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2nd Norwegian Environmental Toxicology Symposium: joining forces for an integrated search for environmental solutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90204
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(3-4):111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and climate change: A worst-case combination for arctic marine mammals and seabirds?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95717
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Apr;114 Suppl 1:76-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Jenssen Bjørn Munro
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. bjorn.munro.jenssen@bio.ntnu.no
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Apr;114 Suppl 1:76-80
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Birds - physiology
Climate
Ecosystem
Endocrine Disruptors - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Greenhouse Effect
Mammals - physiology
Abstract
The effects of global change on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning encompass multiple complex dynamic processes. Climate change and exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are currently regarded as two of the most serious anthropogenic threats to biodiversity and ecosystems. We should, therefore, be especially concerned about the possible effects of EDCs on the ability of Arctic marine mammals and seabirds to adapt to environmental alterations caused by climate change. Relationships between various organochlorine compounds, necessary such as polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorophenyldichloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene, and oxychlordane, and hormones in Arctic mammals and seabirds imply that these chemicals pose a threat to endocrine systems of these animals. The most pronounced relationships have been reported with the thyroid hormone system, but effects are also seen in sex steroid hormones and cortisol. Even though behavioral and morphological effects of persistent organic pollutants are consistent with endocrine disruption, no direct evidence exists for such relationships. Because different endocrine systems are important for enabling animals to respond adequately to environmental stress, EDCs may interfere with adaptations to increased stress situations. Such interacting effects are likely related to adaptive responses regulated by the thyroid, sex steroid, and glucocorticosteroid systems.
PubMed ID
16818250 View in PubMed
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Organochlorine-induced histopathology in kidney and liver tissue from Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93600
Source
Chemosphere. 2008 Apr;71(7):1214-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Sonne Christian
Wolkers Hans
Leifsson Pall S
Jenssen Bjørn Munro
Fuglei Eva
Ahlstrøm Oystein
Dietz Rune
Kirkegaard Maja
Muir Derek C G
Jørgensen Even
Author Affiliation
Section for Contaminants, Effects and Marine Mammals, Department of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej 399, PO Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. csh@dmu.dk
Source
Chemosphere. 2008 Apr;71(7):1214-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Arctic Regions
Energy intake
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Food chain
Foxes - growth & development - metabolism
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - toxicity
Kidney - drug effects - pathology
Kidney Diseases - chemically induced - pathology
Liver - drug effects - pathology
Liver Diseases - chemically induced - pathology
Pesticides - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Abstract
The effects of persistent organic pollutants on renal and liver morphology in farmed arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) were studied under experimental conditions. Control animals received a diet containing pork (Sus scrofa) fat with low amounts of persistent organic pollutants, while the diet of the exposed animals contained whale blubber, 'naturally' contaminated with persistent organic pollutants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorine pesticide (OCP) concentrations in the whale blubber were 488 and 395 ng/g wet weight, respectively. Animals were sacrificed and sampled when they were at their fattest (winter) as well as their lowest body weight (summer). The results show that PCB and OCP exposure causes renal (and probably also liver) lesions in arctic foxes. The prevalence of glomerular, tubular and interstitial lesions was significantly highest in the exposed group (chi-square: all p0.05). The prevalence of lesions was not significantly different between lean (winter) and fat (summer) foxes for any of the lesions (chi-square: all p>0.05). We suggest that wild arctic foxes exposed to an environmental cocktail of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs and OCPs, in their natural diet are at risk for developing chronic kidney and liver damage. Whether such lesions may have an impact on age and health of the animals remains uncertain.
PubMed ID
18279914 View in PubMed
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