Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

The impact of health changes on labor supply: evidence from merged data on individual objective medical diagnosis codes and early retirement behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124554
Source
Health Econ. 2012 Jun;21 Suppl 1:56-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Bent Jesper Christensen
Malene Kallestrup-Lamb
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. bjchris-tensen@econ.au.dk
Source
Health Econ. 2012 Jun;21 Suppl 1:56-100
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Clinical Coding
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Denmark
Female
Health status
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Econometric
Old Age Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The justification bias in the estimated impact of health shocks on retirement is mitigated by using objective health measures from a large, register-based longitudinal data set including medical diagnosis codes, along with labor market status, financial, and socio-economic variables. The duration until retirement is modeled using single and competing risk specifications, observed and unobserved heterogeneity, and flexible baseline hazards. Wealth is used as a proxy for elapsed duration to mitigate the potential selection bias stemming from conditioning on initial participation. The competing risk specification distinguishes complete multiperiod routes to retirement, such as unemployment followed by early retirement. A result on comparison of coefficients across all states is offered. The empirical results indicate a strong impact of health changes on retirement and hence a large potential for public policy measures intended to retain older workers longer in the labor force. Disability responds more to health shocks than early retirement, especially to diseases of the circulatory, respiratory, and musculoskeletal systems, as well as mental and behavioral disorders. Some unemployment spells followed by early retirement appear voluntary and spurred by life style diseases.
PubMed ID
22556002 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as sentinels for the elucidation of Arctic environmental change processes: a comprehensive review combined with ArcRisk project results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299344
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Aug; 25(23):22499-22528
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Pernilla Carlsson
Knut Breivik
Eva Brorström-Lundén
Ian Cousins
Jesper Christensen
Joan O Grimalt
Crispin Halsall
Roland Kallenborn
Khaled Abass
Gerhard Lammel
John Munthe
Matthew MacLeod
Jon Øyvind Odland
Janet Pawlak
Arja Rautio
Lars-Otto Reiersen
Martin Schlabach
Irene Stemmler
Simon Wilson
Henry Wöhrnschimmel
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), 0349, Oslo, Norway. pernilla.carlsson@niva.no.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Aug; 25(23):22499-22528
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Ice
Models, Theoretical
Oceans and Seas
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Rivers - chemistry
Seasons
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can be used as chemical sentinels for the assessment of anthropogenic influences on Arctic environmental change. We present an overview of studies on PCBs in the Arctic and combine these with the findings from ArcRisk-a major European Union-funded project aimed at examining the effects of climate change on the transport of contaminants to and their behaviour of in the Arctic-to provide a case study on the behaviour and impact of PCBs over time in the Arctic. PCBs in the Arctic have shown declining trends in the environment over the last few decades. Atmospheric long-range transport from secondary and primary sources is the major input of PCBs to the Arctic region. Modelling of the atmospheric PCB composition and behaviour showed some increases in environmental concentrations in a warmer Arctic, but the general decline in PCB levels is still the most prominent feature. 'Within-Arctic' processing of PCBs will be affected by climate change-related processes such as changing wet deposition. These in turn will influence biological exposure and uptake of PCBs. The pan-Arctic rivers draining large Arctic/sub-Arctic catchments provide a significant source of PCBs to the Arctic Ocean, although changes in hydrology/sediment transport combined with a changing marine environment remain areas of uncertainty with regard to PCB fate. Indirect effects of climate change on human exposure, such as a changing diet will influence and possibly reduce PCB exposure for indigenous peoples. Body burdens of PCBs have declined since the 1980s and are predicted to decline further.
PubMed ID
29956262 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as sentinels for the elucidation of Arctic environmental change processes: a comprehensive review combined with ArcRisk project results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292539
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Jun 28; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-28-2018
Author
Pernilla Carlsson
Knut Breivik
Eva Brorström-Lundén
Ian Cousins
Jesper Christensen
Joan O Grimalt
Crispin Halsall
Roland Kallenborn
Khaled Abass
Gerhard Lammel
John Munthe
Matthew MacLeod
Jon Øyvind Odland
Janet Pawlak
Arja Rautio
Lars-Otto Reiersen
Martin Schlabach
Irene Stemmler
Simon Wilson
Henry Wöhrnschimmel
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), 0349, Oslo, Norway. pernilla.carlsson@niva.no.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Jun 28; :
Date
Jun-28-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can be used as chemical sentinels for the assessment of anthropogenic influences on Arctic environmental change. We present an overview of studies on PCBs in the Arctic and combine these with the findings from ArcRisk-a major European Union-funded project aimed at examining the effects of climate change on the transport of contaminants to and their behaviour of in the Arctic-to provide a case study on the behaviour and impact of PCBs over time in the Arctic. PCBs in the Arctic have shown declining trends in the environment over the last few decades. Atmospheric long-range transport from secondary and primary sources is the major input of PCBs to the Arctic region. Modelling of the atmospheric PCB composition and behaviour showed some increases in environmental concentrations in a warmer Arctic, but the general decline in PCB levels is still the most prominent feature. 'Within-Arctic' processing of PCBs will be affected by climate change-related processes such as changing wet deposition. These in turn will influence biological exposure and uptake of PCBs. The pan-Arctic rivers draining large Arctic/sub-Arctic catchments provide a significant source of PCBs to the Arctic Ocean, although changes in hydrology/sediment transport combined with a changing marine environment remain areas of uncertainty with regard to PCB fate. Indirect effects of climate change on human exposure, such as a changing diet will influence and possibly reduce PCB exposure for indigenous peoples. Body burdens of PCBs have declined since the 1980s and are predicted to decline further.
PubMed ID
29956262 View in PubMed
Less detail