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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Accuracy of CT scan measurements of the medial temporal lobe in routine dementia diagnostics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52157
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;18(4):308-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
A R Oksengaard
M. Haakonsen
R. Dullerud
K. Engedal
K. Laake
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. a.r.h.oksengard@ioks.uio.no
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;18(4):308-12
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - pathology - radiography
England
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Temporal Lobe - pathology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Atrophy of the medial part of the temporal lobe is seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the usefulness of CT scan measurements of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in elderly with suspected dementia. METHODS: MTL measurements were done with callipers by three raters, blinded to the diagnosis and to each other, on scans from 110 subjects with suspected dementia from a memory clinic in Oslo, Norway and 36 participants included in the OPTIMA study, Oxford, England. RESULTS: The correlation between the MTL and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was very low, and there was a marked overlap between Alzheimer and cognitively unimpaired subjects. The inter-rater reliability was lower on the Norwegian than on the OPTIMA scans (R = 0.48 vs R = 0.68), but this was partly explained by larger MTL readings (4.5 mm after adjustment for age, gender and MMSE sumscore) on the OPTIMA scans as the reliability was confounded by MTL width and was higher at larger MTLs. A wider scan width (3 mm vs 2 mm in the OPTIMA scans) can also contribute to differences in reliability. CONCLUSIONS: The published threshold values regarding the CT scan MTL measurements for the diagnosis of AD may be invalid when applied by other radiology departments without a local standardisation and validation.
PubMed ID
12673606 View in PubMed
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Change in psychotropic drug use in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297761
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
G Selbæk
S I M Janus
S Bergh
K Engedal
S Ruths
A S Helvik
J Šaltyte Benth
S U Zuidema
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health,Vestfold Hospital Trust,Tønsberg,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Behavioral Symptoms - drug therapy - psychology
Cognition Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground:We aimed to assess whether there were any changes in the use of psychotropic drugs in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011. Also, we investigated whether the predictors of use of specific psychotropic drug groups have changed.
We conducted a secondary analysis of two cohort studies of two Norwegian nursing home samples (2004/05 and 2010/11). Multivariate models were applied.
We found a significant decrease in the prescription of antipsychotic drugs between 2004 and 2011 (0.63 OR, 95%CI = 0.49-0.82, p
PubMed ID
28988552 View in PubMed
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Day care for demented patients in general nursing homes. Effects on admissions to institutions and mental capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230118
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1989 Oct;7(3):161-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
K. Engedal
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, Oslo.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1989 Oct;7(3):161-6
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Day Care - organization & administration
Dementia - therapy
Female
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - utilization
Patient Admission
Abstract
A day centre programme for demented patients aged 75 years and over was evaluated in a controlled trial, emphasizing its effect on the use of institutional care and mental capacity. A cost-benefit analysis of the programme was also performed. Thirty-eight patients were offered day care, thirty-nine served as controls. The programme was cost-effective in the sense that it reduced the frequency of the admissions to the acute units of the City hospitals and the cost of care. However, admission to permanent stay in nursing home was not delayed. The mental capacity deteriorated at the same rate in the two groups.
PubMed ID
2511612 View in PubMed
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[Delirium (acute confusion) among elderly patients after admission to a medical department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217304
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Sep 20;114(22):2613-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1994
Author
A. Braekhus
K. Engedal
Author Affiliation
Geriatrisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Sep 20;114(22):2613-5
Date
Sep-20-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Confusion - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Prevalence
Abstract
Delirium is a common mental disorder among the elderly. In this study we examined the prevalence of delirium among patients older than 75 years of age who had been admitted to an acute medical ward. 14 of 58 patients (24%) received a diagnosis of delirium. For these patients we recorded in all 58 factors possibly associated with its occurrence, four on average per patient. Drugs, cerebrovascular disease, and congestive heart failure were the most common factors. The large number of possibly contributing factors precludes a definite conclusion regarding precipitating factors. Mini-Mental State Examination, which is a commonly used screening-instrument for detecting cognitive impairment, was of minor value in detecting delirium.
PubMed ID
7985180 View in PubMed
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[Geriatric psychiatry--a specialty gaining recognition]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46375
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3681-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1997
Author
K. Engedal
E. Nordberg
K M Moksnes
H K Henriksen
A L Bergem
Author Affiliation
Psykogeriatrisk seksjon, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3681-3
Date
Oct-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
English Abstract
Geriatric Psychiatry - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Services for the Aged - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Norway
Questionnaires
Abstract
Services for elderly, mentally ill people have developed in response to changing needs in society. In 1990 most of the 650 beds allocated to elderly patients in psychiatric hospitals were occupied by long-term care patients. Outpatient programmes hardly existed. In 1995 about 400 beds were allocated to geriatric psychiatry. They were served by 40 physicians and 20 psychologists. Out-patients' clinics were established. Most of the in-patients were short-term admissions. Nowadays, departments of geriatric psychiatry define themselves as diagnostic and short-term units. About a third of the in-patients suffer from dementia, a third from depression, and a third from various other psychiatric disorders. The authors recommend that a special unit for geriatric psychiatry should be established in every county in Norway. Funds should be allocated for professorships at all universities.
PubMed ID
9417665 View in PubMed
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[Geriatric psychiatry--a specialty within psychiatry]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46374
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3684-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1997
Author
K. Engedal
A L Bergem
M. Holm
A. Bragason
K M Moksnes
Author Affiliation
Psykogeriatrisk seksjon, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3684-7
Date
Oct-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Confusion - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
English Abstract
Geriatric Psychiatry - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Specialties, Medical
Abstract
The aim of this article is to describe the prevalence of mental disorders in the elderly and how the psychiatric services for these patients ought to be organized in Norway. Geriatric psychiatry is a special branch of psychiatry. Its areas of concern are the assessment and treatment of mental disorders which frequently occur in the elderly. The most prevalent psychiatric disorders are depression and dementia. Functional psychosis and anxiety disorders are less prevalent, but nevertheless disorders causing great concern. Psychiatric morbidity frequently coexists with physical illness. An elderly patient suffering from a mental disorder often has a combination of psychological, social and physical needs. The resources allocated to psychiatric services for old people are scarce. Efforts should be made to establish a special unit for geriatric psychiatry in every county in Norway. Each unit should serve approximately 150-200,000 inhabitants, and should consist of both an in-patients' and an out-patients' clinic. It is recommended that there should be 1 to 1.5 beds per 1000 elderly aged 65 years and over.
PubMed ID
9417666 View in PubMed
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Geriatric work-up in the Nordic countries. The Nordic approach to comprehensive geriatric assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211180
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1996 Sep;43(4):350-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
O. Sletvold
R. Tilvis
A. Jonsson
M. Schroll
J. Snaedal
K. Engedal
K. Schultz-Larsen
Y. Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, Municipality Hospital, Copenhagen.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1996 Sep;43(4):350-9
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Finland
Geriatrics - methods - standards
Humans
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Abstract
A group established by the Nordic professors of geriatrics has developed a position document presenting a shared and updated review of geriatric work-up as a way of comprehensive geriatric assessment in the Nordic countries. The main intention is that the document will serve as support and help for the clinician concerned with hospital based geriatric medicine. It may also be useful for quality control and teaching. Not least, it may be useful for health professionals other than geriatricians. To some extent, the position of geriatric medicine in the Nordic countries varies between the countries. However, the background for developing a Nordic version of geriatric work-up is shared attitudes and principally the same organization of the health care system, and collaboration within geriatrics for many years. Several trials on comprehensive geriatric assessment and management performed in different settings have shown favourable outcomes. Results from controlled Nordic trials are compiled and summaries of meta-analyses are presented. The concept of Nordic geriatric work-up is based on a model defining health and disease in old age as dimensions of pathology, impairments, functional limitations, and disability, all being modified by extra- and intraindividual factors. Handicap is defined as the disability gap. Different health professionals have varying responsibilities in the geriatric team-work, but all should be dedicated to establish common goals. The geriatric work-up is presented with success factors and barriers, stating important differences between multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary processes. Checklists and assessment scales may be very useful when performing a geriatric work-up, but they should be used with caution. Specific scales covering different functional areas of the geriatric patient are recommended for clinical practice. Such scales must be valid, reliable, acceptable to the patient, responsive to change, and should be in an appropriate format, as well as easy to administer. Prior to the use among geriatric teams in the Nordic countries the scales should be translated into all the Nordic languages, and the translated versions should ideally have been subjected to validity and reliability testing. However, so far no scale meets these demands regarding all the five Nordic languages.
PubMed ID
8884136 View in PubMed
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High prevalence of anxiety symptoms in hospitalized geriatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193969
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;16(7):690-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
K. Kvaal
J. Macijauskiene
K. Engedal
K. Laake
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Research Group in Geriatrics of the Norwegian National Health Association, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. kari.kvaal@ioks.uio.no
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;16(7):690-3
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
To examine the prevalence of anxiety symptoms in hospitalized geriatric patients.
Controlled cross-sectional study.
Ninety-eight geriatric in-patients and 68 healthy home-dwelling controls of similar age recruited from senior citizen centres.
Anxiety measured as a current emotional state by Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI).
The geriatric patients scored significantly higher than the controls. Applying Spielberger's recommended cut-off of 39/40 on the STAI sumscore, 41% of the female and 47% of the male geriatric patients might be suspected of suffering from significant anxiety symptoms. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease tended to score higher; otherwise no relationship was found between the STAI sumscore and type of chronic somatic disease, nor between the STAI sumscore and number of drugs in regular use.
STAI proved feasible for use in the elderly. The scoring on the STAI is high in geriatric in-patients. Further studies are needed to clarify to what extent this relates to a high prevalence of anxiety disorders.
PubMed ID
11466747 View in PubMed
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[Memory clinic--ambulatory examination in suspected dementia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206970
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3678-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1997
Author
A R Oksengård
A. Braekhus
K. Engedal
K. Laake
Author Affiliation
Geriatrisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3678-80
Date
Oct-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Dementia - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Memory Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Norway
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Abstract
Dementia and confusion are frequently overlooked by general practitioners. A memory clinic was established at the Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevål Hospital in September 1990 with the intention of creating a standardized programme for diagnosing dementia and cognitive impairment in the elderly in an out-patient setting. The activities and services offered by the clinic are described: diagnoses, information to patients, their family and staff in the primary health care system about the symptoms and treatment of dementia. In addition, advice is given on follow-up care and how to apply for care through the national health service. There has been a great demand for the services of the Memory Clinic, and we believe that the methods used are adequate in an out-patient setting. The concept could easily be transferred to other specialist clinics involved with the elderly, and parts of the programme could also be used by general practitioners.
PubMed ID
9417664 View in PubMed
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Mental impairment and driving licences for elderly people--a survey among Norwegian general practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72824
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Dec;14(4):223-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
A. Braekhus
K. Engedal
Author Affiliation
Research Group in Geriatrics, Norwegian Health Association, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Dec;14(4):223-8
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Study how GPs assess mental function when a health certificate for elderly drivers has to be issued. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey. SETTING: Nationwide survey. SUBJECTS: Random sample of 532 Norwegian general practitioners, response rate 54%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Open and closed questions. RESULTS: Various types of examinations and assessments are carried out in this context. More than 50% always assess mental function. Only 22% use formal mental tests, mostly when in doubt. The assessment of elderly patients for a health certificate for driving is regarded by many as a difficult problem. CONCLUSION: There is a lack of uniformity in issuing a health certificate to elderly drivers, a low use of formal cognitive testing, and problems facing GPs in this context. More concrete guidelines and a formal second-line system would facilitate an objective assessment and could also alleviate the burden on the doctor.
PubMed ID
8956450 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.