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Adolescent injuries in Canada: findings from the Canadian community health survey, 2000-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164771
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2006 Dec;13(4):235-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Frank Mo
Michelle C Turner
Daniel Krewski
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5, Canada.
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2006 Dec;13(4):235-44
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
This article presents a description of injuries among 24312 Canadian adolescents, aged 12-24 years, based on the Canadian Community Health Survey, 2000-2001. A total of 3214 (25.6%) males and 2227 (16.5%) females reported having at least one serious injury in the past year. The leading causes of injury in adolescents were: falls; overexertion or strenuous movement; accidentally bumped, pushed or bitten; and accidentally struck or crushed by objects. The parts of the body most often affected were the ankles/feet, wrists/ hands and knees/lower legs. The most frequent locations of injuries were: sports or athletic areas; home; school, college or university areas; and the street, highway or pavement. Injuries were more often reported to have occurred during the summer months. Low socio-economic status was inversely associated with the occurrence of injury in the past year whereas risk-taking behaviour in the form of cigarette smoking and drinking alcohol was positively associated with injury occurrence.
PubMed ID
17345722 View in PubMed
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Clinical holistic medicine: holistic rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47029
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 5;5:280-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Mark Gringols
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Medicine and Quality of Life Research Center, Teglgårdstraede 4-8, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 5;5:280-7
Date
Apr-5-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cerebrovascular Accident - therapy
Character
Diabetes mellitus, type 2 - therapy
Dizziness - etiology - therapy
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Male
Obesity - therapy
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Quality of life, health, and ability are often lost at the same time and most often in one decaying existential movement over 5 or 10 years. This "loss of life" is mostly too slow to be felt as life threatening, but once awakened to reality, it provokes the deepest of fears in patients: the fear of death itself and destruction of our mere existence. The horrible experience of having "lost life", often without even noticing how it happened, can be turned into a strong motivation for improvement. Personal development is about finding the life deeply hidden within in order to induce revitalization and rehabilitation. Rehabilitation is about philosophy of life with the integration of the repressed painful feelings and emotions from the past and the letting go of the associated negative beliefs and decisions. The holistic medical toolbox builds on existential theories (the quality of life theories, the life mission theory, the theory of character, the theory of talent, and the holistic process theory) and seems to have the power to rehabilitate the purpose of life, the character of the person, and fundamental existential dimensions of man: (1) love; (2) strength of mind, feelings, and body; and 3) joy, gender, and sexuality; allowing the person once again to express and realize his talents and full potential. The principles of rehabilitation are not very different from other healing, but the task is often more demanding for the holistic physician as the motivation and resources often are very low and the treatment can take many years.
PubMed ID
15962194 View in PubMed
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Clinical holistic medicine: holistic treatment of mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68251
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 May 23;5:427-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2005
Author
Soren Ventegodt
Niels Jorgen Andersen
Shimshon Neikrug
Isack Kandel
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Medicine and Quality of Life Research Center, Teglgårdstraede 4-8, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 May 23;5:427-45
Date
May-23-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety Disorders - therapy
Existentialism - psychology
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Models, Psychological
Mood Disorders - therapy
Psychiatry - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - therapy
Abstract
We believe that holistic medicine can be used for patients with mental health disorders. With holistic psychiatry, it is possible to help the mentally ill patient to heal existentially. As in holistic medicine, the methods are love or intense care, winning the trust of the patient, getting permission to give support and holding, and daring to be fully at the patient's service. Our clinical experiences have led us to believe that mental health patients can heal if only you can make him or her feel the existential pain at its full depth, understand what the message of the suffering is, and let go of all the negative attitudes and beliefs connected with the disease. Many mentally ill young people would benefit from a few hours of existential holistic processing in order to confront the core existential pains. To help the mentally ill patient, you must understand the level of responsibility and help process the old traumas that made the patient escape responsibility for his or her own life and destiny. To guide the work, we have developed a responsibility scale going from (1) free perception over (2) emotional pain to (3) psychic death (denial of life purpose) further down to (4) escape and (5) denial to (6) destruction of own perception and (7) hallucination further down to (8) coma, suicide, and unconsciousness. This scale seems to be a valuable tool to understand the state of consciousness and the nature of the process of healing that the patient must go through.
PubMed ID
15915297 View in PubMed
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Clinical holistic medicine: mental disorders in a holistic perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51851
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 12;5:313-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Niels Jørgen Andersen
Shimshon Neikrug
Isack Kandel
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Medicine and Quality of Life Research Center, Teglgårdstraede 4-5, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 12;5:313-23
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Character
Female
Goals
Holistic Health
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Personality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Suicide
Abstract
From a holistic perspective, psychiatric diseases are caused by the patient's unwillingness to assume responsibility for his life, existence, and personal relations. The loss of responsibility arises from the repression of the fundamental existential dimensions of the patients. Repression of love and purpose causes depersonalization (i.e., a lack of responsibility for being yourself and for the contact with others, loss of direction and purpose in life). Repression of strength in mind and emotions leads to derealization (the breakdown of the reality testing, often with mental delusions and hallucinations). The repression of joy and gender leads to devitalization (emotional emptiness, loss of joy, personal energy, sexuality, and pleasure in life). The losses of existential dimensions are invariably connected to traumas with life-denying decisions. Healing the wounds of the soul by holding and processing will lead to the recovery of the person's character, purpose of life, and existential responsibility. It can be very difficult to help a psychotic patient. The physician must first love his patient unconditionally and then fully understand the patient in order to meet and support the patient to initiate the holistic process of healing. It takes motivation and willingness to suffer on behalf of the patients in order to heal, as the existential and emotional pain of the traumas resulting in insanity is often overwhelming. We believe that most psychiatric diseases can be alleviated or cured by the loving and caring physician who masters the holistic toolbox. Further research is needed to document the effect of holistic medicine in psychiatry.
PubMed ID
15962198 View in PubMed
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Clinical holistic medicine: the existential crisis--life crisis, stress, and burnout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45684
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 6;5:300-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-6-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Isack Kandel
Shimshon Neikrug
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Health and Quality of Life Research Center, Teglgårdstraede 4-8, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 6;5:300-12
Date
Apr-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - therapy
Creativeness
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spirituality
Stress, Psychological - therapy
Abstract
The triple and parallel loss of quality of life, health, and ability without an organic reason is what we normally recognize as a life crisis, stress, or a burnout. Not being in control is often a terrible and unexpected experience. Failure on the large existential scale is not a part of our expectations, but most people will experience it. The key to getting well again is to get resources and help, which most people experience with shame and guilt. Stress and burnout might seem to be temporary problems that are easily handled, but often the problems stay. It is very important for the physician to identify this pattern and help the patient to realize the difficulties and seriousness of the situation, thus helping the patient to assume responsibility and prevent existential disaster, suicide, or severe depression. As soon as the patient is an ally in fighting the dark side of life and works with him/herself, the first step has been reached. Existential pain is really a message to us indicating that we are about to grow and heal. In our view, existential problems are gifts that are painful to receive, but wise to accept. Existential problems require skill on the part of the holistic physician or therapist in order to help people return to life--to their self-esteem, self-confidence, and trust in others. In this paper, we describe how we have met the patients soul to soul and guided them through the old pains and losses in order to get back on the track to life.
PubMed ID
15962197 View in PubMed
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Clinical holistic medicine: the patient with multiple diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45683
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 12;5:324-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Medicine and Quality of Life Research Center, Teglgårdstraede 4-8, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 12;5:324-39
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Character
Chronic Disease
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Infection - complications - therapy
Mental Disorders - complications - therapy
Nervous System Diseases - complications - therapy
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In clinical practice, patients can present with many different diseases, often both somatic and mental. Holistic medicine will try to see the diseases as a whole, as symptoms of a more fundamental imbalance in the state of being. The holistic physician must help the patient to recover existence and a good relationship with self. According to the life mission theory, theory of character, and holistic process theory of healing, recovering the purpose of life (the life mission) is essential for the patient to regain life, love, and trust in order to find happiness and realize the true purpose of life. We illustrate the power of the holistic medical approach with a case study of an invalidated female artist, aged 42 years, who suffered from multiple severe health problems, many of which had been chronic for years. She had a combination of neurological disturbances (tinnitus, migraine, minor hallucinations), immunological disturbances (recurrent herpes simplex, phlegm in the throat, fungal infection in the crotch), hormonal disturbances (14 days of menstruation in each cycle), muscle disturbances (neck tensions), mental disturbances (tendency to cry, inferiority feeling, mild depression, desolation, anxiety), abdominal complaints, hemorrhoids, and more. The treatment was a combined strategy of improving the general quality of life, recovering her human character and purpose of life ("renewing the patients life energy", "balancing her global information system"), and processing the local blockages, thus healing most of her many different diseases in a treatment using 30 h of intense holistic therapy over a period of 18 months.
PubMed ID
15962199 View in PubMed
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Events in pregnancy, delivery, and infancy and long-term effects on global quality of life: results from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58148
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2005 Aug;11(8):CR357-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Trine Flensborg-Madsen
Niels Jørgen Andersen
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
The Quality of Life Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2005 Aug;11(8):CR357-65
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Pregnancy - physiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To study causal associations between factors occurring during pregnancy, birth, and infancy and global quality of life (QOL) in adulthood 31-33 years later. MATERIAL/METHODS: Prospective study from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61. Two sets of questionnaires, one filled out by physicians during pregnancy, birth, and infancy and a validated, self-administered questionnaire on global quality of life (QOL) filled out by the person 31-33 years later (7,222 people). RESULTS: Only a few of the factors examined showed association with later QOL. Regarding the mothers, associations were found between global QOL and mothers with congenital malformations (8.8%) or syphilis (8.5%), failing contraception (3.8%), and low social group (6.9%). Two main factors in pregnancy associated with reduced QOL for the child 31-33 years later: the mother's smoking habits (2.7%) and her medication, especially painkillers (15.3%) and different psychotropic drugs, with the association most prevalent early in pregnancy. Most of the associations found involved factors during the child's first year, including the mother's attitude towards her pregnancy (3.4%), unsuccessful abortions (2.2%), institutionalization (7.4%), meningitis (11.7%), and psychomotor development (14.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The results appear to disagree with previous reports that factors occurring during pregnancy, birth, and infancy are highly important for the later quality of life of the adult child. In accordance with other studies, this suggests that the aspects important for quality of life are influenced only to a minor degree by earlier conditions, but the major aspects are dependent on later attitudes towards life and philosophy of life.
PubMed ID
16049377 View in PubMed
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Factors during pregnancy, delivery and birth affecting global quality of life of the adult child at long-term follow-up. Results from the prospective Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29329
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Dec 1;5:933-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Trine Flensborg-Madsen
Niels Jørgen Anderson
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Medicine, Teglgårdstraede 4-8, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Dec 1;5:933-41
Date
Dec-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
This paper presents a prospective cohort study, where we explore associations between pregnancy, delivery and the global quality of life (QOL) of the adult child 31-33 years later. The data is from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61 using two sets of questionnaires send to 7,222 persons: one filled out by physicians during pregnancy and delivery, while the follow-up questionnaire was completed by the adult children 31-33 years later. The main outcome measures were objective factors describing pregnancy and delivery along with global quality of life, including: well-being, life satisfaction, happiness, fulfillment of needs, experience of life's temporal and spatial domains, expression of life's potentials and objective measures. Results showed two main factors in pregnancy that seemed to be associated with a reduced quality of life for the child 31-33 years later: the mother's smoking habits and the mother's medication--especially painkillers and different psychopharmacological drugs with the association being most prevalent early in pregnancy. Considering what can and do go wrong during the various stages of labour and delivery and considering how few connections we found between the factors examined and the later global QOL, it seems that the child is remarkably resilient to external influences during pregnancy and delivery as concerns global QOL in adulthood.
PubMed ID
16327937 View in PubMed
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The health and social situation of the mother during pregnancy and global quality of life of the child as an adult. Results from the prospective Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort 1959-1961.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29328
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Dec 2;5:950-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Trine Flensborg-Madsen
Niels Jørgen Andersen
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Medicine, Teglgårdstraede 4-8, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Dec 2;5:950-8
Date
Dec-2-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
A prospective cohort study (Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61) of 7,222 persons was used in order to explore the association between the social and health situation during pregnancy and the global quality of life (QOL) of the adult child 31-33 years later. Two sets of questionnaires were used with one filled out by physicians during pregnancy and one filled out by the adult children 31-33 years later. The questionnaires included mother's situation during pregnancy and global QOL of the child at follow-up: Well-being, life satisfaction, happiness, fulfillment of needs, experience of life's temporal and spatial domains, expression of life's potentials and objective measures. The only indicators to have clear connections with a reduced quality of life were the cases of mother's with syphilis (8.5%), mother's congenital malformations (8.8%), low social group (6.9%) and failing contraception (3.8%). The results obtained repudiate the common notion and hypothesis that the mother's situation during pregnancy is highly important for the quality of life that the child experience as an adult. This suggest that the aspects important for quality of life later on are not found solely in early conditions, but instead more dependent on later attitude towards life of that specific person.
PubMed ID
16327939 View in PubMed
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Holistic medicine: scientific challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50665
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2003 Nov 13;3:1108-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-13-2003
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Niels Jørgen Andersen
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
The Quality of Life Research Center, Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2003 Nov 13;3:1108-16
Date
Nov-13-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Existentialism - psychology
Holistic Health
Humans
Quality of Life - psychology
Research - trends
Abstract
The field of holistic medicine is in need of a scientific approach. We need holistic medicine--and we even need it to be spiritual to include the depths of human existence--but we need it to be a little less "cosmic" in order to encompass the whole human being. Many important research questions and challenges, empirical as well as theoretical, demand the attention from medical researchers. Like a number of other practitioners and researchers, our group at the Quality of Life Research Center in Denmark together with groups in Norway and Israel are trying to tackle the research challenge by using conceptual frameworks of quality of life. We have suggested that quality of life represents a third influence on health beyond the genetic and traumatic factors so far emphasized by mainstream medicine. In our clinical and research efforts, we attempt to specify what a clinician may do to help patients help themselves, by mobilizing the vast resources hidden in their subjective worlds and existence, in their hopes and dreams, and their will to live. The field of holistic medicine must be upgraded to fully integrate human consciousness, scientifically as well as philosophically. We therefore present a number of important research questions for a consciousness-based holistic medicine. New directions in healthcare are called for and we need a new vision of the future of the healthcare sector in the industrialized countries. Every person seems to have immense potentials for self-healing that we scarcely know how to mobilize. A new holistic medicine must find ways to tackle this key challenge. A healthcare system that could do that successfully would bring quality of life, health, and new ability of functioning to many people.
PubMed ID
14625397 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.