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Allergic disease and atopic sensitization in children in relation to measles vaccination and measles infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89798
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Rosenlund Helen
Bergström Anna
Alm Johan S
Swartz Jackie
Scheynius Annika
van Hage Marianne
Johansen Kari
Brunekreef Bert
von Mutius Erika
Ege Markus J
Riedler Josef
Braun-Fahrländer Charlotte
Waser Marco
Pershagen Göran
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. helen.rosenlund@ki.se
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthroposophy
Child
Child, Preschool
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Europe
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Life Style
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS: A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in Children Related to Farming and Anthroposophic Lifestyle study, conducted in 5 European countries (Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland). The children were between 5 and 13 years of age and represented farm children, Steiner-school children, and 2 reference groups. Children attending Steiner schools often have an anthroposophic (holistic) lifestyle in which some immunizations are avoided or postponed. Parental questionnaires provided information on exposure and lifestyle factors as well as symptoms and diagnoses in the children. A sample of the children was invited for additional tests, and 4049 children provided a blood sample for immunoglobulin E analyses. Only children with complete information on measles vaccination and infection were included in the analyses (84%). RESULTS: In the whole group of children, atopic sensitization was inversely associated with measles infection, and a similar tendency was seen for measles vaccination. To reduce risks of disease-related modification of exposure, children who reported symptoms of wheezing and/or eczema debuting during first year of life were excluded from some analyses. After this exclusion, inverse associations were observed between measles infection and "any allergic symptom" and "any diagnosis of allergy by a physician." However, no associations were found between measles vaccination and allergic disease. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that measles infection may protect against allergic disease in children.
PubMed ID
19255001 View in PubMed
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Complications attributable to rotavirus-induced diarrhoea in a Swedish paediatric population: report from an 11-year surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92128
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(11-12):958-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Johansen Kari
Hedlund Kjell-Olof
Zweygberg-Wirgart Benita
Bennet Rutger
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden. kari.johansen@smi.ki.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(11-12):958-64
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Rotavirus Infections - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective observational study was to evaluate age, length of hospital stay and development of complications in children hospitalized with community- or nosocomially- acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis (RV GE). In total, medical records of 984 children with RV GE were analysed retrospectively. The median age was 13.8 months (3 weeks to 99 months) in children with community acquired RV GE (n=723) and 9.0 months (range 3 weeks to 82 months) in children with nosocomially acquired RV GE (n=261). During this 11-y surveillance, only 2 children were admitted twice for a RV GE, suggesting development of subsequent protective immunity against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis after the first episode. Complications occurred in 16.5% of the children with community acquired RV GE and only in 1.9% of the nosocomially acquired RV GE. Identified complications in children with community acquired RV GE were: severe dehydration resulting in intensive care (1.7%), death (0.1%), hypertonic dehydration (9.1%), seizures (4.0%) and encephalitis with abnormal EEG (1.7%). The median age of children in need of intensive care was 9.1 months and in those developing hypertonic dehydration 10.8 months, both significantly lower than in children with no complications (p
PubMed ID
18777248 View in PubMed
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Norovirus strains belonging to the GII.4 genotype dominate as a cause of nosocomial outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis in Sweden 1997--2005. Arrival of new variants is associated with large nation-wide epidemics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93550
Source
J Clin Virol. 2008 Jun;42(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Johansen Kari
Mannerqvist Kerstin
Allard Annika
Andersson Yvonne
Burman Lars G
Dillner Lena
Hedlund Kjell-Olof
Jönsson Klas
Kumlin Urban
Leitner Thomas
Lysén Maria
Thorhagen Margareta
Tiveljung-Lindell Annika
Wahlström Cecilia
Zweygberg-Wirgart Benita
Widell Anders
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Immunology and Vaccinology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, 171 82 Solna, Sweden. kari.johansen@smi.ki.se
Source
J Clin Virol. 2008 Jun;42(2):129-34
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Cross Infection - epidemiology - virology
Disease Outbreaks
Epidemiology, Molecular
Feces - virology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - virology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Norovirus - classification - genetics
Phylogeny
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In recent years an increase of the incidence of nosocomial outbreaks caused by noroviruses has been observed throughout Sweden, with high peaks noted in the winter seasons 2002/2003 and 2004/2005, respectively. OBJECTIVES: To phylogenetically characterize norovirus strains causing nosocomial outbreaks from 1997 to 2005 and estimate the impact of norovirus-like disease on the Swedish health care system during the peak season 2002/2003 when a new variant of norovirus occurred. STUDY DESIGN: Stool samples from 115 randomly selected nosocomial outbreaks occurring during 1997--2005 throughout Sweden were studied by RT-PCR and sequencing. In addition, to investigate the impact on the health-care system, a questionnaire was distributed to infection control units (n=90) serving all Swedish hospitals, nursing homes and other health-care institutions during the largest epidemic of nosocomial outbreaks. RESULTS: Sequencing of 279 nucleotides of the norovirus RNA polymerase gene in stools containing norovirus RNA showed that strains belonging to the GII.4 genotype dominated. Each of the two large epidemics was due to a new variant within this cluster. The questionnaire revealed that 30,000-35,000 episodes of nosocomial norovirus-like infections occurred in 80 of 82 major Swedish hospitals affected in 2002/2003. CONCLUSION: New norovirus variants within the cluster GGII.4 may have a major impact on the health-care system.
PubMed ID
18304864 View in PubMed
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Towards elimination: measles susceptibility in Australia and 17 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86508
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2008 Mar;86(3):197-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Andrews Nick
Tischer Annedore
Siedler Annette
Pebody Richard G
Barbara Christopher
Cotter Suzanne
Duks Arnis
Gacheva Nina
Bohumir Kriz
Johansen Kari
Mossong Joel
Ory Fernando de
Prosenc Katarina
Sláciková Margareta
Theeten Heidi
Zarvou Marios
Pistol Adriana
Bartha Kalman
Cohen Dani
Backhouse Jo
Griskevicius Algirdas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Infections, Health Protection Agency, London, England. nick.andrews@hpa.org.uk
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2008 Mar;86(3):197-204
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Australia - epidemiology
Blood Banks
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Measles - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - immunology - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Vaccines, Attenuated
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate age-specific measles susceptibility in Australia and 17 European countries. METHODS: As part of the European Sero-Epidemiology Network 2 (ESEN2), 18 countries collected large national serum banks between 1996 and 2004. These banks were tested for measles IgG and the results converted to a common unitage to enable valid intercountry comparisons. Historical vaccination and disease incidence data were also collected. Age-stratified population susceptibility levels were compared to WHO European Region targets for measles elimination of
PubMed ID
18368206 View in PubMed
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