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Breeding seabirds as vectors of microplastics from sea to land: Evidence from colonies in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304423
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Apr 10; 764:142808
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-10-2021
Author
Madelaine P T Bourdages
Jennifer F Provencher
Julia E Baak
Mark L Mallory
Jesse C Vermaire
Author Affiliation
Carleton University, Geography and Environmental Studies, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada. Electronic address: madelainebourdages@cmail.carleton.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Apr 10; 764:142808
Date
Apr-10-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Birds
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Microplastics
Plastics
Abstract
The presence and persistence of microplastics in the environment is increasingly recognized, however, how they are distributed throughout environmental systems requires further understanding. Seabirds have been identified as vectors of chemical contaminants from marine to terrestrial environments, and studies have recently identified seabirds as possible vectors of plastic pollution in the marine environment. However, their role in the distribution of microplastic pollution in the Arctic has yet to be explored. We examined two species of seabirds known to ingest plastics: northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis; n = 27) and thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia; n = 30) as potential vectors for the transport of microplastics in and around breeding colonies. Our results indicated anthropogenic particles in the faecal precursors of both species. Twenty-four anthropogenic particles were found in the fulmar faecal precursor samples (M = 0.89, SD = 1.09; 23 fibres and one fragment), and 10 anthropogenic particles were found in the murre faecal precursor samples (M = 0.33, SD = 0.92; 5 fibres, 4 fragments, and one foam). Through the use of bird population surveys and the quantification of anthropogenic particles found in the faecal precursors of sampled seabirds from the same colony, we estimate that fulmars and murres may deposit between 3.3 (CIboot 1.9 × 106-4.9 × 106) and 45.5 (CIboot 9.1 × 106-91.9 × 106) million anthropogenic particles, respectively, per year into the environment during their breeding period at these colonies. These estimates indicate that migratory seabirds could be contributing to the distribution and local hotspots of microplastics in Arctic environments, however, they are still likely a relatively small source of plastic pollution in terms of mass in the environment and may not contribute as much as other reported sources such as atmospheric deposition in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
33082039 View in PubMed
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Late Holocene climatic variability in Subarctic Canada: Insights from a high-resolution lake record from the central Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292541
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199872
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
April S Dalton
R Timothy Patterson
Helen M Roe
Andrew L Macumber
Graeme T Swindles
Jennifer M Galloway
Jesse C Vermaire
Carley A Crann
Hendrik Falck
Author Affiliation
Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre and Department of Earth Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199872
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
We examined late Holocene (ca. 3300 yr BP to present-day) climate variability in the central Northwest Territories (Canadian Subarctic) using a diatom and sedimentological record from Danny's Lake (63.48ºN, 112.54ºW), located 40 km southwest of the modern-day treeline. High-resolution sampling paired with a robust age model (25 radiocarbon dates) allowed for the examination of both lake hydroecological conditions (30-year intervals; diatoms) and sedimentological changes in the watershed (12-year intervals; grain size records) over the late Holocene. Time series analysis of key lake ecological indicators (diatom species Aulacoseira alpigena, Pseudostaurosira brevistriata and Achnanthidium minutissimum) and sedimentological parameters, reflective of catchment processes (coarse silt fraction), suggests significant intermittent variations in turbidity, pH and light penetration within the lake basin. In the diatom record, we observed discontinuous periodicities in the range of ca. 69, 88-100, 115-132, 141-188, 562, 750 and 900 years (>90% and >95% confidence intervals), whereas the coarse silt fraction was characterized by periodicities in the >901 and 95% confidence interval). Periodicities in the proxy data from the Danny's Lake sediment core align with changes in total solar irradiance over the past ca. 3300 yr BP and we hypothesize a link to the Suess Cycle, Gleissberg Cycle and Pacific Decadal Oscillation via occasional inland propagation of shifting air masses over the Pacific Ocean. This research represents an important baseline study of the underlying causes of climate variability in the Canadian Subarctic and provides details on the long-term climate variability that has persisted in this region through the past three thousand years.
Notes
Cites: Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2015 May;90(2):522-41 PMID 24917134
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Mar 22;102(12):4397-402 PMID 15738395
Cites: Ann Rev Mar Sci. 2010;2:115-43 PMID 21141660
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Mar 23;101(12):4136-41 PMID 15016919
Cites: Sci Rep. 2014 Jan 09;4:3611 PMID 24402348
PubMed ID
29953559 View in PubMed
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Late Holocene climatic variability in Subarctic Canada: Insights from a high-resolution lake record from the central Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296859
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199872
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
April S Dalton
R Timothy Patterson
Helen M Roe
Andrew L Macumber
Graeme T Swindles
Jennifer M Galloway
Jesse C Vermaire
Carley A Crann
Hendrik Falck
Author Affiliation
Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre and Department of Earth Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199872
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Canada
Climate change
Diatoms
Fossils
Lakes
Abstract
We examined late Holocene (ca. 3300 yr BP to present-day) climate variability in the central Northwest Territories (Canadian Subarctic) using a diatom and sedimentological record from Danny's Lake (63.48ºN, 112.54ºW), located 40 km southwest of the modern-day treeline. High-resolution sampling paired with a robust age model (25 radiocarbon dates) allowed for the examination of both lake hydroecological conditions (30-year intervals; diatoms) and sedimentological changes in the watershed (12-year intervals; grain size records) over the late Holocene. Time series analysis of key lake ecological indicators (diatom species Aulacoseira alpigena, Pseudostaurosira brevistriata and Achnanthidium minutissimum) and sedimentological parameters, reflective of catchment processes (coarse silt fraction), suggests significant intermittent variations in turbidity, pH and light penetration within the lake basin. In the diatom record, we observed discontinuous periodicities in the range of ca. 69, 88-100, 115-132, 141-188, 562, 750 and 900 years (>90% and >95% confidence intervals), whereas the coarse silt fraction was characterized by periodicities in the >901 and 95% confidence interval). Periodicities in the proxy data from the Danny's Lake sediment core align with changes in total solar irradiance over the past ca. 3300 yr BP and we hypothesize a link to the Suess Cycle, Gleissberg Cycle and Pacific Decadal Oscillation via occasional inland propagation of shifting air masses over the Pacific Ocean. This research represents an important baseline study of the underlying causes of climate variability in the Canadian Subarctic and provides details on the long-term climate variability that has persisted in this region through the past three thousand years.
PubMed ID
29953559 View in PubMed
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Lead contamination from gold mining in Yellowknife Bay (Northwest Territories), reconstructed using stable lead isotopes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307036
Source
Environ Pollut. 2020 Apr; 259:113888
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Nicolas Pelletier
John Chételat
Brian Cousens
Shuangquang Zhang
Dan Stepner
Derek C G Muir
Jesse C Vermaire
Author Affiliation
Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2020 Apr; 259:113888
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bays - chemistry
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Gold
Isotopes - analysis
Lead - analysis
Mining
Northwest Territories
Abstract
The contributions of contaminant sources are difficult to resolve in the sediment record using concentration gradients and flux reconstruction alone. In this study, we demonstrate that source partitioning using lead isotopes provide complementary and unique information to concentration gradients to evaluate point-source releases, transport, and recovery of metal mining pollution in the environment. We analyzed eight sediment cores, collected within 24 km of two gold mines, for Pb stable isotopes, Pb concentration, and sediment chronology. Stable Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/204Pb) of mining ore were different from those of background (pre-disturbance) sediment, allowing the use of a quantitative mixing model. As previously reported for some Arctic lakes, Pb isotope ratios indicated negligible aerosol inputs to sediment from regional or long-range pollution sources, possibly related to low annual precipitation. Maximum recorded Pb flux at each site reached up to 63 mg m-2 yr-1 in the period corresponding to early years of mining when pollution mitigation measures were at a minimum (1950s-1960s). The maximum contribution of mining-derived Pb to these fluxes declined with distance from the mines from 92 ± 8% to 8 ± 4% at the farthest site. Mining-derived Pb was still present at the sediment surface within 9 km of Giant Mine more than ten years after mine closure (5-26 km, 95% confidence interval) and model estimates suggest it could be present for another ~50-100 years. These results highlight the persistence of Pb pollution in freshwater sediment and the usefulness of Pb stable isotopes to quantify spatial and temporal trends of contamination from mining pollution, particularly as concentrations approach background.
PubMed ID
32023786 View in PubMed
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Microplastics around an Arctic seabird colony: Particle community composition varies across environmental matrices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312142
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Jun 15; 773:145536
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-15-2021
Author
Bonnie M Hamilton
Madelaine P T Bourdages
Catherine Geoffroy
Jesse C Vermaire
Mark L Mallory
Chelsea M Rochman
Jennifer F Provencher
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Dept. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: b.hamilton@mail.utoronto.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Jun 15; 773:145536
Date
Jun-15-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Birds
Canada
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Microplastics
Plastics
Abstract
Plastic pollution is a contaminant of global concern, as it is present even in remote ecosystems - like the Arctic. Arctic seabirds are vulnerable to ingesting plastic pollution, and these ingested particles are shed in the form of microplastics via guano. This suggests that Arctic seabird guano may act as a vector for the movement of microplastics into and around northern ecosystems. While contaminant-laden guano deposition patterns create a clear concentration gradient of chemicals around seabird colonies, this has not yet been investigated with plastic pollution. Here we tested whether a contaminant gradient of plastic pollution exists around a seabird colony that is primarily comprised of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) in the Canadian Arctic. Atmospheric deposition, surface water, and surface sediment samples were collected below the cliff-side of the colony and at increasing intervals of 1 km from the colony. Fulmars were also collected when foraging away from their colony. Microplastics and other anthropogenic microparticles were identified in all three environmental matrices as well as fulmar guano. Fibers were the most common shape in fulmar guano, atmospheric deposition and surface sediment, and fragments were the most common shape in surface water. We did not find a gradient of microplastic concentrations in environmental matrices related to distance from the colony. Combined, these results suggest that fulmars are not the primary source of microplastic around this colony. Further research is warranted to understand sources of microplastics to the areas around the colonies, including to what extent seabirds transport and concentrate microplastics in Arctic ecosystems, and whether concentrations proximate to large colonies may be species dependent.
PubMed ID
33940730 View in PubMed
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No plastics detected in seal (Phocidae) stomachs harvested in the eastern Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307919
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2020 Jan; 150:110772
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2020
Author
Madelaine P T Bourdages
Jennifer F Provencher
Enooyaq Sudlovenick
Steven H Ferguson
Brent G Young
Nicolas Pelletier
Michael J J Murphy
Alexa D'Addario
Jesse C Vermaire
Author Affiliation
Carleton University, Geography and Environmental Studies, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada. Electronic address: madelainebourdages@cmail.carleton.ca.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2020 Jan; 150:110772
Date
Jan-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Gastrointestinal Contents - chemistry
Phoca
Plastics - analysis
Seals, Earless
Stomach
Water Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Through collaboration with Inuit hunters, we examined the stomach contents of 142 seals (ringed seals [Phoca hispida; n = 135], bearded seals [Erignathus barbatus; n = 6], and one harbour seal [Phoca vitualina; n = 1]) hunted between 2007 and 2019 from communities around Nunavut to assess whether seals in the eastern Canadian Arctic ingest and retain plastics in their stomachs. The seals in this study ranged from juveniles to adults of up to 30 years of age, and 55% of the seals were males. We found no evidence of plastic ingestion in any of the seals suggesting that seals in Nunavut are not accumulating plastics (>425 µm) in their stomachs. These data provide important baseline information for future plastic pollution monitoring programs in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
31787340 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.