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Extensive fires in southeastern Siberian permafrost linked to preceding Arctic Oscillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307310
Source
Sci Adv. 2020 01; 6(2):eaax3308
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
Jin-Soo Kim
Jong-Seong Kug
Su-Jong Jeong
Hotaek Park
Gabriela Schaepman-Strub
Author Affiliation
School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
Source
Sci Adv. 2020 01; 6(2):eaax3308
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Carbon release through boreal fires could considerably accelerate Arctic warming; however, boreal fire occurrence mechanisms and dynamics remain largely unknown. Here, we analyze fire activity and relevant large-scale atmospheric conditions over southeastern Siberia, which has the largest burned area fraction in the circumboreal and high-level carbon emissions due to high-density peatlands. It is found that the annual burned area increased when a positive Arctic Oscillation (AO) takes place in early months of the year, despite peak fire season occurring 1 to 2 months later. A local high-pressure system linked to the AO drives a high-temperature anomaly in late winter, causing premature snowmelt. This causes earlier ground surface exposure and drier ground in spring due to enhanced evaporation, promoting fire spreading. Recently, southeastern Siberia has experienced warming and snow retreat; therefore, southeastern Siberia requires appropriate fire management strategies to prevent massive carbon release and accelerated global warming.
PubMed ID
31934623 View in PubMed
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The intensification of Arctic warming as a result of CO2 physiological forcing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306077
Source
Nat Commun. 2020 04 29; 11(1):2098
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-29-2020
Author
So-Won Park
Jin-Soo Kim
Jong-Seong Kug
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, South Korea.
Source
Nat Commun. 2020 04 29; 11(1):2098
Date
04-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Stomatal closure is one of the main physiological responses to increasing CO2 concentration, which leads to a reduction in plant water loss. This response has the potential to trigger changes in the climate system by regulating surface energy budgets-a phenomenon known as CO2 physiological forcing. However, its remote impacts on the Arctic climate system are unclear. Here we show that vegetation at high latitudes enhances the Arctic amplification via remote and time-delayed physiological forcing processes. Surface warming occurs at mid-to-high latitudes due to the physiological acclimation-induced reduction in evaporative cooling and resultant increase in sensible heat flux. This excessive surface heat energy is transported to the Arctic ocean and contributes to the sea ice loss, thereby enhancing Arctic warming. The surface warming in the Arctic is further amplified by local feedbacks, and consequently the contribution of physiological effects to Arctic warming represents about 10% of radiative forcing effects.
PubMed ID
32350268 View in PubMed
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