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An increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations preceded a plateau in type 1 diabetes incidence in Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259846
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2353-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Marjaana Mäkinen
Ville Simell
Juha Mykkänen
Jorma Ilonen
Riitta Veijola
Heikki Hyöty
Mikael Knip
Olli Simell
Jorma Toppari
Robert Hermann
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2353-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food, Fortified
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
In Finland the world-record for the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen steeply over the past decades. However, after 2006 the incidence rate has plateaued. We showed earlier, that despite the strong genetic disease component, environmental factors are driving the increasing disease incidence.
Since vitamin D intake has increased considerably in the country since 2003, we analyzed how serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration changed over time in healthy children, and the timely relation of these changes to disease incidence.
The birth cohort of the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention project was used to explore longitudinal changes in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin concentrations. The sampling period was limited to children born from 1994 to 2004, with serum samples collected during 1998-2006 in the Turku area, Southwest Finland (60 ?N).
25(OH)D concentrations were measured every 3-6 months from birth, ages ranging from 0.3 to 12.2 years (387 subjects, 5334 measurements).
Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were markedly lower before 2003 than after (69.3 ? 1.0 nmol/L vs 84.9 ? 1.3 nmol/L, respectively, P
PubMed ID
25062454 View in PubMed
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Association between levels of persistent organic pollutants in adipose tissue and cryptorchidism in early childhood: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272722
Source
Environ Health. 2015;14:78
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jaakko J Koskenniemi
Helena E Virtanen
Hannu Kiviranta
Ida N Damgaard
Jaakko Matomäki
Jørgen M Thorup
Timo Hurme
Niels E Skakkebaek
Katharina M Main
Jorma Toppari
Source
Environ Health. 2015;14:78
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Benzofurans - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cryptorchidism - chemically induced - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dioxins - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - toxicity
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Congenital cryptorchidism, i.e. failure of the testicular descent to the bottom of the scrotum, is a common birth defect. The evidence from epidemiological, wildlife, and animal studies suggests that exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals during fetal development may play a role in its pathogenesis. We aimed to assess the association between cryptorchidism and prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).
We conducted a case-control study consisting of 44 cryptorchid cases, and 38 controls operated for inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, or hydrocele at the Turku University Hospital or Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen in 2002-2006. During the operation a subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy was taken. Samples were analysed for 37 PCBs, 17 PCDD/Fs and 14 PBDEs by gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. Chemical concentrations were adjusted for postnatal variation introduced by differences in duration of breastfeeding, age at the operation, and country of origin with a multiple linear regression. Association between adjusted and unadjusted chemical concentrations and the risk of cryptorchidism were analysed with logistic regression to get an estimate for odds ratio (OR) of cryptorchidism per multiplication of chemical concentrations with ca. 2.71 (Napier's constant).
Total-TEq i.e. the WHO-recommended 2,3,7,8-TCDD equivalent quantity of 17 dioxins and 12 dioxin-like PCBs and sum of PCDD/Fs were positively associated with cryptorchidism [OR 3.21 (95% CI 1.29-9.09), OR 3.69 (95% CI 1.45-10.9), respectively], when adjusting for country of origin, the duration the child was breastfed, and age at operation. The association between the sum of PCBs and cryptorchidism was close to significant [OR 1.92 (95% CI 0.98-4.01)], whereas the association between the sum of PBDEs and cryptorchidism was not [OR 0.86 (95% CI 0.47-1.54)]. There were no associations between unadjusted chemical concentrations and the risk of cryptorchidism.
Prenatal exposure to PCDD/Fs and PCDD/F-like PCBs may be associated with increased risk for cryptorchidism. Our finding does not exclude the possibility of an association between the exposure to PBDEs and cryptorchidism.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26403566 View in PubMed
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Association of in utero exposure to maternal smoking with reduced semen quality and testis size in adulthood: a cross-sectional study of 1,770 young men from the general population in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63426
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jan 1;159(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2004
Author
Tina Kold Jensen
Niels Jørgensen
Margus Punab
Trine B Haugen
Jyrki Suominen
Birute Zilaitiene
Antero Horte
Anne-Grethe Andersen
Elisabeth Carlsen
Øystein Magnus
Valentinas Matulevicius
Ingrid Nermoen
Matti Vierula
Niels Keiding
Jorma Toppari
Niels E Skakkebaek
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. tkjensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jan 1;159(1):49-58
Date
Jan-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Genital Diseases, Male - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Semen - physiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Sperm Count
Testis - pathology
Abstract
Between 1996 and 1999, the authors invited all young men from five European countries who were undergoing compulsory medical examination for possible military service to participate in a study on male reproductive health. The participation rate was 19% in two cities in Denmark (n = 889), 17% in Oslo, Norway (n = 221), 13% in Turku, Finland (n = 313), 14% in Kaunas, Lithuania (n = 157), and 19% in Tartu, Estonia (n = 190). Each man provided a semen sample, was examined by a physician, and, in collaboration with his mother, completed a questionnaire about general and reproductive health, current smoking habits, and exposure to smoking in utero. After adjustment for confounding factors, men exposed to smoking in utero had a reduction in sperm concentration of 20.1% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.8, 33.5) and a reduction in total sperm count of 24.5% (95% CI: 9.5, 39.5) in comparison with unexposed men. Percentages of motile and morphologically normal sperm cells were 1.85 (95% CI: 0.46, 3.23) and 0.64 (95% CI: -0.02, 1.30) percentage points lower, respectively, among men exposed in utero, and exposed men had a 1.15-ml (95% CI: 0.66, 1.64) smaller testis size. The associations were present when data from the study centers were analyzed separately (though not in Lithuania, where only 1% of mothers smoked during pregnancy), although the strength of the association varied. Maternal smoking may have long-term implications for the reproductive health of the offspring. This is another good reason to advise pregnant women to avoid smoking.
PubMed ID
14693659 View in PubMed
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Association of placenta organotin concentrations with congenital cryptorchidism and reproductive hormone levels in 280 newborn boys from Denmark and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115317
Source
Hum Reprod. 2013 Jun;28(6):1647-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Panu Rantakokko
Katharina M Main
Christine Wohlfart-Veje
Hannu Kiviranta
Riikka Airaksinen
Terttu Vartiainen
Niels E Skakkebæk
Jorma Toppari
Helena E Virtanen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, Chemical Exposure Unit, Neulaniementie 4, FI-70210 Kuopio, Finland. panu.rantakokko@thl.fi
Source
Hum Reprod. 2013 Jun;28(6):1647-60
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cryptorchidism - etiology
Denmark
Endocrine Disruptors - metabolism
Female
Finland
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Gonadotropins, Pituitary - blood
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Organotin Compounds - metabolism
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Trialkyltin Compounds - metabolism
Abstract
Is the placental burden of organotin compounds (OTCs) associated with congenital cryptorchidism in infant offspring from Finland and Denmark?
Increasing concentrations of OTCs had a negative association with cryptorchidism in Finland, whereas a positive association was found in Denmark.
The rapid increase in the prevalence of cryptorchidism suggests that environmental factors, such as endocrine disruptors, may be involved. OTCs are endocrine disruptors at very low concentrations due to activation of the retinoid X receptor (RXR).
Between the years 1997 and 2001, placentas from mothers of cryptorchid boys and from healthy controls were collected from Denmark (39 cases, 129 controls) and Finland (56 cases, 56 controls). In Denmark 33 and 6 boys, and in Finland 22 and 34 boys had mild or severe cryptorchidism, respectively. The association between concentrations of four OTCs [monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT)] and case-control status was estimated.
In both countries, placenta samples were selected from larger cohorts. In Finland placenta samples were collected from boys with cryptorchidism at birth and matched controls (nested case-control design). Matching criteria were parity, maternal smoking (yes/no), diabetes (yes/no), gestational age (±7 days) and date of birth (±14 days). Numbers of controls per case was 1. In Denmark, all available placentas from cryptorchid boys were chosen and control placentas were selected randomly from the total Danish cohort (case-cohort design). The average number of controls per case was 3.3. OTCs in placenta samples were analysed with liquid extraction, ethylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination and coded by country-specific tertiles.
Generally, the concentrations of OTCs were very low. For most analytes, a large proportion of samples (29-96% depending on the country and case-control status) had OTC concentrations below the limit of quantification (LOQ). As an exception, the concentration of TBT was >LOQ in 99% of Finnish placentas. The mean concentrations of DBT and TBT were 1.5 and 7 times higher in Finland than in Denmark, respectively. For DBT in Danish placentas, the odds ratio (OR) for cryptorchidism in the second tertile (0.10-0.14 ng/g) when compared with the first tertile (
PubMed ID
23520400 View in PubMed
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Association of placenta organotin concentrations with growth and ponderal index in 110 newborn boys from Finland during the first 18 months of life: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257106
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13(1):45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Panu Rantakokko
Katharina M Main
Christine Wohlfart-Veje
Hannu Kiviranta
Riikka Airaksinen
Terttu Vartiainen
Niels E Skakkebæk
Jorma Toppari
Helena E Virtanen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, Toxicology and Chemical Exposure Unit, Neulaniementie 4, FI-70210 Kuopio, Finland. panu.rantakokko@thl.fi.
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13(1):45
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Development
Cohort Studies
Cryptorchidism - epidemiology
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Organotin Compounds - analysis
Placenta - chemistry
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Humans are exposed to tributyltin (TBT), previously used as an antifouling paint in ships, mainly through fish consumption. As TBT is a known obesogen, we studied the association of placenta TBT and other organotin compounds (OTCs) with ponderal index (PI) and growth during the first 18 months of life in boys.
In a prospective Finnish study, 110 placenta samples were collected from mothers of boys born in 1997-1999 with (n?=?55) and without (n?=?55) cryptorchidism. To account for the original study design, linear regression, weighted for sampling fractions of boys with (121/55) and without (5677/55) cryptorchidism from the total cohort, was used to study the association between placenta OTCs and children's weight, length, growth rates and PI up to 18 months of age.
Placenta TBT concentrations were above the limit of quantification (LOQ) in 99% of the samples. However, monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) concentrations were below LOQ in 90%, 35% and 57% of samples, respectively. Placenta TBT was positively associated (p?=?0.024) with weight gain during the first three months of life, but no other significant associations were observed for weight or length gain. Also, no significant associations between placenta OTC concentrations and child length, weight or PI at any time point were found.
We observed a trend towards higher weight gain from birth to 3 months of age with increasing placenta TBT concentration. These results should be interpreted with caution because obesogenic effects in animal experiments were seen after in-utero TBT exposures to doses that were orders of magnitude higher. Also the number of study subjects included in this study was limited.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24899383 View in PubMed
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Carotenoid Intake and Serum Concentration in Young Finnish Children and Their Relation with Fruit and Vegetable Consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297466
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-17-2018
Author
Marianne Prasad
Hanna-Mari Takkinen
Liisa Uusitalo
Heli Tapanainen
Marja-Leena Ovaskainen
Georg Alfthan
Iris Erlund
Suvi Ahonen
Mari Åkerlund
Jorma Toppari
Jorma Ilonen
Mikael Knip
Riitta Veijola
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health Solutions, The National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. marianne.prasad@thl.fi.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Date
Oct-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Carotenoids - administration & dosage - blood
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Fruit
Humans
Infant
Male
Vegetables
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases. These foods are the main dietary source of carotenoids. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the associations between dietary intake and serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene in a sample of young Finnish children from the population-based birth cohort of the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study. The current analysis comprised 3-day food records and serum samples from 207 children aged 1, 2 and 3 years. Spearman and partial correlations, as well as a cross-classification analyses, were used to assess the relationship between dietary intake and the corresponding biomarkers. Serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene were significantly higher among the 1-year-old compared to the 3-year-old children. Dietary intakes of a- and ß-carotene correlated significantly with their respective serum concentrations in all age groups, the association being highest at the age of 1 year (a-carotene r = 0.48; p
PubMed ID
30336644 View in PubMed
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Changes in male reproductive health and effects of endocrine disruptors in Scandinavian countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190806
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2002 Mar-Apr;18(2):413-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jorma Toppari
Anne-Maarit Haavisto
Markku Alanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. jorma.toppari@utu.fi
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2002 Mar-Apr;18(2):413-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cryptorchidism - chemically induced - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Hypospadias - chemically induced - epidemiology
Infertility, Male - etiology
Male
Reproduction - drug effects
Reproductive Medicine
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Semen - physiology
Testicular Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Male reproductive health has deteriorated in many ways during the last decades. The incidence of testicular cancer has rapidly increased in Europe and European-derived populations. Sperm concentrations have declined and sperm motility and morphology have worsened in many areas. Both adverse trends have been shown to be associated with year of birth. Older birth cohorts have better reproductive health than the younger generations. Incidences of cryptorchidism and hypospadias have also increased according to several studies. The reasons for secular trends are unknown, but the rapid pace of the change points to environmental causes. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been hypothesized to influence male reproductive health.
PubMed ID
11923882 View in PubMed
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Characterisation of rapid progressors to type 1 diabetes among children with HLA-conferred disease susceptibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291762
Source
Diabetologia. 2017 07; 60(7):1284-1293
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Petra M Pöllänen
Johanna Lempainen
Antti-Pekka Laine
Jorma Toppari
Riitta Veijola
Paula Vähäsalo
Jorma Ilonen
Heli Siljander
Mikael Knip
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, P.O. Box 22, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diabetologia. 2017 07; 60(7):1284-1293
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - genetics - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutamate Decarboxylase - metabolism
HLA Antigens - genetics
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
Humans
Infant
Insulin-Secreting Cells - immunology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prevalence
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
In this study, we aimed to characterise rapid progressors to type 1 diabetes among children recruited from the general population, on the basis of HLA-conferred disease susceptibility.
We monitored 7410 HLA-predisposed children participating in the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study for the development of beta cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes from birth over a median follow-up time of 16.2 years (range 0.9-21.1 years). Islet cell antibodies (ICA) and autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), GAD (GADA) and islet antigen 2 (IA-2A) were assessed as markers of beta cell autoimmunity. Rapid progression was defined as progression to clinical type 1 diabetes within 1.5 years of autoantibody seroconversion. We analysed the association between rapid progression and demographic and autoantibody characteristics as well as genetic markers, including 25 non-HLA SNPs predisposing to type 1 diabetes.
Altogether, 1550 children (21%) tested positive for at least one diabetes-associated autoantibody in at least two samples, and 248 (16%) of seroconverters progressed to type 1 diabetes by the end of 2015. The median time from seroconversion to diagnosis was 0.51 years in rapid progressors (n = 42, 17%) and 5.4 years in slower progressors. Rapid progression was observed both among young (7 years), resulting in a double-peak distribution of seroconversion age. Compared with slower progressors, rapid progressors had a higher frequency of positivity for multiple (=2) autoantibodies and had higher titres of ICA, IAA and IA-2A at seroconversion, and there was a higher prevalence of the secretor genotype in the FUT2 gene among those carrying the high-risk HLA genotype. Compared with autoantibody-positive non-progressors, rapid progressors were younger, were more likely to carry the high-risk HLA genotype and a predisposing SNP in the PTPN22 gene, had higher frequency of ICA, IAA, GADA and IA-2A positivity and multipositivity, and had higher titres of all four autoantibodies at seroconversion.
At seroconversion, individuals with rapid progression to type 1 diabetes were characterised by a younger age, higher autoantibody titres, positivity for multiple autoantibodies and higher prevalence of a FUT2 SNP. The double-peak profile for seroconversion age among the rapid progressors demonstrates for the first time that rapid progression may take place not only in young children but also in children in early puberty. Rapid progressors might benefit from careful clinical follow-up and early preventive measures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28364254 View in PubMed
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Circannual rhythm in the incidence of cryptorchidism in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176412
Source
Int J Androl. 2005 Feb;28(1):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Marko Kaleva
Helena E Virtanen
Anne-Maarit Haavisto
Katharina M Main
Mikko Reunanen
Niels E Skakkebaek
Jorma Toppari
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland. marko.kaleva@utu.fi
Source
Int J Androl. 2005 Feb;28(1):53-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm
Cryptorchidism - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Abstract
Conflicting data on circannual variation in birth rates of urogenital malformations have been reported previously. To assess risk factors of cryptorchidism we studied the seasonal variation of cryptorchidism in Finland. We performed a prospective cryptorchidism study in Turku, Finland, from 1997 to 2001 to evaluate the incidence of cryptorchidism. Clinical examinations were performed at birth and at 3 months. Of 9511 liveborn boys (1471 preterm boys) 216 (53 preterm boys) were cryptorchid at birth and 106 (19 preterm boys) at 3 months. The incidence of cryptorchidism was significantly higher in spring (February-April) (3.0%) than in summer (May-July) (1.7%) (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.23-2.63). This seasonal difference was observed both among preterm and term boys. We conclude that a circannual fluctuation in the incidence of cryptorchidism exists, which indicates an influence by environmental factors. The underlying reason for cyclicity affects similarly both preterm and term boys.
PubMed ID
15679622 View in PubMed
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Class II HLA Genotype Association With First-Phase Insulin Response Is Explained by Islet Autoantibodies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299035
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 08 01; 103(8):2870-2878
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2018
Author
Maarit K Koskinen
Johanna Lempainen
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Olli Helminen
Anne Hekkala
Taina Härkönen
Minna Kiviniemi
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Jorma Ilonen
Jorma Toppari
Riitta Veijola
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 08 01; 103(8):2870-2878
Date
08-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - genetics - immunology
Female
Finland
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glucose Tolerance Test
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Humans
Infant
Insulin - blood - immunology
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Male
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A declining first-phase insulin response (FPIR) is characteristic of the disease process leading to clinical type 1 diabetes. It is not known whether reduced FPIR depends on class II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype, islet autoimmunity, or both.
To dissect the role of class II HLA DR-DQ genotypes and biochemical islet autoantibodies in the compromised FPIR.
A total of 438 children with defined HLA DR-DQ genotype in the prospective Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study were analyzed for FPIR in a total of 1149 intravenous glucose tolerance tests and were categorized by their HLA DR-DQ genotype and the number of biochemical islet autoantibodies at the time of the first FPIR. Age-adjusted hierarchical linear mixed models were used to analyze repeated measurements of FPIR.
The associations between class II HLA DR-DQ genotype, islet autoantibody status, and FPIR.
A strong association between the degree of risk conferred by HLA DR-DQ genotype and positivity for islet autoantibodies existed (P
PubMed ID
29300921 View in PubMed
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