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Assessing anthropogenic impact on boreal lakes with historical fish species distribution data and hydrogeochemical modeling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261422
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Sep;20(9):2752-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Salar Valinia
Göran Englund
Filip Moldan
Martyn N Futter
Stephan J Köhler
Kevin Bishop
Jens Fölster
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Sep;20(9):2752-64
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - analysis
Animal Distribution - physiology
Animals
Cyprinidae - physiology
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Groundwater - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lakes - chemistry
Models, Chemical
Population Dynamics
Species Specificity
Sweden
Abstract
Quantifying the effects of human activity on the natural environment is dependent on credible estimates of reference conditions to define the state of the environment before the onset of adverse human impacts. In Europe, emission controls that aimed at restoring ecological status were based on hindcasts from process-based models or paleolimnological reconstructions. For instance, 1860 is used in Europe as the target for restoration from acidification concerning biological and chemical parameters. A more practical problem is that the historical states of ecosystems and their function cannot be observed directly. Therefore, we (i) compare estimates of acidification based on long-term observations of roach (Rutilus rutilus) populations with hindcast pH from the hydrogeochemical model MAGIC; (ii) discuss policy implications and possible scope for use of long-term archival data for assessing human impacts on the natural environment and (iii) present a novel conceptual model for interpreting the importance of physico-chemical and ecological deviations from reference conditions. Of the 85 lakes studied, 78 were coherently classified by both methods. In 1980, 28 lakes were classified as acidified with the MAGIC model, however, roach was present in 14 of these. In 2010, MAGIC predicted chemical recovery in 50% of the lakes, however roach only recolonized in five lakes after 1990, showing a lag between chemical and biological recovery. Our study is the first study of its kind to use long-term archival biological data in concert with hydrogeochemical modeling for regional assessments of anthropogenic acidification. Based on our results, we show how the conceptual model can be used to understand and prioritize management of physico-chemical and ecological effects of anthropogenic stressors on surface water quality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24535943 View in PubMed
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Comparing nutrient reference concentrations in Nordic countries with focus on lowland rivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304742
Source
Ambio. 2020 Nov; 49(11):1771-1783
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2020
Author
Eva Skarbøvik
Jukka Aroviita
Jens Fölster
Anne Lyche Solheim
Katarina Kyllmar
Katri Rankinen
Brian Kronvang
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Bioeconomy Research, NIBIO, P.O. Box. 115, 1431, Ås, Norway. eva.skarbovik@nibio.no.
Source
Ambio. 2020 Nov; 49(11):1771-1783
Date
Nov-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Nitrogen - analysis
Norway
Nutrients
Phosphorus - analysis
Rivers
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Sweden
Abstract
Reference conditions of water bodies are defined as the natural or minimal anthropogenically disturbed state. We compared the methods for determining total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations in rivers in Finland, Norway and Sweden as well as the established reference conditions and evaluated the possibility for transfer and harmonisation of methods. We found that both methods and values differed, especially for lowland rivers with a high proportion of agriculture in the catchment. Since Denmark has not yet set reference conditions for rivers, two of the Nordic methods were tested for Danish conditions. We conclude that some of the established methods are promising but that further development is required. We moreover argue that harmonisation of reference conditions is needed to obtain common benchmarks for assessing the impacts of current and future land use changes on water quality.
PubMed ID
32930955 View in PubMed
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Consequences of intensive forest harvesting on the recovery of Swedish lakes from acidification and on critical load exceedances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294346
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Dec 15; 603-604:562-569
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-15-2017
Author
Filip Moldan
Johanna Stadmark
Jens Fölster
Sara Jutterström
Martyn N Futter
Bernard J Cosby
Richard F Wright
Author Affiliation
IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Box 530 21, 400 14 Göteborg, Sweden. Electronic address: filip.moldan@ivl.se.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Dec 15; 603-604:562-569
Date
Dec-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acids - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Forestry
Forests
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lakes - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Sweden
Trees
Abstract
Across much of the northern hemisphere, lakes are at risk of re-acidification due to incomplete recovery from historical acidification and pressures associated with more intensive forest biomass harvesting. Critical load (CL) calculations aimed at estimating the amount of pollutants an ecosystem can receive without suffering adverse consequences are dependent on these factors. Here, we present a modelling study of the potential effects of intensified forest harvesting on re-acidification of a set of 3239 Swedish lakes based on scenarios with varying intensities of forest biomass harvest and acid deposition. There is some evidence that forestry would have caused a certain level of acidification even if deposition remained at 1860 levels. We show that all plausible harvest scenarios delay recovery due to increased rates of base cation removal. Scenario results were used to estimate critical loads for the entire population of lakes in Sweden. The forestry intensity included in critical load calculations is a political decision. After scaling calculations to the national level, it was apparent that a high but plausible forest harvest intensity would lead to an increase in the area of CL exceedances and that even after significant reductions in forest harvest intensity, there would still be areas with CL exceedances. Our results show that forest harvest intensity and regional environmental change must be carefully considered in future CL calculations.
PubMed ID
28646775 View in PubMed
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Long-term trends in water chemistry of acid-sensitive Swedish lakes show slow recovery from historic acidification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259823
Source
Ambio. 2014;43 Suppl 1:77-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Martyn N Futter
Salar Valinia
Stefan Löfgren
Stephan J Köhler
Jens Fölster
Source
Ambio. 2014;43 Suppl 1:77-90
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lakes - analysis
Seasons
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Quality
Abstract
Long-term (1987-2012) water quality monitoring in 36 acid-sensitive Swedish lakes shows slow recovery from historic acidification. Overall, strong acid anion concentrations declined, primarily as a result of declines in sulfate. Chloride is now the dominant anion in many acid-sensitive lakes. Base cation concentrations have declined less rapidly than strong acid anion concentrations, leading to an increase in charge balance acid neutralizing capacity. In many lakes, modeled organic acidity is now approximately equal to inorganic acidity. The observed trends in water chemistry suggest lakes may not return to reference conditions. Despite declines in acid deposition, many of these lakes are still acidified. Base cation concentrations continue to decline and alkalinity shows only small increases. A changing climate may further delay recovery by increasing dissolved organic carbon concentrations and sea-salt episodes. More intensive forest harvesting may also hamper recovery by reducing the supply of soil base cations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25403971 View in PubMed
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Simple models to estimate historical and recent changes of total organic carbon concentrations in lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266294
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jan 6;49(1):386-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-6-2015
Author
Salar Valinia
Martyn N Futter
Bernard J Cosby
Peter Rosén
Jens Fölster
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jan 6;49(1):386-94
Date
Jan-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon - analysis
Environment
Europe
Lakes - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Organic Chemicals - chemistry
Sulfur
Sweden
Water - chemistry
Abstract
Quantifying human impacts on the natural environment requires credible reconstructions of reference conditions. Anthropogenic acidification of surface waters is strongly influenced by total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations. Because both the degree of acidification and recovery are dependent on historical TOC concentrations, simple models to estimate changes in surface water TOC between reference conditions (1860) and the present day (2012) are needed. We used visible near infrared spectroscopy (VNIRS) of lake sediments to reconstruct reference condition TOC and long-term monitoring data to predict recent changes. Two empirical models were developed to predict: (i) historical TOC trends between reference conditions (1860) and peak acidification (1980) and (ii) trends in TOC between 1988 and 2012. The models were statistically robust with adj. R(2) of (i) 0.85 and (ii) 0.71, respectively. Models were driven by lake and catchment area, wetlands, historical sulfur deposition and water chemistry. Present day TOC concentrations are similar to VNIRS-reconstructed and modeled reference condition TOC in Swedish lakes. The results are valuable for understanding drivers of TOC changes in lakes and for more credible assessments of reference conditions needed for water management in Europe and elsewhere.
PubMed ID
25485992 View in PubMed
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Spatiotemporal patterns of drivers of episodic acidification in Swedish streams and their relationships to hydrometeorological factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96317
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Jul 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-2010
Author
Martin Erlandsson
Hjalmar Laudon
Jens Fölster
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7050, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Jul 14;
Date
Jul-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study examined the spatiotemporal patterns of episodic acidification in 87 weakly buffered streams in Sweden at a monthly sampling frequency during a ten-year study period (1998-2007). Time series of pre-industrial pH (pH(0)) were reconstructed from the acidification model Meta(MAGIC), and the acidification impact was defined by the difference between the pH(0) and the contemporary pH (i.e., DeltapH=pH(0)-pH(t)). Acidification episodes were defined as observations for which the pH(t) was at least 0.4 units lower than average, in combination with a pH at least 0.2 units higher than average. Thus, only occasions in which the stream water was both more acidic and more acidified than average were characterized as acidification episodes. For each observed episode, the primary cause was identified from one of the following five possible drivers: dilution, increase in sulfate, nitrate or organic acids, or sea salt deposition. In total, 258 episodes were observed during the study period. The study showed that streams that were acidified during baseflow (DeltapH>0.4), but not chronically acidic (pH>5.2), were subjected to regular episodic acidification. Dilution was the single most important cause and the main driver for 58% of the identified episodes. Increases in sulfate concentrations were also relatively common (26% of episodes), whereas increases in nitrate and organic acids as well as sea salt deposition were of minor importance. The total number of dilution-related acidification episodes within a year had a significant (p=0.005) positive correlation (r=+0.83) with the average annual precipitation. Occurrences of sulfate episodes were related to droughts during the preceding summers. While the number of streams that are susceptible to episodic acidification will decrease as a consequence of recovery from acidification, the hydrological and meteorological consequences of future climate change may make episodic acidification more common.
PubMed ID
20637494 View in PubMed
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The Swedish monitoring of surface waters: 50 years of adaptive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259826
Source
Ambio. 2014;43 Suppl 1:3-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jens Fölster
Richard K Johnson
Martyn N Futter
Anders Wilander
Source
Ambio. 2014;43 Suppl 1:3-18
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Environmental Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
European Union
Eutrophication
Fresh Water - analysis
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Sweden
Abstract
For more than 50 years, scientific insights from surface water monitoring have supported Swedish evidence-based environmental management. Efforts to understand and control eutrophication in the 1960s led to construction of wastewater treatment plants with phosphorus retention, while acid rain research in the 1970s contributed to international legislation curbing emissions. By the 1990s, long-time series were being used to infer climate effects on surface water chemistry and biology. Monitoring data play a key role in implementing the EU Water Framework Directive and other legislation and have been used to show beneficial effects of agricultural management on Baltic Sea eutrophication. The Swedish experience demonstrates that well-designed and financially supported surface water monitoring can be used to understand and manage a range of stressors and societal concerns. Using scientifically sound adaptive monitoring principles to balance continuity and change has ensured long-time series and the capability to address new questions over time.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25403966 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.