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Advice-giving styles by finnish nurses in dietary counseling concerning type 2 diabetes care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178345
Source
J Health Commun. 2004 Jul-Aug;9(4):337-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Päivi Kiuru
Marita Poskiparta
Tarja Kettunen
Juha Saltevo
Leena Liimatainen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Health Commun. 2004 Jul-Aug;9(4):337-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diet therapy - nursing
Diet
Finland
Health Services Research
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Abstract
Dietary advice-giving is an important part of dietary counseling in diabetes care and prevention. The strategies of advice-giving, however, have not been explicated and the qualitative characteristics of conversations in diabetes counseling have remained mainly unstudied. This article describes the styles in which nurses responsible for diabetes counseling in Finnish primary care practices offer dietary advice for patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. The data consisted of 55 videotaped naturally occurring counseling sessions between 18 patients and five nurses and were analyzed using typology as an analyzing method. Four different styles of dietary advice-giving were recognized from the speech episodes concerning dietary behavior: recommending, persuasive, supportive, and permitting styles. Recommending style of advice-giving is recognized to be the dominant style that has arisen from the data and, actually, it seems to be the starting point in advice-giving practices. The other styles were used rarely, which suggest that the nurses rely upon quite a narrow selection of communication strategies that helps them to control the topics and the situation, although patient-centered counseling is strongly demanded nowadays. On the basis of our results we suggest that health professionals may need to become more aware of their advice-giving practices in routine situations through conscious effort of self-evaluation. A more detailed analysis of interpersonal conversations during counseling sessions is also needed as it may offer valuable information to promote patients' self-management skills by facilitating observation of conversational elements recognized to be successful in diabetes counseling.
PubMed ID
15371086 View in PubMed
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Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
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Cardiometabolic profile of people screened for high risk of type 2 diabetes in a national diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138828
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2010 Dec;4(4):231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Timo Saaristo
Leena Moilanen
Jari Jokelainen
Eeva Korpi-Hyövälti
Mauno Vanhala
Juha Saltevo
Leo Niskanen
Markku Peltonen
Heikki Oksa
Henna Cederberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Author Affiliation
Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland. timo.saaristo@pshp.fi
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2010 Dec;4(4):231-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Glucose Intolerance - blood - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Primary Health Care
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
To study screening of high-risk individuals as part of a national diabetes prevention programme in primary health care settings in Finland between 2003 and 2007, and evaluate the cardiometabolic risk profile of persons identified for intervention.
High-risk individuals were identified by the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), history of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), cardiovascular disease (CVD), or gestational diabetes. Participants subsequently underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. CVD morbidity risk was estimated by the Framingham Study Risk Equation and CVD mortality risk by the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Formula (SCORE).
A high-risk cohort of 10,149 (of whom 30.3% men) was identified (mean age 54.7 for men, 53.0 for women). Altogether 18.8% of men and 11.5% of women had screen-detected diabetes. In total 68.1% of men and 49.4% of women had abnormal glucose tolerance (IFG, IGT or screen-detected diabetes). Furthermore, 43.2% and 41.5% of men, and 13.3% and 11.3% of women, respectively, had a high predicted risk of CVD morbidity or mortality.
Prevalence of dysglycemia including undiagnosed diabetes and the predicted risk for CVD was alarmly high in the identified high-risk cohort, particularly in men.
PubMed ID
21134669 View in PubMed
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Erythropoietin, ferritin, haptoglobin, hemoglobin and transferrin receptor in metabolic syndrome: a case control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120324
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:116
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Päivi Hämäläinen
Juha Saltevo
Hannu Kautiainen
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Mauno Vanhala
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Teiskontie, Tampere, Finland. Paivi.O.Hamalainen@uta.fi
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:116
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - blood - ethnology
Erythropoietin - blood
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Ferritins - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Metabolism Disorders - blood - ethnology
Haptoglobins - analysis
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Hypertension - blood - ethnology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - ethnology
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - blood - ethnology
Receptors, Transferrin - blood
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Increased ferritin concentrations are associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The association between ferritin as well as hemoglobin level and individual MetS components is unclear. Erythropoietin levels in subjects with MetS have not been determined previously. The aim of this study was to compare serum erythropoietin, ferritin, haptoglobin, hemoglobin, and transferrin receptor (sTFR) levels between subjects with and without MetS and subjects with individual MetS components.
A population based cross-sectional study of 766 Caucasian, middle-aged subjects (341 men and 425 women) from five age groups born in Pieksämäki, Finland who were invited to a health check-up in 2004 with no exclusion criteria. Laboratory analyzes of blood samples collected in 2004 were done during year 2010. MetS was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program criteria.
159 (53%) men and 170 (40%) women of study population met MetS criteria. Hemoglobin and ferritin levels as well as erythropoietin and haptoglobin levels were higher in subjects with MetS (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23016887 View in PubMed
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Gender differences relating to metabolic syndrome and proinflammation in Finnish subjects with elevated blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148924
Source
Mediators Inflamm. 2009;2009:959281
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Tiina Ahonen
Juha Saltevo
Markku Laakso
Hannu Kautiainen
Esko Kumpusalo
Mauno Vanhala
Author Affiliation
Palokka Health Center, 40270 Jyväskylä, Finland. tiina.ahonen@fimnet.fi
Source
Mediators Inflamm. 2009;2009:959281
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammation - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - metabolism
Interleukin-1beta - immunology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - metabolism - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Sex Factors
Abstract
Fasting insulin, adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) were determined in 278 men and 273 women with blood pressure > or = 130 and/or > or = 85 mmHg and/or with antihypertensive medication. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) with the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria was observed in 35% of men and 34% of women. Men with MetS had lower hs-CRP and IL-1Ra than women. The absolute gender difference in adiponectin was smaller and those in IL-1Ra and hs-CRP were greater in subjects with MetS compared to those without. After adjustment with body mass index the association between insulin and the odd's ratio (OR) for MetS remained significant in both genders, in females also the association between the OR for MetS and adiponectin. There are gender differences in subjects with elevated blood pressure and MetS with respect to inflammatory markers and the relationship between adiponectin levels and MetS.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19707530 View in PubMed
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Glucose status and depressive symptoms: a cohort study of elderly people in northwest Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299985
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2019 May 17; :1-7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-17-2019
Author
Yrjö Perkkiö
Jari Jokelainen
Juha Auvinen
Pasi Eskola
Juha Saltevo
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Markku Timonen
Author Affiliation
a Center for Life Course Health Research, Faculty of Medicine , University of Oulu , Oulu , Finland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2019 May 17; :1-7
Date
May-17-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To assess the association between depressive symptoms and impaired glucose metabolism in the elderly population in arctic latitudes.
A population-based study.
Community.
The study population consisted of 1,830 subjects born between the years 1915 and 1958 in the northernmost part of Finland, the Muonio-Enontekiö district, who participated in a health survey during 1974-1984. In 2014, a health questionnaire was sent to 1,037 subjects, and 757 participants (73%) answered it. Those (n?=?629) living in the Muonio-Enontekiö district undergone a clinical examination in 2014 and 2015 including blood collections.
Depressive symptoms defined by the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II) with a cut-off point of 14. Different diabetic states based on WHO's classification criteria defined by fasting plasma glucose and ADA's criteria by glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) values.
According to logistic regression analysis, depressive symptoms (BDI-II = 14) were associated statistically significantly with previously known type 2 diabetes, the odds ratio (OR) being 4.33 (95% CI 1.53-14.14). Regarding prediabetic fasting glucose/HbA1c values, the corresponding OR was 2.94 (95% CI 1.17-8.94). The prevalence of depressive symptoms (BDI-II = 14) was 7.1%, (men 9.7% and women 5.4%) and 13.7% (men 9.9% and women 17.0%) in subjects living in Muonio-Enontekiö district and in those who had moved away from there, respectively.
The association of depressive symptoms between prediabetes and diabetes seems to be present also in the northernmost latitudes of the world.
PubMed ID
31099298 View in PubMed
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Glycemic control and health-related quality of life among older home-dwelling primary care patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293508
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anna-Kaisa Aro
Merja Karjalainen
Miia Tiihonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Maija Haanpää
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Rantakylä Health Center, Siunsote, Finland. Electronic address: koistine@student.uef.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mental health
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Mobility Limitation
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity in relation to glycemic control among older home-dwelling primary care patients.
Electronic patient records were used to identify 527 people over 65 years with diabetes. Of these, 259 randomly selected subjects were invited to a health examination and 172 of them attended and provided complete data. The participants were divided into three groups based on the HbA1c: good (HbA1c57mmol/mol (N=29)) glycemic control. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire. Functional and cognitive capacity and mental well-being were assessed with the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15).
EQ-5D scores for good, intermediate and poor glycemic control were 0.78; 0.74 and 0.70, p=0.037. Sub-items of mobility (p=0.002) and self-care were the most affected (p=0.031). Corresponding trend was found for IADL, p=0.008. A significant correlation was found between MMSE scores and HbA1c.
Older primary care home-dwelling patients with diabetes and poorer glycemic control have lower functional capacity and HRQoL, especially in regard to mobility and self-care.
PubMed ID
28754430 View in PubMed
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Hemoglobin level and lipoprotein particle size.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294299
Source
Lipids Health Dis. 2018 Jan 10; 17(1):10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-10-2018
Author
Päivi Hämäläinen
Juha Saltevo
Hannu Kautiainen
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Mauno Vanhala
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Teiskontie 35, 33521, Tampere, Finland. Paivi.o.hamalainen@pshp.fi.
Source
Lipids Health Dis. 2018 Jan 10; 17(1):10
Date
Jan-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Lipoproteins, VLDL - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Particle Size
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Alterations in lipoprotein size are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Higher hemoglobin levels may indicate a higher risk of atherosclerosis and was previously associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance. No previous studies have investigated an association between hemoglobin concentration and lipoprotein particle size.
We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study of 766 Caucasian, middle-aged subjects (341 men and 425 women) born in Pieksämäki, Finland, who were categorized into five age groups. The concentrations and sizes of lipoprotein subclass particles were analyzed by high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
Larger very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle diameter was associated with higher hemoglobin concentrations in men (p = 0.003). There was a strong relationship between smaller high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size and higher hemoglobin concentration in both men and women as well as with smaller low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and higher hemoglobin concentration in men and women (p 
Notes
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PubMed ID
29321013 View in PubMed
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High serum adiponectin is associated with favorable lipoprotein subclass profile in 6.4-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137979
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2011 Apr;164(4):549-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Mauno Vanhala
Linda S Kumpula
Pasi Soininen
Antti J Kangas
Mika Ala-Korpela
Hannu Kautiainen
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Juha Saltevo
Author Affiliation
Unit of General Practice, Central Finland Central Hospital, Keskussairaalantie 19, 40620 Jyväskylä, Finland. mauno.vanhala@ksshp.fi
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2011 Apr;164(4):549-52
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, VLDL - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Abstract
Adiponectin is linked to a favorable lipoprotein profile, but potential longitudinal associations are not known.
A population-based follow-up study of all inhabitants born in 1942, 1947, 1952, and 1957 (n=1294) in Pieksämäki, a town in Finland. Of the 690 subjects participating in both the check-ups, 228 subjects with diabetes or any medication for dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, or diabetes were excluded. The final study population consisted of 462 (182 men and 280 women) apparently healthy subjects.
Main outcome measures were lipoprotein particle sizes and concentrations, apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1) and APOB levels at baseline and follow-up across baseline adiponectin tertiles. Serum adiponectin concentrations were determined using an enzyme immunoassay, and lipoprotein subclasses using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
At the second health check-up 6.4 years later, the very low-density lipoprotein particle concentration decreased across the baseline adiponectin tertiles in men from 1.04 (0.28) to 0.91 (0.29) nmol/l (P for linearity=0.011) and in women from 0.92 (0.32) to 0.80 (0.24) nmol/l (P=0.002). Correspondingly, the mean high-density lipoprotein particle size increased from 9.78 to 9.90?nm in men (P
PubMed ID
21224405 View in PubMed
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Lifestyle intervention for prevention of type 2 diabetes in primary health care: one-year follow-up of the Finnish National Diabetes Prevention Program (FIN-D2D).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141877
Source
Diabetes Care. 2010 Oct;33(10):2146-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Timo Saaristo
Leena Moilanen
Eeva Korpi-Hyövälti
Mauno Vanhala
Juha Saltevo
Leo Niskanen
Jari Jokelainen
Markku Peltonen
Heikki Oksa
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Author Affiliation
Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2010 Oct;33(10):2146-51
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Risk factors
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate 1-year outcomes of a national diabetes prevention program in Finland.
Altogether 10,149 individuals at high risk for diabetes were identified with the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC; scoring =15 points), by a history of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), cardiovascular disease, or gestational diabetes mellitus in 400 primary health care centers. One-year follow-up data were available for 2,798 participants who were nondiabetic at baseline (919 men and 1,879 women, aged 56.0 ± 9.9 and 54.0 ± 10.7 years [mean ± SD] with BMI 30.9 ± 4.6 and 31.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2)).
The incidence of diabetes was 2.0 and 1.2% in men and women with normal glucose tolerance at baseline, 13.5 and 7.4% in those with IFG, and 16.1 and 11.3% in those with IGT, respectively. Altogether 17.5% of the subjects lost = 5% weight with no sex difference. The relative risk of diabetes was 0.31 (95% CI 0.16-0.59) in the group who lost = 5% weight, 0.72 (0.46-1.13) in the group who lost 2.5-4.9% weight, and 1.10 (0.77-1.58) in the group who gained = 2.5% compared with the group who maintained weight.
The FIN-D2D was the first national effort to implement the prevention of diabetes in a primary health care setting. Methods for recruiting high-risk subjects were simple and easy to use. Moderate weight loss in this very high-risk group was especially effective in reducing risk of diabetes among those participating in the program.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20664020 View in PubMed
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