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Common variants in human CRC genes as low-risk alleles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98081
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Simone Picelli
Pawel Zajac
Xiao-Lei Zhou
David Edler
Claes Lenander
Johan Dalén
Fredrik Hjern
Nils Lundqvist
Ulrik Lindforss
Lars Påhlman
Kennet Smedh
Anders Törnqvist
Jörn Holm
Martin Janson
Magnus Andersson
Susanne Ekelund
Louise Olsson
Joakim Lundeberg
Annika Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penetrance
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) has been estimated to be around 35% and yet high-penetrance germline mutations found so far explain less than 5% of all cases. Much of the remaining variations could be due to the co-inheritance of multiple low penetrant variants. The identification of all the susceptibility alleles could have public health relevance in the near future. To test the hypothesis that what are considered polymorphisms in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles, we selected eight common SNPs for a pilot association study in 1785 cases and 1722 controls. One SNP, rs3219489:G>C (MUTYH Q324H) seemed to confer an increased risk of rectal cancer in homozygous status (OR=1.52; CI=1.06-2.17). When the analysis was restricted to our 'super-controls', healthy individuals with no family history for cancer, also rs1799977:A>G (MLH1 I219V) was associated with an increased risk in both colon and rectum patients with an odds ratio of 1.28 (CI=1.02-1.60) and 1.34 (CI=1.05-1.72), respectively (under the dominant model); while 2 SNPs, rs1800932:A>G (MSH6 P92P) and rs459552:T>A (APC D1822V) seemed to confer a protective effect. The latter, in particular showed an odds ratio of 0.76 (CI=0.60-0.97) among colon patients and 0.73 (CI=0.56-0.95) among rectal patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that common variants in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles.
PubMed ID
20149637 View in PubMed
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Increased cause-specific mortality in patients with mild and severe psoriasis: a population-based Swedish register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275097
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2015 Sep;95(7):809-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Axel Svedbom
Johan Dalén
Carla Mamolo
Joseph C Cappelleri
Lotus Mallbris
Ingemar F Petersson
Mona Ståhle
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2015 Sep;95(7):809-15
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Psoriasis - diagnosis - mortality
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Several studies have shown excess risk for a number of comorbidities in patients with psoriasis compared with the general population, but data on cause-specific mortality in this patient population are limited. The aim of this study was to estimate the associations of psoriasis and 12 specific causes of death and all-cause mortality in patients with mild and severe psoriasis. The study was based on data from Swedish administrative registers and compared the risk of death in 39,074 patients with psoriasis with 154,775 sex-, age- and residency-matched referents using Cox proportional hazards models. In patients with mild and severe psoriasis, the strongest associations were observed for deaths due to kidney disease (hazard ratio [HR]=2.20, p?
PubMed ID
25766866 View in PubMed
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Treatment persistence among patients with immune-mediated rheumatic disease newly treated with subcutaneous TNF-alpha inhibitors and costs associated with non-persistence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281038
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2016 Jul;36(7):987-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Johan Dalén
Axel Svedbom
Christopher M Black
Ramon Lyu
Qian Ding
Shiva Sajjan
Vasilisa Sazonov
Sumesh Kachroo
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2016 Jul;36(7):987-95
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adalimumab - administration & dosage - economics
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - economics
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - economics
Biological Products - administration & dosage - adverse effects - economics
Certolizumab Pegol - administration & dosage - economics
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Costs
Drug Prescriptions
Etanercept - administration & dosage - economics
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - economics - immunology
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors - immunology
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to describe real-world treatment persistence with subcutaneous tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors (SC-TNFi) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis [collectively immune-mediated rheumatic disease, (IMRD)] in Sweden. A secondary objective was to describe potential effects on health care resource utilization (HCRU) cost from non-persistence. Patients were identified through filled prescriptions for adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETA), certolizumab pegol (CZP), and golimumab (GLM) between 5/6/2010 and 12/31/2012 from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Persistence was estimated using survival analysis. Costs were derived from HCRU and comprised specialized outpatient care, inpatient care and non-disease-modifying antirheumatic drug medications. A total of 4903 patients were identified (ADA: 1823, ETA: 1704, CZP: 622, GLM: 754). Comparisons over 3 years showed that GLM had significantly higher persistence than ADA (p = 0.022) and ETA (p = 0.004). The mean difference in non-biologic HCRU costs between persistent and non-persistent patients was higher after compared to before the start of biologic therapy. SC-TNFi-naïve IMRD patients initiating treatment with GLM had significantly higher persistence rates than patients initiating treatment with ADA or ETA in Sweden. Furthermore, persistence rates observed in the study were lower than those observed in clinical trials, highlighting the need for an all-party (provider-patient-payer-drug manufacturer) engagement and development of programs to increase persistence rates in clinical practice, thus leading to improved clinical outcomes. In addition, the results of this study indicate that persistence to treatment with SC-TNFi may be associated with cost offsets in terms of non-biologic costs.
PubMed ID
26780533 View in PubMed
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