in those aged 10 years and older declined 33%, from 2.1 per 100,000 persons per year to 1.4 per 100,000 persons per year (P=. 03) after initiation of statewide infant Hib vaccination programs in 1991. This reduction appeared to be the result of a decrease in serotype b disease (82%; P
PubMed ID
10865303 View in PubMed
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Iron deficiency anemia among Alaska Natives may be due to fecal loss rather than inadequate intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4875
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Nov;126(11):2774-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
K M Petersen
A J Parkinson
E D Nobmann
L. Bulkow
R. Yip
A. Mokdad
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Anchorage, AK 99501, USA.
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Nov;126(11):2774-83
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Biological Availability
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Feces - chemistry
Female
Ferritin - blood
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Infant
Iron - analysis - metabolism - pharmacokinetics
Iron, Dietary - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To define more fully the nature of a persistently high prevalence of iron deficiency anemia observed among Alaska Native children, we examined dietary iron intake, hemoglobin concentrations, and storage iron (serum ferritin) based on multiple cross-sectional surveys of Alaska Natives between 1983 and 1989. Approximately 30 to 50% of the children studied
PubMed ID
8914948 View in PubMed
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Nutritional rickets among breast-fed black and Alaska Native children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4865
Source
Alaska Med. 1997 Jul-Sep;39(3):72-4, 87
Publication Type
Article
Author
B D Gessner
E. deSchweinitz
K M Petersen
C. Lewandowski
Author Affiliation
Anchorage Neighborhood Health Center, AK, USA. gess100w@wonder.em.cdc.gov
Source
Alaska Med. 1997 Jul-Sep;39(3):72-4, 87
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans
Alaska
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Male
Nutritional Status
Rickets - drug therapy - ethnology - physiopathology
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Although nutritional rickets remains a problem primarily in developing countries, children in northern climates in developed countries may also be at risk. We reviewed the case histories of five children diagnosed in Alaska during 1993-96. Three of the children were black and two Alaska Native. Their ages ranged from 11 to 20 months and they presented during January, April, and September. All of the children were breast-fed but only two received their milk intake exclusively from breast milk. The presenting complaint included abnormal gait in two children and seizures, bowed legs, and growth delay in one child each. All five children demonstrated a decrease in their height-for-age percentile. The most common physical finding was a rachitic rosary which was present in four children. In Alaska, all black and Alaska Native children (and other more pigmented children) less than two years of age who receive all or part of their milk intake from breast milk should receive vitamin D supplementation regardless of the time of year.
Notes
Comment In: Alaska Med. 1997 Oct-Dec;39(4):119-209473810
PubMed ID
9368423 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pervasive occult gastrointestinal bleeding in an Alaska native population with prevalent iron deficiency. Role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4873
Source
JAMA. 1997 Apr 9;277(14):1135-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-9-1997
Author
R. Yip
P J Limburg
D A Ahlquist
H A Carpenter
A. O'Neill
D. Kruse
S. Stitham
B D Gold
E W Gunter
A C Looker
A J Parkinson
E D Nobmann
K M Petersen
M. Ellefson
S. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga, USA.
Source
JAMA. 1997 Apr 9;277(14):1135-9
Date
Apr-9-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Endoscopy, Digestive System
Feces
Female
Gastritis - complications - ethnology - microbiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - complications - ethnology - etiology
Helicobacter Infections - complications - ethnology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Inuits
Iron - deficiency
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To confirm prevalent iron deficiency among Yupik Eskimos living in Alaska and to explore the frequency of and potential lesions accounting for occult gastrointestinal bleeding. DESIGN: Descriptive survey. SETTING: Rural Arctic community. SUBJECTS: A total of 140 adult volunteers from 3 villages in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region of western Alaska. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Daily iron intake, hematologic and biochemical indexes of iron status, fecal hemoglobin levels, stool parasites, and endoscopic findings. RESULTS: While dietary iron intake by Yupiks was similar to that of a reference population, iron deficiency prevalence was increased 13-fold in Yupik men and 4-fold in Yupik women. Fecal hemoglobin levels were elevated in 90% of subjects contrasted with only 4% of a reference group; median levels were 5.9 and 0.5 mg of hemoglobin per gram of stool, respectively. Among 70 Yupik subjects with elevated fecal hemoglobin levels who had endoscopy performed, 68 (97%) had an abnormal gastric appearance consisting of erythema, mucosal thickening, diffuse mucosal hemorrhages, erosions, or ulcerations. Gastric biopsies revealed chronic active gastritis with associated Helicobacter pylori in 68 (99%) of 69. No other hemorrhagic gastrointestinal disease was detected. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this study sample, occult gastrointestinal bleeding appears to be pervasive in the Yupik population and likely underlies the prevalent iron deficiency. An atypical hemorrhagic gastritis associated with H pylori infection is present almost universally and may represent the bleeding source.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1997 Apr 9;277(14):1166-79087475
PubMed ID
9087468 View in PubMed
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Severe respiratory syncytial virus disease in Alaska native children. RSV Alaska Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6787
Source
J Infect Dis. 1999 Jul;180(1):41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
R A Karron
R J Singleton
L. Bulkow
A. Parkinson
D. Kruse
I. DeSmet
C. Indorf
K M Petersen
D. Leombruno
D. Hurlburt
M. Santosham
L H Harrison
Author Affiliation
Center for Immunization Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. rkarron@jhsph.edu
Source
J Infect Dis. 1999 Jul;180(1):41-9
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Baltimore - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Fetal Blood - immunology
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - economics - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses - classification
Risk factors
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Hospitalization rates for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection range from 1 to 20/1000 infants. To determine the rate and severity of RSV infections requiring hospitalization for infants in the Yukon-Kuskokwim (YK) Delta of Alaska, a 3-year prospective surveillance study was conducted. The annual rate of RSV hospitalization for YK Delta infants
PubMed ID
10353859 View in PubMed
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Tobacco erases 30 years of progress: preliminary analysis of the effect of tobacco smoking on Alaska Native birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3533
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Jan-Mar;38(1):31-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
N J Murphy
S W Butler
K M Petersen
V. Heart
C M Murphy
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Jan-Mar;38(1):31-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Birth Certificates
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Pregnancy
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Investigate the relationship between tobacco and/or alcohol use and Alaska Native birth weight. METHODS: Data on weight, tobacco smoking and alcohol use among Alaska Natives were abstracted from 1989-91 Indian Health Service natality records based on birth certificates. RESULTS: Birth certificate data were available for 9,175 live births. Single live births were analyzed for 8,994 Alaska Natives. In women with no tobacco smoking the mean birth weight of their infants was 3,571 g; 1-5 cigarettes/day 3,429 g; 6-10 cigarettes/day 3,332 g (p 10 cigarettes/day 3,260 g (p
PubMed ID
8936100 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.