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Bacterial contamination of blood components: Norwegian strategies in identifying donors with higher risk of inducing septic transfusion reactions in recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266747
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2014 Oct;51(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Sofie Strand Klausen
Tor Hervig
Jerard Seghatchian
Håkon Reikvam
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2014 Oct;51(2):97-102
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Donors
Blood Preservation
Blood Safety - methods
Donor Selection - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Platelet Transfusion - adverse effects
Risk factors
Sepsis - blood - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Bacterial contamination of blood and its cellular components remains the most common microbiological cause of transfusion associated morbidity and mortality, even in developed countries. This yet unresolved complication is seen more often in platelet transfusions, as platelet concentrates are stored at room temperature, in gas permeable containers with constant agitation, which support bacterial proliferation from relatively low undetectable levels, at the beginning of storage time, to relatively high virulent bacteria titers and endotoxin generation, at the end of shelf life. Accordingly, several combined strategies are introduced and implemented to at least reduce the potential risk of bacterial contaminated products for transfusion. These embody: improved donors arms cleaning; bacterial avoidance by diversion of the first portion of collection; reducing bacterial growth through development of newer storage media for longer platelet shelf life; bacterial load reduction by leucoreduction/viral inactivation, in some countries and eliminating the use potentially contaminated units through screening, through current available testing procedures, though none are not yet fully secure. We have not seen the same reduction in bacterial associated transfusion infections as we have observed for the sharp drop in transfusion associated transmission rates of HIV and hepatitis B and C. This great viral reduction is not only caused by the introduction of newer and more sensitive and specific detection methods for different viruses, but also the identification of donor risk groups through questionnaires and personal interviews. While search for more efficient methods for identifying potential blood donors with asymptomatic bacteremia, as well as a better way for detecting bacteria in stored blood components will be continuing, it is necessary to establish more standardized guidelines for the recognition the adverse reactions in recipients of potentially contaminated units. Efforts also should be also directed to identify blood donors with significant risk of bacteremia, at the time of donation in the first place as a high priority. The goal of this review is to highlights strategies for identifying both the sources of bacterial contamination of blood components in Norway and identifying donors with a higher risk of bacteremia at the time of donation. The key to achieving this goal is initiating continual revising and upgrading the Norwegian transfusion guidelines, based on the transfusion legislation and by introducing a relevant specialized donor bacterial questionnaire.
PubMed ID
25242310 View in PubMed
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News on implementing two new patient-focused strategies: A patient blood management program in Norway and validation of two dedicated assays for measuring Dabigatran when used for long term antithrombotic therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281196
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2016 Jun;54(3):421
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016

Norwegian Red Cross--80 years in service for blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261920
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2014 Feb;50(1):136-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Tor Ole Bergan
Tor Hervig
Jerard Seghatchian
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2014 Feb;50(1):136-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Banks - organization & administration
Blood Donors
Blood Transfusion - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Norway
Red Cross
Abstract
The voluntary, non-remunerated blood donation organization is the important part of the International Red Cross movement. Historically the Red Cross Blood Program was established in Oslo with the main objectives to recruit new donors, support the blood banks with recruiting materials and to support in recruiting efforts made by local Red Cross branches. Currently the continual education of the recruited skilled personals, at all levels, is considered to be an essential part of such a program. The 2013 coincide with the 12th anniversary of Norwegian educational program in Quality in Transfusion Medicine. This report focuses on the historical background on the Red Cross Quality Course in Transfusion Medicine, as well as the progress made so far and looking into future perspectives.
PubMed ID
24485525 View in PubMed
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The use of thromboelastography (TEG) in massively bleeding patients at Haukeland University Hospital 2008-15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299103
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2019 Feb; 58(1):117-121
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Snorre Brundtland Saeveraas
Jerard Seghatchian
Joar Sivertsen
Tor Hervig
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2019 Feb; 58(1):117-121
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Female
Hemorrhage - therapy
History, 21st Century
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Norway
Thrombelastography - methods
Abstract
Thromboelastography (TEG) has been part of the assessment of patients receiving massive transfusion (MT) at Haukeland university hospital (HUH) since 2007. However, the test has been used inconsistently, and in general, the value of the test in evaluation of patients with critical bleeding is still debated, although it has been suggested that the TEG-guided treatment decreases blood usage. This single-centre retrospective study examines the use of TEG and discusses its place as part of assessing MT patients. The study focuses on the amount of blood product transfused in TEG-tested and non-TEG tested patients and whether TEG assisted coagulation therapy has affected mortality compared to conventional coagulation tests (CCTs). The study is based on the data from the massive transfusion study (MTS) 2002-15. 241?MT patients were identified, and they were grouped into patients assessed with TEG and patients who did not get this evaluation. In a sub-analysis, the patients with the initially (first TEG-test) 30 best and 30 worst TEG curves were defined based on normal ranges for the parameters R-time, a-angle, Maximal Amplitude (MA) and lysis after 30?min (LY). Survival rate and blood product usage were compared between these groups and between TEG and non-TEG patients. 111 patients were tested with TEG and 130 were not. The patients with highly pathological TEG curves (worst) have significantly higher mortality than the 30 normal-TEG patients (best) after 24?h (p?
PubMed ID
30616957 View in PubMed
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