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Climate change opens new frontiers for marine species in the Arctic: Current trends and future invasion risks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298566
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2019 01; 25(1):25-38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
01-2019
Author
Farrah T Chan
Keara Stanislawczyk
Anna C Sneekes
Alexander Dvoretsky
Stephan Gollasch
Dan Minchin
Matej David
Anders Jelmert
Jon Albretsen
Sarah A Bailey
Author Affiliation
Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2019 01; 25(1):25-38
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms - physiology
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Climate change
Ecosystem
Introduced Species - statistics & numerical data - trends
Risk
Abstract
Climate change and increased anthropogenic activities are expected to elevate the potential of introducing nonindigenous species (NIS) into the Arctic. Yet, the knowledge base needed to identify gaps and priorities for NIS research and management is limited. Here, we reviewed primary introduction events to each ecoregion of the marine Arctic realm to identify temporal and spatial patterns, likely source regions of NIS, and the putative introduction pathways. We included 54 introduction events representing 34 unique NIS. The rate of NIS discovery ranged from zero to four species per year between 1960 and 2015. The Iceland Shelf had the greatest number of introduction events (n = 14), followed by the Barents Sea (n = 11), and the Norwegian Sea (n = 11). Sixteen of the 54 introduction records had no known origins. The majority of those with known source regions were attributed to the Northeast Atlantic and the Northwest Pacific, 19 and 14 records, respectively. Some introduction events were attributed to multiple possible pathways. For these introductions, vessels transferred the greatest number of aquatic NIS (39%) to the Arctic, followed by natural spread (30%) and aquaculture activities (25%). Similar trends were found for introductions attributed to a single pathway. The phyla Arthropoda and Ochrophyta had the highest number of recorded introduction events, with 19 and 12 records, respectively. Recommendations including vector management, horizon scanning, early detection, rapid response, and a pan-Arctic biodiversity inventory are considered in this paper. Our study provides a comprehensive record of primary introductions of NIS for marine environments in the circumpolar Arctic and identifies knowledge gaps and opportunities for NIS research and management. Ecosystems worldwide will face dramatic changes in the coming decades due to global change. Our findings contribute to the knowledge base needed to address two aspects of global change-invasive species and climate change.
PubMed ID
30295388 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change opens new frontiers for marine species in the Arctic: Current trends and future invasion risks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295370
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 Oct 08; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Oct-08-2018
Author
Farrah T Chan
Keara Stanislawczyk
Anna C Sneekes
Alexander Dvoretsky
Stephan Gollasch
Dan Minchin
Matej David
Anders Jelmert
Jon Albretsen
Sarah A Bailey
Author Affiliation
Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 Oct 08; :
Date
Oct-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
Climate change and increased anthropogenic activities are expected to elevate the potential of introducing nonindigenous species (NIS) into the Arctic. Yet, the knowledge base needed to identify gaps and priorities for NIS research and management is limited. Here, we reviewed primary introduction events to each ecoregion of the marine Arctic realm to identify temporal and spatial patterns, likely source regions of NIS, and the putative introduction pathways. We included 54 introduction events representing 34 unique NIS. The rate of NIS discovery ranged from zero to four species per year between 1960 and 2015. The Iceland Shelf had the greatest number of introduction events (n = 14), followed by the Barents Sea (n = 11), and the Norwegian Sea (n = 11). Sixteen of the 54 introduction records had no known origins. The majority of those with known source regions were attributed to the Northeast Atlantic and the Northwest Pacific, 19 and 14 records, respectively. Some introduction events were attributed to multiple possible pathways. For these introductions, vessels transferred the greatest number of aquatic NIS (39%) to the Arctic, followed by natural spread (30%) and aquaculture activities (25%). Similar trends were found for introductions attributed to a single pathway. The phyla Arthropoda and Ochrophyta had the highest number of recorded introduction events, with 19 and 12 records, respectively. Recommendations including vector management, horizon scanning, early detection, rapid response, and a pan-Arctic biodiversity inventory are considered in this paper. Our study provides a comprehensive record of primary introductions of NIS for marine environments in the circumpolar Arctic and identifies knowledge gaps and opportunities for NIS research and management. Ecosystems worldwide will face dramatic changes in the coming decades due to global change. Our findings contribute to the knowledge base needed to address two aspects of global change-invasive species and climate change.
PubMed ID
30295388 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a national operational salmon lice monitoring system-From physics to fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294146
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0201338
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Mari Skuggedal Myksvoll
Anne Dagrun Sandvik
Jon Albretsen
Lars Asplin
Ingrid Askeland Johnsen
Ørjan Karlsen
Nils Melsom Kristensen
Arne Melsom
Jofrid Skardhamar
Bjørn Ådlandsvik
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0201338
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The Norwegian government has decided that the aquaculture industry shall grow, provided that the growth is environmentally sustainable. Sustainability is scored based on the mortality of wild salmonids caused by the parasitic salmon lice. Salmon lice infestation pressure has traditionally been monitored through catching wild sea trout and Arctic char using nets or traps or by trawling after Atlantic salmon postsmolts. However, due to that the Norwegian mainland coastline is nearly 25 000 km, complementary methods that may be used in order to give complete results are needed. We have therefore developed an operational salmon lice model, which calculates the infestation pressure all along the coast in near real-time based on a hydrodynamical ocean model and a salmon lice particle tracking model. The hydrodynamic model generally shows a negative temperature bias and a positive salinity bias compared to observations. The modeled salmon lice dispersion correlates with measured lice on wild salmonids caught using traps or nets. This allows for using two complementary data sources in order to determine the infestation pressure of lice originating from fish farms on wild salmonids, and thereby provide an improved monitoring system for assessing risk and sustainability which forms the basis for knowledge-based advice to management authorities.
Notes
Cites: Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Aug 30;71(3):201-12 PMID 17058601
Cites: J Fish Dis. 2009 Jan;32(1):27-44 PMID 19245629
Cites: J Fish Dis. 2013 Mar;36(3):323-37 PMID 23305449
Cites: Prev Vet Med. 2016 Jul 1;129:48-57 PMID 27317322
Cites: J Fish Dis. 2016 Apr;39(4):419-28 PMID 25929159
Cites: J Exp Biol. 2000 Jun;203(Pt 11):1649-57 PMID 10804155
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Jun 22;279(1737):2330-8 PMID 22319130
Cites: J Parasitol. 1997 Aug;83(4):575-83 PMID 9267395
Cites: Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Jan;20(1):61-75 PMID 23966281
Cites: Epidemics. 2018 Jun;23:19-33 PMID 29233546
PubMed ID
30063759 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a national operational salmon lice monitoring system-From physics to fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297586
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0201338
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Mari Skuggedal Myksvoll
Anne Dagrun Sandvik
Jon Albretsen
Lars Asplin
Ingrid Askeland Johnsen
Ørjan Karlsen
Nils Melsom Kristensen
Arne Melsom
Jofrid Skardhamar
Bjørn Ådlandsvik
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0201338
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Copepoda
Epidemiological Monitoring
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - prevention & control - transmission
Models, Biological
Norway
Salmo salar - parasitology
Abstract
The Norwegian government has decided that the aquaculture industry shall grow, provided that the growth is environmentally sustainable. Sustainability is scored based on the mortality of wild salmonids caused by the parasitic salmon lice. Salmon lice infestation pressure has traditionally been monitored through catching wild sea trout and Arctic char using nets or traps or by trawling after Atlantic salmon postsmolts. However, due to that the Norwegian mainland coastline is nearly 25 000 km, complementary methods that may be used in order to give complete results are needed. We have therefore developed an operational salmon lice model, which calculates the infestation pressure all along the coast in near real-time based on a hydrodynamical ocean model and a salmon lice particle tracking model. The hydrodynamic model generally shows a negative temperature bias and a positive salinity bias compared to observations. The modeled salmon lice dispersion correlates with measured lice on wild salmonids caught using traps or nets. This allows for using two complementary data sources in order to determine the infestation pressure of lice originating from fish farms on wild salmonids, and thereby provide an improved monitoring system for assessing risk and sustainability which forms the basis for knowledge-based advice to management authorities.
Notes
ErratumIn: PLoS One. 2018 Dec 26;13(12):e0209949 PMID 30586423
PubMed ID
30063759 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predicting the effectiveness of depth-based technologies to prevent salmon lice infection using a dispersal model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282133
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2016 Jul 01;129:48-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2016
Author
Francisca Samsing
Ingrid Johnsen
Lars Helge Stien
Frode Oppedal
Jon Albretsen
Lars Asplin
Tim Dempster
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2016 Jul 01;129:48-57
Date
Jul-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquaculture
Arguloida - physiology
Computer simulation
Disease Models, Animal
Fish Diseases - parasitology
Fisheries
Lice Infestations - prevention & control - veterinary
Linear Models
Models, Biological
Norway
Salmon - parasitology
Abstract
Salmon lice is one of the major parasitic problems affecting wild and farmed salmonid species. The planktonic larval stages of these marine parasites can survive for extended periods without a host and are transported long distances by water masses. Salmon lice larvae have limited swimming capacity, but can influence their horizontal transport by vertical positioning. Here, we adapted a coupled biological-physical model to calculate the distribution of farm-produced salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) during winter in the southwest coast of Norway. We tested 4 model simulations to see which best represented empirical data from two sources: (1) observed lice infection levels reported by farms; and (2) experimental data from a vertical exposure experiment where fish were forced to swim at different depths with a lice-barrier technology. Model simulations tested were different development time to the infective stage (35 or 50°-days), with or without the presence of temperature-controlled vertical behaviour of lice early planktonic stages (naupliar stages). The best model fit occurred with a 35°-day development time to the infective stage, and temperature-controlled vertical behaviour. We applied this model to predict the effectiveness of depth-based preventive lice-barrier technologies. Both simulated and experimental data revealed that hindering fish from swimming close to the surface efficiently reduced lice infection. Moreover, while our model simulation predicted that this preventive technology is widely applicable, its effectiveness will depend on environmental conditions. Low salinity surface waters reduce the effectiveness of this technology because salmon lice avoid these conditions, and can encounter the fish as they sink deeper in the water column. Correctly parameterized and validated salmon lice dispersal models can predict the impact of preventive approaches to control this parasite and become an essential tool in lice management strategies.
PubMed ID
27317322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Summer mortalities and detection of ostreid herpesvirus microvariant in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in Sweden and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271959
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2016 Jan 13;117(3):171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-2016
Author
Stein Mortensen
Åsa Strand
Torjan Bodvin
Anders Alfjorden
Cecilie K Skår
Anders Jelmert
Anna Aspán
Lisbeth Sælemyr
Lars-Johan Naustvoll
Jon Albretsen
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2016 Jan 13;117(3):171-6
Date
Jan-13-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Crassostrea - virology
DNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Genetic Variation
Herpesviridae - genetics - physiology
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has recently expanded its range in Scandinavia. The expansion is presumably a result of northwards larval drift. Massive settlements were recorded in many areas along the Swedish west coast and southern Norway in 2013 and 2014. After the spawning season in 2014, the temperature of the surface water peaked at 24-26°C. After this period, high and sudden mortalities occurred in a Swedish hatchery and in wild populations along the Swedish west coast and south coast of Norway. Surveys and collected data showed that mortalities mainly occurred during 3 wk in September. All size classes were affected, and affected populations displayed a patchy distribution with heavily affected and unaffected populations in close proximity. Flat oysters Ostrea edulis and blue mussels Mytilus edulis were unaffected. Ostreid herpesvirus (OsHV) was detected in moribund Pacific oyster spat as well as in surviving adults. The virus was identified as OsHV-1 µvar. This is the first detection of this variant in Scandinavia, showing that OsHV-1 µvar is present in areas with recent establishments of Pacific oysters, and where there is no aquaculture of this species.
PubMed ID
26758650 View in PubMed
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Temperature-associated habitat selection in a cold-water marine fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280875
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2016 05;85(3):628-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
05-2016
Author
Carla Freitas
Esben M Olsen
Halvor Knutsen
Jon Albretsen
Even Moland
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2016 05;85(3):628-37
Date
05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Gadus morhua - physiology
Norway
Oceans and Seas
Temperature
Abstract
Habitat selection is a complex process, which involves behavioural decisions guided by the multiple needs and constraints faced by individuals. Climate-induced changes in environmental conditions may alter those trade-offs and resulting habitat use patterns. In this study, we investigated the effect of sea temperature on habitat selection and habitat use of acoustically tagged Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. Significant relationships between ocean temperature and habitat selection and use were found. Under favourable sea temperature thresholds (
PubMed ID
26476092 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.