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Moving into a care home: the role of adult children in the placement process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31702
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2002 Mar;39(3):353-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Jonas Sandberg
Ulla Lundh
Mike Nolan
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Division of Geriatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, S-581-85, Linköping, Sweden. jonassandberg@mail.bip.net
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2002 Mar;39(3):353-62
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Caregivers
Decision Making
Family - psychology
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Admission of an older person to a care home is widely recognised as a very stressful period for the family and one which, despite community care policy, is likely to be an increasingly common experience. Although there is a growing research base in this area, there have been few studies on the role of adult children in supporting their parents during this difficult transition. This paper reports on the third stage of a grounded theory study conducted in Sweden which explored the part played by adult children in the placement process. Data were collected from 13 adult children using in-depth semi-structured interviews and the results are compared with themes previously derived from interviews with 26 spouse carers. The analysis reveals important overlaps and differences and suggests the need for further research exploring the dynamics of the placement process.
PubMed ID
11864658 View in PubMed
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Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290915
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Jul; 26(9):1252-62
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Cecilia Håkanson
Jonas Sandberg
Mirjam Ekstedt
Elisabeth Kenne Sarenmalm
Mats Christiansen
Joakim Öhlén
Author Affiliation
Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden cecilia.hakanson@esh.se.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Jul; 26(9):1252-62
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Communication
Homeless Persons
Humans
Palliative Care
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person's health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions.
PubMed ID
25994318 View in PubMed
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The Study of Active Monitoring in Sweden (SAMS): a randomized study comparing two different follow-up schedules for active surveillance of low-risk prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257241
Source
Scand J Urol. 2013 Oct;47(5):347-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Ola Bratt
Stefan Carlsson
Erik Holmberg
Lars Holmberg
Eva Johansson
Andreas Josefsson
Annika Nilsson
Maria Nyberg
David Robinsson
Jonas Sandberg
Dag Sandblom
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Helsingborg Hospital, Lund University , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Urol. 2013 Oct;47(5):347-55
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biopsy
Disease Management
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Watchful Waiting - methods
Abstract
Only a minority of patients with low-risk prostate cancer needs treatment, but the methods for optimal selection of patients for treatment are not established. This article describes the Study of Active Monitoring in Sweden (SAMS), which aims to improve those methods.
SAMS is a prospective, multicentre study of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer. It consists of a randomized part comparing standard rebiopsy and follow-up with an extensive initial rebiopsy coupled with less intensive follow-up and no further scheduled biopsies (SAMS-FU), as well as an observational part (SAMS-ObsQoL). Quality of life is assessed with questionnaires and compared with patients receiving primary curative treatment. SAMS-FU is planned to randomize 500 patients and SAMS-ObsQoL to include at least 500 patients during 5 years. The primary endpoint is conversion to active treatment. The secondary endpoints include symptoms, distant metastases and mortality. All patients will be followed for 10-15 years.
Inclusion started in October 2011. In March 2013, 148 patients were included at 13 Swedish urological centres.
It is hoped that the results of SAMS will contribute to fewer patients with indolent, low-risk prostate cancer receiving unnecessary treatment and more patients on active surveillance who need treatment receiving it when the disease is still curable. The less intensive investigational follow-up in the SAMS-FU trial would reduce the healthcare resources allocated to this large group of patients if it replaced the present standard schedule.
Notes
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Comment In: Scand J Urol. 2013 Oct;47(5):35624102230
Comment In: Scand J Urol. 2013 Oct;47(5):35724102231
PubMed ID
23883427 View in PubMed
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