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Effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline on the ear vessel in cold- and warm- adapted rabbits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298681
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-23. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1962
  1 document  
Author
Honda, N.
Judy, W.V.
Carlson, L.D.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-23. 16 p.
Date
October 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1512644
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rabbits
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Adrenaline
Noradrenaline
Acclimatized
Abstract
Cold exposure increases the secretion of catechol amines and enhances the effect of these hormones on metabolism. Whether the sensitivity of peripheral vessels to epinephrine and norepinephrine is altered by cold exposure has not been reported. Warm- adapted (27° ± 1° C) and cold-adapted (5° ± 1 ° C) rabbits were studied under chloralose and urethane anesthesia. Epinephrine and norepinephrine were infused (3 gamma/kg/min) through an ear vein. Rectal plus ear temperature, EKG, blood flow and venous pressure in the ear were measured. Compliance of veins was calculated from the ?V / ?P at pressures between 20 and 30 mm Hg.
After prolonged cold exposure rabbits responded to catechol amine infusion (adrenaline and noradrenaline) with less change in heart rate during infusion and a more rapid return to control levels following infusion; with less decrease in ear temperature during infusion and a more rapid return to control levels following infusion; less increase in peripheral resistance, and less effect on compliance of the capacitance vessels (veins).
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-23
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The influence of ambient temperature on the relation between skin temperature and blood flow in the rabbit ear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298693
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-45. 10 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 1963
  1 document  
Author
Honda, N.
Carlson, L.D.
Judy, W.V.
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Physiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-45. 10 p.
Date
April 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1040075
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rabbit
Temperature
Body temperature
Blood Circulation
Ears
Thermal Conductivity
Abstract
The relation of skin temperature and blood flow in the rabbit ear constants vary with ambient temperature, probably reflecting the degree of precooling that occurs in the circulating blood.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-45
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Influence of prior cold exposure in peripheral vascular reaction on rabbit ear induced by abrupt cold exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298659
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical Documentary report TDR-61-50.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1962
  1 document  
Author
Honda, N.
Judy, W.V.
Carlson, L.D.
Author Affiliation
University of Kentucky
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical Documentary report TDR-61-50.
Date
May 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1093484
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rabbits
Cold Temperature
Blood Vessels
Circulation
Abstract
The influence of prior cold exposure on vasoconstriction induced by abrupt cold exposure has been studied in the rabbit ear. Dutch breed rabbits were individually caged outdoors (maximum temperature, 21° C; minimum, -7° C; average, 5. 9° C) and a control group was kept at 27° C over a five month period. Three groups of New Zealand rabbits were divided to be exposed to 27° C, 5° C, and 5° C day and 27° C night temperatures.
Rectal, ear and body surface temperatures, heat loss from the ear, and blood flow in the ear were recorded at 27° C, 23° C and 5° C. In general, at 23°and 27° C there was no difference between the groups of rabbits. After one hour exposure to 5° C, outdoor and 5° C groups had a low blood flow to the ear and had no decline in rectal temperature. Other groups, however, had a decrease in rectal temperature and higher ear blood flow. After 12 to 18 hours exposure to 5° C, rectal temperature. returned to original values in the 27° C animals; blood flow to the ear decreased slightly. Ear blood flow in outdoor and 5° C rabbits increased during this period.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-50
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