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Aesthetic result after breast-conserving therapy is associated with quality of life several years after treatment. Swedish women evaluated with BCCT.core and BREAST-Q™.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289249
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Aug; 164(3):679-687
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Cecilia Dahlbäck
Jenny Heiman Ullmark
Martin Rehn
Anita Ringberg
Jonas Manjer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. cecilia.dahlback@med.lu.se.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Aug; 164(3):679-687
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - psychology - surgery
Female
Humans
Mastectomy, Segmental - methods
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A gold standard for evaluation of aesthetic outcome after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is still lacking. The BCCT.core software has been developed to assess aesthetic result in a standardised way. We aimed to study how the result of BCCT.core after BCT is associated with quality of life, measured with the BREAST-Q™, a validated questionnaire.
Women eligible for BCT were consecutively recruited between February 1st 2008 and January 31st 2012 (n = 653). Photographs of 310 women, taken one year after BCT, were evaluated using the BCCT.core software. The postoperative BCT module of the BREAST-Q™ questionnaire was administered by mail and 348 questionnaires were returned (median 5.5 years after BCT). In all, 216 women had both BCCT.core results and completed BREAST-Q™ questionnaires available.
The results from the BCCT.core evaluation were: excellent n = 49 (15.8%); good n = 178 (57.4%); fair n = 73 (23.5%); poor n = 10 (3.2%). The median BREAST-Q™ score for satisfaction with breasts was 66 [interquartile range (IQR) 57-80] and for psychosocial well-being 82 (IQR 61-100). Poor/fair results on BCCT.core were associated with Q-scores below median for both satisfaction with breasts [odds ratio (OR) 3.4 (confidence interval (CI) 1.7-6.8)] as well as for psychosocial well-being [OR 2.2 (CI 1.1-4.2)].
A statistically significant association between BCCT.core results one year after BCT and quality of life ratings using BREAST-Q™ several years later is shown in this study. This implies that the BCCT.core may be valuable in BCT follow-up and used as a standardised instrument in the evaluation of aesthetic results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28536951 View in PubMed
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Associations of hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives with risk of colorectal cancer defined by clinicopathological factors, beta-catenin alterations, expression of cyclin D1, p53, and microsatellite-instability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260824
Source
BMC Cancer. 2014;14:371
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jenny Brändstedt
Sakarias Wangefjord
Björn Nodin
Jakob Eberhard
Karin Jirström
Jonas Manjer
Source
BMC Cancer. 2014;14:371
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colorectal Neoplasms - chemistry - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Contraceptives, Oral, Hormonal - adverse effects
Cyclin D1 - analysis
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Microsatellite Instability
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Staging
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tissue Array Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - analysis
beta Catenin - analysis
Abstract
Postmenopausal hormone therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptive (OC) use have in several studies been reported to be associated with a decreased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, data on the association between HRT and OC and risk of different clinicopathological and molecular subsets of CRC are lacking. The aim of this molecular pathological epidemiology study was therefore to evaluate the associations between HRT and OC use and risk of specific CRC subgroups, overall and by tumour site.
In the population-based prospective cohort study Mamö Diet and Cancer, including 17035 women, 304 cases of CRC were diagnosed up until 31 December 2008. Immunohistochemical expression of beta-catenin, cyclin D1, p53 and MSI-screening status had previously been assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 280 cases. HRT was assessed as current use of combined HRT (CHRT) or unopposed oestrogen (ERT), and analysed among 12583 peri-and postmenopausal women. OC use was assessed as ever vs never use among all women in the cohort. A multivariate Cox regression model was applied to determine hazard ratios for risk of CRC, overall and according to molecular subgroups, in relation to HRT and OC use.
There was no significantly reduced risk of CRC by CHRT or ERT use, however a reduced risk of T-stage 1-2 tumours was seen among CHRT users (HR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.77).Analysis stratified by tumour location revealed a reduced overall risk of rectal, but not colon, cancer among CHRT and ERT users, including T stage 1-2, lymph node negative, distant metastasis-free, cyclin D1 - and p53 negative tumours.In unadjusted analysis, OC use was significantly associated with a reduced overall risk of CRC (HR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.44-0.71), but this significance was not retained in adjusted analysis (HR: 1.05: 95% CI: 0.80-1.37). A similar risk reduction was seen for the majority of clinicopathological and molecular subgroups.
Our findings provide information on the relationship between use of HRT and OC and risk of clinicopathological and molecular subsets of CRC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24885829 View in PubMed
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Blood glucose and risk of incident and fatal cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (me-can): analysis of six prospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98549
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Tanja Stocks
Kilian Rapp
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Hanno Ulmer
Randi Selmer
Annekatrin Lukanova
Dorthe Johansen
Hans Concin
Steinar Tretli
Göran Hallmans
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prospective studies have indicated that elevated blood glucose levels may be linked with increased cancer risk, but the strength of the association is unclear. We examined the association between blood glucose and cancer risk in a prospective study of six European cohorts. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can) includes cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden; the current study included 274,126 men and 275,818 women. Mean age at baseline was 44.8 years and mean follow-up time was 10.4 years. Excluding the first year of follow-up, 18,621 men and 11,664 women were diagnosed with cancer, and 6,973 men and 3,088 women died of cancer. We used Cox regression models to calculate relative risk (RR) for glucose levels, and included adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and smoking status in the analyses. RRs were corrected for regression dilution ratio of glucose. RR (95% confidence interval) per 1 mmol/l increment of glucose for overall incident cancer was 1.05 (1.01-1.10) in men and 1.11 (1.05-1.16) in women, and corresponding RRs for fatal cancer were 1.15 (1.07-1.22) and 1.21 (1.11-1.33), respectively. Significant increases in risk among men were found for incident and fatal cancer of the liver, gallbladder, and respiratory tract, for incident thyroid cancer and multiple myeloma, and for fatal rectal cancer. In women, significant associations were found for incident and fatal cancer of the pancreas, for incident urinary bladder cancer, and for fatal cancer of the uterine corpus, cervix uteri, and stomach. CONCLUSIONS: Data from our study indicate that abnormal glucose metabolism, independent of BMI, is associated with an increased risk of cancer overall and at several cancer sites. Our data showed stronger associations among women than among men, and for fatal cancer compared to incident cancer. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
PubMed ID
20027213 View in PubMed
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Blood lipid genetic scores, the HMGCR gene and cancer risk: a Mendelian randomization study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298643
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):495-505
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-01-2018
Author
Marju Orho-Melander
George Hindy
Signe Borgquist
Christina-Alexandra Schulz
Jonas Manjer
Olle Melander
Tanja Stocks
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):495-505
Date
04-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases - genetics
Logistic Models
Male
Mendelian Randomization Analysis
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
It is unclear whether there are causal associations between blood lipids, statin use and cancer risks. Under certain assumptions, Mendelian randomization analysis of a genetic marker for an exposure eliminates reverse causation and confounding.
We applied Mendelian randomization analysis to genetic scores, comprising 26-41 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as instrumental variables (IVs) for triglycerides and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC, HDLC), using a prospective cohort of 26?904 individuals in which there were 6607 incident cancers. We also investigated cancer risk for a SNP (rs12916) in the gene encoding hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the targeted enzyme in statin treatment. We used logistic regression and SNP pleiotropy-adjusted analyses to estimate the odds ratio per standard deviation (OR).
The OR for the triglyceride IV as a predictor of any cancer was 0.91 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.80-1.03] unadjusted, and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78-0.95) from the pleiotropy-adjusted analysis. For the HMGCR rs12916 per LDLC-lowering T-allele, the OR was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.18) for prostate cancer and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82-0.96) for breast cancer. The LDLC IV was not associated with prostate cancer or breast cancer. There were no associations between IVs and cancers of the lung, colon or bladder.
Under the assumptions of Mendelian randomization, there is a causal and negative association between serum triglycerides and risk of any cancer. Further, the HMGCR genetic variant might be associated with risks of prostate and breast cancers but the biological mechanisms behind these findings are unclear, as the LDLC IV was not associated with these cancers.
PubMed ID
29165714 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128682
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Michael Edlinger
Susanne Strohmaier
Håkan Jonsson
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Wegene T Borena
Christel Häggström
Anders Engeland
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Gabriele Nagel
Randi Selmer
Dorthe Johansen
Tanja Stocks
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Hanno Ulmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood pressure
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults.
In the Me-Can project, 580?000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error.
During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n?=?348) and high-grade glioma (n?=?436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio?=?1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio?=?1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio?=?1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP.
Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.
PubMed ID
22179083 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and risk of cancer incidence and mortality in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126806
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Tanja Stocks
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Jonas Manjer
Tone Bjørge
Hanno Ulmer
Göran Hallmans
Björn Lindkvist
Randi Selmer
Gabriele Nagel
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Anders Engeland
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Observational studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between blood pressure and cancer risk. We investigated the association in 7 cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden. In total, 577799 adults with a mean age of 44 years were followed for, on average, 12 years. Incident cancers were 22184 in men and 14744 in women, and cancer deaths were 8724 and 4525, respectively. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios of cancer per 10-mmHg increments of midblood pressure, which corresponded with 0.7 SDs and, for example, an increment of systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 130/80 to 142/88 mmHg. All of the models used age as the time scale and were adjusted for possible confounders, including body mass index and smoking status. In men, midblood pressure was positively related to total incident cancer (hazard ratio per 10 mmHg increment: 1.07 [95% CI: 1.04-1.09]) and to cancer of the oropharynx, colon, rectum, lung, bladder, kidney, malignant melanoma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. In women, midblood pressure was not related to total incident cancer but was positively related to cancer of the liver, pancreas, cervix, uterine corpus, and malignant melanoma. A positive association was also found for cancer mortality, with HRs per 10-mmHg increment of 1.12 (95% CI: 1.08-1.15) for men and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11) for women. These results suggest a small increased cancer risk overall in men with elevated blood pressure level and a higher risk for cancer death in men and women.
PubMed ID
22353615 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding in relation to risk of different breast cancer characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258898
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:216
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Salma Butt
Signe Borgquist
Lola Anagnostaki
Göran Landberg
Jonas Manjer
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:216
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Cyclin D1 - genetics
Female
Gene Expression
Humans
Ki-67 Antigen - genetics
Lymphatic Metastasis
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen - genetics
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Receptor, erbB-2 - genetics
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics
Abstract
The aim of this present study was to examine duration of breastfeeding in relation to the risk of different subgroups of breast cancer. A prospective cohort, The Malm? Diet and Cancer study, including 14092 parous women, were followed during a mean of 10.2?years and a total of 424 incident breast cancers were diagnosed.
Tumours were classified regarding invasiveness, tumour size, axillary lymph node status, Nottingham grade, tumour proliferation (Ki67), HER2, cyclin D1 and p27, WHO histological type and hormone receptor status. Duration of breastfeeding was measured using total time of breastfeeding, categorized in quartiles using the lowest as the reference group (
Notes
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PubMed ID
24708573 View in PubMed
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Clinical assessment of axillary lymph nodes and tumor size in breast cancer compared with histopathological examination: a population-based analysis of 2,537 women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120719
Source
World J Surg. 2013 Jan;37(1):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Shabaz Majid
Ingrid Tengrup
Jonas Manjer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. shabaz.majid@skane.se
Source
World J Surg. 2013 Jan;37(1):67-71
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Axilla
Breast Neoplasms - pathology
Female
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphatic Metastasis
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Tumor Burden
Abstract
The clinical assessment of axillary lymph nodes status and tumor size is important for the management of patients with breast cancer. The first goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of axillary lymph node status in relation to the presence of metastases as revealed by histopathological examination. The second goal was to compare the tumor size as assessed by physical examination, with the size obtained by histopathological examination.
This study was based on a consecutive series of 2,537 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in Malmö, Sweden, between 1987 and 2002. These patients had available information in the South Swedish Breast Cancer Group registry, corresponding to 97 %. The axillary lymph nodes status was compared with the results of the histopathological examination for the presence of metastases. Tumor size by physical examination was compared with the tumor size after histopathological examination.
There were 674 women with axillary lymph nodes metastases according to histological examination; only 206 of these cases had palpable lymph nodes at clinical examination. The sensitivity was 30 % and the specificity 93 %. There were 812 tumors measured to be larger than 20 mm according to histopathological examination, but only 665 of these tumors were considered larger than 20 mm by clinical examination. This corresponded to a sensitivity of 81 % and a specificity of 80 %.
We conclude that the possibility of axillary metastases estimated by clinical examination is subjected to a large proportion of false-positive and false-negative results. Similarly, tumor size estimated by clinical examination is subject to under- and overestimation in comparison to histopathological examination.
Notes
Comment In: World J Surg. 2013 Sep;37(9):2252-323604342
PubMed ID
22976793 View in PubMed
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Cohort Profile: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151439
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun;39(3):660-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Tanja Stocks
Wegene Borena
Susanne Strohmaier
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Anders Engeland
Dorthe Johansen
Randi Selmer
Göran Hallmans
Kilian Rapp
Hans Concin
Håkan Jonsson
Hanno Ulmer
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun;39(3):660-7
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Epidemiologic Research Design
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Program Development
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
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PubMed ID
19380371 View in PubMed
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Determinants of serum levels of vitamin D: a study of life-style, menopausal status, dietary intake, serum calcium, and PTH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108037
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2013;13:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Leila Shirazi
Martin Almquist
Johan Malm
Elisabet Wirfält
Jonas Manjer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Ystad Hospital, Ystad, Sweden. Leila.shirazi@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2013;13:33
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cohort Studies
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Menopause - blood
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Smoking - blood
Sweden
Abstract
Low blood levels of vitamin D (25-hydroxy D3, 25OHD3) in women have been associated with an increased risk of several diseases. A large part of the population may have suboptimal 25OHD3 levels but high-risk groups are not well known. The aim of the present study was to identify determinants for serum levels of 25OHD3 in women, i.e. factors such as lifestyle, menopausal status, diet and selected biochemical variables.
The study was based on women from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS), a prospective, population-based cohort study in Malmö, Sweden. In a previous case-control study on breast cancer, 25OHD3 concentrations had been measured in 727 women. In these, quartiles of serum 25OHD3 were compared with regard to age at baseline, BMI (Body Max Index), menopausal status, use of oral contraceptives or menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) , life-style (e.g. smoking and alcohol consumption), socio-demographic factors, season, biochemical variables (i.e. calcium, PTH, albumin, creatinine, and phosphate), and dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. In order to test differences in mean vitamin D concentrations between different categories of the studied factors, an ANOVA test was used followed by a t-test. The relation between different factors and 25OHD3 was further investigated using multiple linear regression analysis and a logistic regression analysis.
We found a positive association between serum levels of 25OHD3 and age, oral contraceptive use, moderate alcohol consumption, blood collection during summer/ autumn, creatinine, phosphate, calcium, and a high intake of vitamin D. Low vitamin D levels were associated with obesity, being born outside Sweden and high PTH levels.
The present population-based study found a positive association between serum levels of 25OHD3 and to several socio-demographic, life-style and biochemical factors. The study may have implications e. g. for dietary recommendations. However, the analysis is a cross-sectional and it is difficult to suggest Lifestyle changes as cause- effect relationships are difficult to assess.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23945218 View in PubMed
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