Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Effect of ageing on cervical or vaginal cancer in Swedish women previously treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3: population based cohort study of long term incidence and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105311
Source
BMJ. 2014;348:f7361
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Björn Strander
Jonas Hällgren
Pär Sparén
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 2014;348:f7361
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Vaginal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine factors influencing long term risks for acquiring or dying from invasive cervical or vaginal cancer in women previously treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3).
Population based cohort study conducted in 1958-2008, followed up until 2009 in the Swedish Cancer Registry and Swedish Cause of Death Register, linked to the Swedish Population Register. Standardised incidence and mortality ratios were calculated for the risk of acquiring or dying from vaginal or cervical cancer, with the general female population in Sweden as reference. Relative risks in multivariable regression models were also calculated, adjusting for follow-up duration, treatment period, and age at CIN3 treatment or attained age.
Entire female population of Sweden.
150,883 women in Sweden diagnosed and treated with CIN3 and followed up for invasive cervical or vaginal cancer, and related mortality. The cohort comprised 3,148,222 woman years.
Standardised incidence and mortality ratios, stratified by period for treatment. Relative standardised incidence ratios and standardised mortality ratios for age at acquiring or dying from cervical or vaginal cancer (attained age), adjusted for preset variables.
Women previously diagnosed with CIN3 had an increased risk of dying from invasive cervical or vaginal cancer, compared with the general female population (standardised mortality ratio 2.35, 95% confidence interval 2.11 to 2.61). After age 60 years, these women had an accelerated increased risk of acquiring invasive cancer; a similar steep increase in mortality risk was seen after age 70. Regression analyses indicated that the increase in risk over time is highly attributable to ageing.
Women previously treated for CIN3 are at increased risk of developing and dying from cervical or vaginal cancer, compared with the general female population. The risk accelerates above age 60 years, suggesting a need for lifelong surveillance of these women.
Notes
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Jul;201(1):33.e1-619345930
Cites: BJOG. 2009 May;116(6):838-4419432574
Cites: Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2008;42(4):352-718609293
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2009 Oct;45(15):2671-819695867
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2010 Jan 1;126(1):224-3119585576
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2011 May;12(5):441-5021530398
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2011 Sep 15;129(6):1450-821064110
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2012 May 15;130(10):2438-4421702034
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2012 Apr;48(6):845-5221658934
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Nov;120(5):1222-3823090560
Cites: BMJ. 2012;345:e708623117060
Cites: Acta Radiol Oncol. 1985 May-Jun;24(3):219-262994370
Cites: BJOG. 2002 May;109(5):579-8112066952
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2003 Jul 7;89(1):88-9312838306
Cites: Aging Cell. 2004 Aug;3(4):195-20815268753
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2004 Dec 20;112(6):1072-415386351
Cites: Acta Radiol Oncol. 1984;23(5):305-136095600
Cites: Radiother Oncol. 1989 Oct;16(2):115-202595011
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1990 Sep;1(2):143-82102284
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Apr 10;306(6883):967-718490472
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1996 Apr;73(8):1001-58611418
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 May;104(5):586-99166202
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1999 Oct;81(3):554-810507785
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2006 Apr 15;118(8):2048-5516284947
Cites: Gynecol Oncol. 2007 Apr;105(1):228-3317289128
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2007 Aug;43(12):1849-5517614272
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Nov 24;335(7629):107717959735
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Nov 24;335(7629):1053-417959736
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2008 May;9(5):425-3418407790
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2008 May 7;100(9):622-918445828
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a128418801868
Cites: Vaccine. 2008 Aug 19;26 Suppl 10:K29-4118847555
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2009;48(1):27-3318767000
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2009 Jan 21;101(2):88-9919141778
Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:f770024423750
PubMed ID
24423603 View in PubMed
Less detail

Excess mortality, causes of death and life expectancy in 270,770 patients with recent onset of mental disorders in Denmark, Finland and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116687
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e55176
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Kristian Wahlbeck
Jonas Hällgren
Jeanette Westman
Urban Osby
Hassan Alinaghizadeh
Mika Gissler
Thomas Munk Laursen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark. mn@dadlnet.dk
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e55176
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Excess mortality among patients with severe mental disorders has not previously been investigated in detail in large complete national populations.
To investigate the excess mortality in different diagnostic categories due to suicide and other external causes of death, and due to specific causes in connection with diseases and medical conditions.
In longitudinal national psychiatric case registers from Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, a cohort of 270,770 recent-onset patients, who at least once during the period 2000 to 2006 were admitted due to a psychiatric disorder, were followed until death or the end of 2006. They were followed for 912,279 person years, and 28,088 deaths were analyzed. Life expectancy and standardized cause-specific mortality rates were estimated in each diagnostic group in all three countries.
The life expectancy was generally approximately 15 years shorter for women and 20 years shorter for men, compared to the general population. Mortality due to diseases and medical conditions was increased two- to three-fold, while excess mortality from external causes ranged from three- to 77-fold. Mortality due to diseases and medical conditions was generally lowest in patients with affective disorders and highest in patients with substance abuse and personality disorders, while mortality due to suicide was highest in patients with affective disorders and personality disorders, and mortality due to other external causes was highest in patients with substance abuse.
These alarming figures call for action in order to prevent the high mortality.
Notes
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1998 Jan;172:35-79534829
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2002 Dec;72(3):227-3612450639
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Sep;46(4):354-710514943
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;62(3):247-5315753237
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;62(4):427-3215809410
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2005 Oct;193(10):641-616208158
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;187:552-816319408
Cites: Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2006 Jul-Aug;14(4):212-2216912007
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Mar 13;176(6):779-8417353530
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Jun;68(6):899-90717592915
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;68(7):e1717685728
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;182:31-612509315
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Jul 31;329(7460):26115213108
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1997 Dec;171:502-89519087
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Oct;42(10):787-9317721669
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;64(10):1123-3117909124
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2008 Oct;105(1-3):175-8718775645
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;44(2):135-4218663397
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;66(7):713-2019581562
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;24(6):412-2419682863
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;195(6):545-5019949207
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2010 Jan;36(1):48-7019955389
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;196(2):116-2120118455
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:6120219096
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2010 Jun;119(1-3):101-920219322
Cites: J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Nov;24(4 Suppl):61-820923921
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;64(6):372-620337568
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;55(12):752-6021172095
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 2011 Jan;45(1):29-3520546788
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2011 Mar;126(1-3):11-921183318
Cites: Med Care. 2011 Jun;49(6):599-60421577183
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2011 Jul 1;70(1):59-6321414605
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):54-721775352
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2011 Sep;131(1-3):101-421741216
Cites: BMJ. 2011;343:d542221914766
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;68(10):1058-6421969462
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;199(6):453-821593516
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Jun;47(6):843-721559973
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 May;101(5):382-810823298
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2000 Jul-Aug;22(4):224-3510936629
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2000 Sep 29;45(1-2):21-810978869
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;35(8):341-711037302
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;177:212-711040880
Cites: Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Jan 1;115(1-2):15-3211056267
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2001 Mar 1;47(2-3):127-3411278129
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;58(9):844-5011545667
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Dec;179:498-50211731351
Cites: Psychol Med. 1999 May;29(3):697-70110405091
PubMed ID
23372832 View in PubMed
Less detail

Life expectancy and death by diseases of the circulatory system in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112484
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e67133
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Thomas Munk Laursen
Kristian Wahlbeck
Jonas Hällgren
Jeanette Westman
Urban Ösby
Hassan Alinaghizadeh
Mika Gissler
Merete Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Register-based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. tml@ncrr.dk
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e67133
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cardiovascular System - pathology
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - mortality
Abstract
Excess mortality from diseases and medical conditions (natural death) in persons with psychiatric disorders has been extensively reported. Even in the Nordic countries with well-developed welfare systems, register based studies find evidence of an excess mortality. In recent years, cardiac mortality and death by diseases of the circulatory system has seen a decline in all the Nordic countries, but a recent paper indicates that women and men in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, who had been hospitalised for a psychotic disorder, had a two to three-fold increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality by diseases of the circulatory system among patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the three Nordic countries Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Furthermore, the aim was to examine and compare life expectancy among these patients. Cause specific Standardized Mortality Rates (SMRs) were calculated for each specific subgroup of mortality. Life expectancy was calculated using Wiesler's method.
The SMR for bipolar disorder for diseases of the circulatory system was approximately 2 in all countries and both sexes. SMR was slightly higher for people with schizophrenia for both genders and in all countries, except for men in Denmark. Overall life expectancy was much lower among persons with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, with life expectancy being from 11 to 20 years shorter.
Our data show that persons in the Nordic countries with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a substantially reduced life expectancy. An evaluation of the reasons for these increased mortality rates should be prioritized when planning healthcare in the coming years.
Notes
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;58(9):844-5011545667
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Dec;179:498-50211731351
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):54-721775352
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2011 Sep;131(1-3):101-421741216
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;199(6):453-821593516
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;199(6):441-222130744
Cites: Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2012 Mar;25(2):83-822249081
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2012 Aug;22(4):604-621659387
Cites: Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2012 Sep;16(3):170-722432978
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e5517623372832
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Jun;29(3):495-50210869322
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2000 Sep 29;45(1-2):21-810978869
Cites: Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Jan 1;115(1-2):15-3211056267
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2002 Sep 1;57(1):5-1312165371
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1993 Aug;163:183-98075909
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1998 Jul;173:11-539850203
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Sep;46(4):354-710514943
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2005 Feb 14;92(3):426-915668706
Cites: Am Heart J. 2005 Dec;150(6):1115-2116338246
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Jun;68(6):899-90717592915
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Mar 28;373(9669):1083-9619299006
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;66(7):713-2019581562
Cites: Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2009 Dec;11(6):475-8019909670
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2010 Aug;19(6):781-720349211
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2010 Aug;121(1-3):234-4020570491
Cites: Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;23(6):574-8120838345
Cites: J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Nov;24(4 Suppl):9-1520923916
Cites: J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Nov;24(4 Suppl):17-2520923917
Cites: J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Nov;24(4 Suppl):37-5020923919
Cites: J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Nov;24(4 Suppl):69-8020923922
Cites: J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Nov;24(4 Suppl):91-11820923924
Cites: Indian J Med Res. 2010 Oct;132:353-520966510
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;55(12):752-6021172095
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 2011 Jan;45(1):29-3520546788
Cites: Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;23(1):40-721318195
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(5):e1959021611123
PubMed ID
23826212 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lithium treatment and cancer incidence in bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276523
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2016 Feb;18(1):33-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Lina Martinsson
Jeanette Westman
Jonas Hällgren
Urban Ösby
Lena Backlund
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2016 Feb;18(1):33-40
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antimanic Agents - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Endocrine Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Lithium Compounds - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Protective factors
Registries
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cancer associated with lithium treatment in patients with bipolar disorder compared to the general population.
A nationwide Swedish register study of incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of total cancer and site-specific cancer in the 50-84-year age range was carried out in patients with bipolar disorder (n = 5,442) with and without lithium treatment from July 2005 to December 2009 compared to the general population using linked information from The Swedish Cancer Register, The National Patient Register, and The Drug Prescription Register.
The overall cancer risk was not increased in patients with bipolar disorder. There was no difference in risk of unspecified cancer, neither in patients with lithium treatment compared to the general population [IRR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89-1.23] nor in patients with bipolar disorder without lithium treatment compared to the general population (IRR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.89-1.19). The cancer risk was significantly increased in patients with bipolar disorder without lithium treatment in the digestive organs (IRR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.12-1.93), in the respiratory system and intrathoracic organs (IRR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.11-2.66), and in the endocrine glands and related structures (IRR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.24-5.47), but in patients with bipolar disorder with lithium treatment, there was no significantly increased cancer risk compared to the general population.
Bipolar disorder was not associated with increased cancer incidence and neither was lithium treatment in these patients. Specifically, there was an increased risk of respiratory, gastrointestinal, and endocrine cancer in patients with bipolar disorder without lithium treatment.
PubMed ID
26880208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mortality trends in external causes of death in people with mental health disorders in Sweden, 1987-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299203
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):121-126
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Jonas Hällgren
Urban Ösby
Jeanette Westman
Mika Gissler
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):121-126
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated mortality from external causes in Swedish people who had been hospitalised with a severe mental disorder.
Hospitalisations in people aged 15 years or older admitted to hospital with a main diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder or unipolar mood disorder between 1987 and 2010 were linked to their causes of death.
The mortality rate from all external causes was 20-fold higher in those with unipolar mood disorder, 15-fold higher in those with bipolar disorder and 12-fold higher in those with schizophrenia than in the general population. Over the study periods, the mortality rate declined more for people with unipolar mood disorder (-35%) and schizophrenia (-29%) than the total population (-25%) and those with bipolar mood disorder (-15%). The suicide rate declined most for those with unipolar mood disorder and schizophrenia (-42% for both) and less for the general population (-37%) and those with bipolar mood disorder (-21%). For external causes other than suicide, the mortality rate declined in the general population (-17%) but increased in people with schizophrenia (14%), bipolar mood disorder (30%) and unipolar mood disorder (52%).
People with mental disorders have high but declining excess mortality from suicide. Mortality from other external causes has increased, as has the gap in mortality rates between psychiatric patients and the general population.
PubMed ID
29493432 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of presentation to hospital with epileptic seizures after vaccination with monovalent AS03 adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine (Pandemrix): self controlled case series study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117667
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e7594
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström
Jonas Hällgren
Caroline E Weibull
Pär Sparén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels väg 12A, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e7594
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Mass Vaccination - methods - statistics & numerical data
Pandemics - prevention & control
Registries
Risk assessment
Seizures - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess the risk of epileptic seizures in people with and without epilepsy after vaccination with a monovalent AS03 adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 influenza vaccine (Pandemrix; Glaxo SmithKline, Sweden).
Register based self controlled case series.
Three Swedish counties (source population 750,000).
373,398 people (age 0-106, median 41.2) who were vaccinated. Vaccinated people with epileptic seizures, diagnosed as inpatients or outpatients, at any time from 90 days before until 90 days after any dose of vaccine.
Endpoints were admission to hospital or outpatient hospital care with epileptic seizures as the main diagnosis. The effect estimate of relative incidence was calculated as the incidence of epileptic seizures in period after exposure relative to the incidence of epileptic seizures in two control periods, one before and one after vaccination.
859 people experienced epileptic seizures during the study period. There was no increased risk of seizures in people with previously diagnosed epilepsy (relative incidence 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.74 to 1.39) and a non-significant decrease in risk for people without epilepsy (0.67, 0.27 to 1.65) during the day 1-7 risk period (where day 1 is the day of vaccination). In a second risk period (day 8-30), there was a non-significant increased risk of seizures in people without epilepsy (1.11, 0.73 to 1.70) but no increase in risk for those with epilepsy (1.00, 0.83 to 1.21).
This study found no evidence of an increase in risk of presentation to hospital with epileptic seizures after vaccination with a monovalent AS03 adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine.
Notes
Cites: J Neurol. 2000 Jan;247(1):15-2110701892
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(3):e3353622470453
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Nov 7;347(19):1477-8212421889
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1974 Jan;49(1):46-94818092
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Aug;110(2):105-23463869
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Feb;131(2):373-52296988
Cites: Epilepsia. 1993 Jul-Aug;34(4):592-68330566
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jan 5;271(1):37-417903109
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Jun 1;143(11):1165-738633607
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Dec 17;339(25):1797-8029854114
Cites: Stat Med. 2006 May 30;25(10):1768-9716220518
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Nov 13;166(20):2217-2117101939
Cites: Curr Opin Neurol. 2007 Apr;20(2):181-717351489
Cites: Epilepsy Res. 2007 Jul;75(2-3):162-7017624737
Cites: Epilepsia. 2008 Feb;49(2):219-2518093146
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(11):659-6719504049
Cites: Drug Saf. 2010 Dec 1;33(12):1097-10821077700
Cites: Int Marit Health. 2010;62(4):246-5021348019
Cites: Vaccine. 2011 Mar 21;29(14):2576-8121296693
Cites: BMJ. 2011;343:d390821750072
Cites: Vaccine. 2011 Aug 26;29(37):6369-7021840464
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:29122029484
Cites: Vaccine. 2011 Nov 28;29(51):9467-7222019757
Cites: Vaccine. 2012 Mar 2;30(11):2020-322361303
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Feb 24;322(7284):460-311222420
PubMed ID
23274350 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.