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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Aerobic work capacity in young Norwegian men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74866
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1965 May;20(3):425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1965

Blood pressure in adult Lapps and Skolts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252511
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1975 Feb;7(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
S. Sundberg
P. Luukka
K L Andersen
A W Eriksson
P. Siltanen
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1975 Feb;7(1):17-22
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Blood pressure
Climate
Continental Population Groups
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
Casual blood pressures were recorded in 331 Lapps and 221 Skolts over the age of 20. The systolic pressure was found to rise more with age in women than in men. In neither sex did age affect the diastolic pressure. A general tendency towards higher blood pressure in Lapps than in Skolts was noted up to the age of 50-60 years. Comparison with a Finnish population and one from the Aland Islands revealed similar systolic blood pressures in females, but definitely lower values in male Lapps and Skolts. The Lapps and Skolts did not have the clear age dependence of the diastolic blood pressure as occurs in Finns. These findings, together with other population studies, support the hypothesis that the setting of the resting blood pressure level is influenced by different kinds of stress associated with technological development and with an urbanized way of life.
PubMed ID
1155907 View in PubMed
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Circulatory and respiratory responses to muscular exercise in Czech and Norwegian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39695
Source
Physiol Bohemoslov. 1985;34(4):303-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
K L Andersen
M. Mácek
J. Rutenfranz
J. Vávra
J. Mácková
J. Radvanský
F. Klimmer
H. Kylian
K. Danek
W. Ottmann
Source
Physiol Bohemoslov. 1985;34(4):303-12
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiovascular physiology
Child
Comparative Study
Czechoslovakia
Exertion
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Norway
Oxygen consumption
Respiratory physiology
Vital Capacity
Abstract
This paper presents a comparison between Czech and Norwegian rural healthy children with regard to the functional characteristics of the circulatory and respiratory system based upon work physiological variables and measurements of some pulmonary volumes. The study included randomised samples of boys and girls at the age of 8, 12 and 16 years, 66 Czech boys and 63 girls, 54 Norwegian boys and 57 girls. At the age of 8 years the maximal aerobic power was closely similar in both countries, but in the older age groups the Norwegian children exhibited lower physical fitness. The maximal heart rate was close to 200 min-1 on the average without any sex, age or ethnic differences. In agreement with the higher maximal aerobic power the 12 and 16 year old Czech children had lower submaximal heart rates for the same oxygen uptake than the Norwegian children. The forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second was significantly higher on the average in Czech than in Norwegian children but the latter, expressed in percent age of the former, averaged 87 to 91% without any sex, age or ethnic differences. The maximal ventilation volumes during muscular exercise reached higher values in Czech than in Norwegian children of the same age, but the mean maximal respiratory rate was close to 60 min-1, being independent of age, sex and cultural differences. During heavy exercise only 40 to 50% of the vital capacity and 45 to 55% of the forced expiratory volume were taken into account and this index of pulmonary function did not differ with sex, age or ethnic differences.
PubMed ID
2932750 View in PubMed
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The effect of a high level of habitual physical activity in the regulation of fatness during aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251754
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1975 Nov 4;36(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1975

Ethnic group differences in fitness for sustained and strenuous muscular exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44771
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Mar 25;96(12):832-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-1967

Excercise ventilation during the growth spurt period: comparison between two European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40739
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1981 May;136(2):135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
J. Rutenfranz
K L Andersen
V. Seliger
F. Klimmer
J. Ilmarinen
M. Ruppel
H. Kylian
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1981 May;136(2):135-42
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Comparative Study
Exertion
Female
Germany, West
Growth
Humans
Male
Norway
Puberty
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
The paper provides reference values with regard to pulmonary ventilation responses o progressively increasing bicycling up to the maximal level during the period of growth spurt. Data are based on longitudinal studies or rural Norwegian and German school children. A cluster sampling technique was used, starting with the total pupil-population at Lom in Norway at an age of 8 years, and annual tests were performed until the age of 15 years. In germany a similar pupil-population was tested from age 12 until age 17 years. Functional growth curves giving means and dispersions for ventilation rates, tidal volume, respiratory frequency, ventilatory equivalent and respiratory gas exchange ratio are constructed. Norwegian and German children's developmental processes with regard to the exercise ventilation variables were compared, and revealed no significant differences.
PubMed ID
7227389 View in PubMed
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Health standards in terms of exercise fitness of school children in urban and rural areas in various European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40542
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1982;14 Suppl 34:33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
J. Rutenfranz
K L Andersen
V. Seliger
R. Masironi
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1982;14 Suppl 34:33-6
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Child
Comparative Study
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolism
Physical Fitness
Rural Population
Students
Urban Population
Abstract
Health standard in terms of maximal aerobic power has been assessed in representative samples of school children in four European countries, with the object of testing the hypothesis that factors associated with the present days urbanization hamper the developmental process. In Norway and Iceland the exercise fitness of urban living children was stronger than that of children living in scarcely populated areas. In West Germany and Czechoslovakia there appeared a tendency in the same direction though the health standard in some ages was similar for urban and rural living children. The conclusion is consequently clear in as much as no evidence was found that supports the widespread concept that urbanization affects the exercise fitness during growth. On the contrary, urban living seems to enhance the developmental process most likely because the urbanized society stimulates children to vigorous play and sport, thus increasing habitual physical activity. Children living in rural environment become socially isolated, adopt sedentary living habits which subsequently hamper the development of functional characteristics. The maximal aerobic power of the boys and girls in these four European countries was similar when compared on basis on where they are living (urban/rural) except for the Norwegian boys who were considerably superior to the others.
PubMed ID
7149629 View in PubMed
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Maximum aerobic power and body composition during the puberty growth period: similarities and differences between children of two European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40740
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1981 May;136(2):123-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
J. Rutenfranz
K L Andersen
V. Seliger
F. Klimmer
I. Berndt
M. Ruppel
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1981 May;136(2):123-33
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body Composition
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Germany, West
Growth
Humans
Male
Norway
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Puberty
Sex Factors
Abstract
This report gives results of a longitudinal study of two cohorts of school children in Norway and West-Germany. The rate of growth in body size and composition is identical for the two samples, but different for the two sexes, and follows closely the trend of growth which has been found for North-Europeans in general. Despite of this similarity in growth of anatomical variables the Norwegian children appeared to be superior in their maximum aerobic power at all comparable ages and in both sexes. The differences between means in maximal oxygen uptake varies somewhat with age and sex and are in the range of 5-10%. It is suggested that the mean differences between Norwegian and German children in their exercise and cardio-vascular fitness are brought about by a more physically active behavioural pattern of living in Norway.
PubMed ID
7227388 View in PubMed
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Physical performance capacity of children in Norway. III. Respiratory responses to graded exercise loadings--population parameters in a rural community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43164
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1974;33(4):265-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

17 records – page 1 of 2.