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The association between serum parathyroid hormone and bone mineral density, and the impact of smoking: the Tromso Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87234
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2008 Mar;158(3):401-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Sneve Monica
Emaus Nina
Joakimsen Ragnar Martin
Jorde Rolf
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway. monica.sneve@unn.no
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2008 Mar;158(3):401-9
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forearm
Hip Joint
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - blood - epidemiology
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore the relation between serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone mineral density (BMD), adjusted for lifestyle factors including smoking. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: The Troms? Study is a population-based study performed for the fifth time in 2001. Serum PTH was measured and the subjects filled in a questionnaire covering lifestyle factors. BMD at the hip, distal and ultradistal forearm was measured. RESULTS: Complete datasets were available in 1442 men and 1368 women. Age, body mass index and serum PTH were strong predictors of BMD level at the hip in both genders. No significant relation was seen between serum PTH and BMD at the distal or ultradistal forearm. When smokers and non-smokers were analysed separately, the relation between PTH and BMD at the hip was significant in current non-smokers only. In males, current non-smokers had significantly higher BMD at all three measurement sites compared with current smokers. Male former smokers had values in between current and never smokers. There was a significant and negative relation between number of years smoked and BMD at the hip. In male former smokers, there was an increase in BMD with increasing years since smoking cessation. CONCLUSION: Serum PTH is negatively associated with BMD at the hip, and the relation seems to be masked, or diminished, by smoking. Smoking reduces BMD at the hip, distal and ultradistal forearm in males, and the effect appears to be mainly time and not dose dependent.
PubMed ID
18299475 View in PubMed
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Early diabetic neuropathy: thermal thresholds and intraepidermal nerve fibre density in patients with normal nerve conduction studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92916
Source
J Neurol. 2008 Aug;255(8):1197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Løseth Sissel
Stålberg Erik
Jorde Rolf
Mellgren Svein Ivar
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø and University Hospital of North Norway, 9038, Tromsø, Norway. sissel.loseth@unn.no
Source
J Neurol. 2008 Aug;255(8):1197-202
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biophysical Processes
Diabetic Neuropathies - pathology - physiopathology
Electric Stimulation - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neural Conduction - physiology
Norway
Peripheral Nerves - physiopathology
Sensory Thresholds - physiology
Skin - innervation
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES : To determine whether neuropathy in diabetic patients with normal nerve conduction studies could be detected by measurements of thermal thresholds and quantification of intraepidermal nerve fibre (IENF) density, and to evaluate differences in parameters between patients with and without neuropathic symptoms. METHODS : A total of 22 patients with and 37 patients without sensory symptoms suggesting distal neuropathy were included. Measurements of warm and cold perception thresholds and skin biopsy for quantification of IENFs were performed distally on the leg. Reference data were used to normalize test results for age and height or gender of individual patients by calculating the Z-scores. RESULTS : IENF density was significantly reduced in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients compared to controls (p
PubMed ID
18574618 View in PubMed
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Lack of significant association between intima-media thickness in the carotid artery and serum TSH level. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87265
Source
Thyroid. 2008 Jan;18(1):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Jorde Rolf
Joakimsen Oddmund
Stensland Eva
Mathiesen Ellisiv B
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
Thyroid. 2008 Jan;18(1):21-5
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - pathology
Carotid Arteries - pathology - ultrasonography
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Thyrotropin - blood
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - pathology - ultrasonography
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Increased arterial wall intima-media thickness (IMT) is an early feature of atherosclerosis and has been reported to be altered in patients with thyroid dysfunction. The present study was performed to examine the relation between carotid artery intima-media thickness and possible variations in thyroid function in normal subjects using serum TSH as a surrogate index of thyroid function. DESIGN: A total of 2034 subjects (974 males) were studied, 1856 or whom were non-users of thyroxine. The subjects not taking thyroxine were classified into three groups, those with a low serum TSH (0.48 mIU/L (2.5 percentile, those with serum TSH from 0.48 to 4.16 mIU/L, and those with high serum TSH of >4.16 mIU/L (97.5 percentile). Carotid ultrasound was performed in each all 2034 subjects to determine IMT. RESULTS: Among those not taking thyroxine, subjects in the low serum TSH group had a higher mean IMT as compared to those in the normal and high serum TSH groups but the differences were not significant when adjusted for gender, age, smoking status, body mass index, systolic blood pressure and serum cholesterol (0.88 +/- 0.15 mm, 0.84 +/- 0.16 mm, and 0.84 +/- 0.24 mm respectively). Subjects taking thyroxine had significantly higher IMT than those not taking thyroxine (0.89 + 0.20 mm versus 0.84 + 0.17 mm, p
PubMed ID
17985996 View in PubMed
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Measuring gonadotropins is of limited value in detecting hypogonadism in ageing men: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85241
Source
Int J Androl. 2007 Oct;30(5):445-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Svartberg Johan
Jorde Rolf
Author Affiliation
Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. johan.svartberg@unn.no
Source
Int J Androl. 2007 Oct;30(5):445-51
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Gonadotropins - blood
Humans
Hypogonadism - diagnosis
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Abstract
Testosterone levels decrease with age. The mechanisms responsible for the age-related decrease in testosterone concentration are still being debated, and probably involve all three levels of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis. Luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration is often measured in combination with testosterone, but its value is questionable when considering the testosterone levels of older men. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations of endogenous gonadotropin and testosterone levels both in a cross-sectional cohort of 3447 men participating in the fifth Tromsø study and longitudinally in a cohort of 1352 men participating in both the fourth and the fifth Tromsø study. Total testosterone, LH, follicle-stimulating hormone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured with immunoassay while free testosterone levels were calculated. Total testosterone and LH were independently and positively associated in the cross-sectional analyses (p
PubMed ID
17298550 View in PubMed
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Neuropsychological function in relation to serum parathyroid hormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. The Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83111
Source
J Neurol. 2006 Apr;253(4):464-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Jorde Rolf
Waterloo Knut
Saleh Farahnaz
Haug Egil
Svartberg Johan
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
J Neurol. 2006 Apr;253(4):464-70
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Aged
Calcitriol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cognition - physiology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - blood - psychology
Male
Memory - physiology
Memory, Short-Term - physiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Verbal Behavior
Wechsler Scales
Word Association Tests
Abstract
There are receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the brain, and there are clinical and experimental data indicating that PTH and vitamin D may affect cerebral function. In the present study 21 subjects who both in the 5th Tromsø study and at a follow-up examination fulfilled criteria for secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) without renal failure (serum calcium 6.4 pmol/L, and normal serum creatinine) and 63 control subjects were compared with tests for cognitive and emotional function. Those in the SHPT group had significantly impaired performance in 3 of 14 cognitive tests (Digit span forward, Stroop test part 1 and 2, and Word association test (FAS)) as compared with the controls, and also had a significantly higher depression score at the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) (items 1-13). In a multiple linear regression model, a high serum PTH level was significantly associated with low performance at the Digit span forward, Stroop test part 1 and 2, and Digit Symbol tests. A low level of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly associated with a high depression score. In conclusion, a deranged calcium metabolism appears to be associated with impaired function in several tests of neuropsychological function.
PubMed ID
16283099 View in PubMed
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The relationship between serum TSH and bone mineral density in men and postmenopausal women: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91622
Source
Thyroid. 2008 Nov;18(11):1147-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Grimnes Guri
Emaus Nina
Joakimsen Ragnar Martin
Figenschau Yngve
Jorde Rolf
Author Affiliation
Medical Department B, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. guri.grimnes@unn.no
Source
Thyroid. 2008 Nov;18(11):1147-55
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Density - drug effects - physiology
Bone Remodeling - drug effects - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Norway
Osteoporosis - blood - etiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - blood - etiology
Thyroid Diseases - blood - complications - drug therapy
Thyroid Hormones - therapeutic use
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hyperthyroidism is associated with osteoporosis, and it has recently been suggested that thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) has bone protective properties. We wanted to explore the relationship between serum TSH and bone mineral density (BMD) in a healthy population. METHODS: This study included 993 postmenopausal females and 968 males with valid measurements of BMD at the hip and forearm in the fifth Tromsø study conducted in 2001. Participants with major diseases or medication affecting BMD or thyroid function were excluded. The subjects were divided into six different groups based on the 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles of serum TSH and the quartiles in between. Multiple linear regression adjusting for age; weight; height; smoking status; physical activity level; and for women, use of hormonal replacement therapy was used in the analyses. RESULTS: After multivariate adjustment, the 28 men and 18 women with serum TSH below the 2.5 percentile had significantly lower BMD at the ultradistal (women) and distal (both sexes) forearm than the 921 men and 950 women with serum TSH in the normal range. Also, the 25 postmenopausal women with serum TSH above the 97.5 percentile had significantly higher BMD at the femoral neck than women with serum TSH in the normal range. Across the normal range of serum TSH, there was no association between TSH and BMD, and serum TSH as a continuous variable had no effect on BMD in the multiple linear regression model. CONCLUSIONS: Within the normal range of serum TSH, serum TSH was not associated with BMD. The small groups of men and women with serum TSH consistent with hyperthyroidism had lower BMD at the forearm than those with serum TSH in the normal range.
PubMed ID
18925834 View in PubMed
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Serum levels of vitamin D and haemostatic factors in healthy subjects: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79596
Source
Acta Haematol. 2007;117(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jorde Rolf
Haug Egil
Figenschau Yngve
Hansen John-Bjarne
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
Acta Haematol. 2007;117(2):91-7
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antigens - blood
Calcitriol - blood
Factor VII
Factor VIIa - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Peptide Fragments - blood
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - blood
Prothrombin
Reference Values
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - blood
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Receptors for vitamin D have been found in various tissues, including the vascular endothelium. The role of vitamin D in the haemostatic process is uncertain, but in vitro studies may indicate a pro-fibrinolytic effect. METHODS: Two hundred and six subjects (105 males) were included in the study. The relations between indices of calcium metabolism and haemostatic factors [tissue plasminogen activator antigen (tPA Ag), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), prothrombin fragment 1+2, activated factor VII and total factor VII coagulant activity] and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP) were examined. RESULTS: There were significant and negative correlations between serum 25(OH) vitamin D and PAI-1 and tPA Ag, and between serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D and tPA Ag and HS-CRP. In a multiple linear regression model with age, gender, body mass index and smoking status as covariables, only the relation between 25(OH) vitamin D and tPA Ag was significant. There were no significant relations between any of the haemostatic factors tested and serum parathyroid hormone. CONCLUSION: It appears that the serum level of vitamin D is related to fibrinolytic activity and to the integrity of the vascular endothelium, but the clinical importance of this observation remains to be determined.
PubMed ID
17135721 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.