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Alaska Influenza Surveillance Summary, 2015–16 Season.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301023
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.22.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 20, 2016
  1 document  
Author
Donna Fearey
Anna Frick
Jayme Parker
Nisha Fowler
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.22.
Date
September 20, 2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
75554
Keywords
Alaska
Influenza
Surveillance
Mortality
Documents
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Correction for Hansen et al., Draft Genome Sequence of a Taxonomically Unique Neisseria Strain Isolated from a Greater White-Fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) Egg on the North Slope of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270111
Source
Genome Announc. 2016;4(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Cristina M Hansen
Sang Chul Choi
Jayme Parker
Karsten Hueffer
Jack Chen
Source
Genome Announc. 2016;4(1)
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Notes
ErratumFor: Genome Announc. 2015;3(4). pii: e00772-15. doi: 10.1128/genomeA.00772-1526184936
PubMed ID
26868411 View in PubMed
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Draft Genome Sequence of a Taxonomically Unique Neisseria Strain Isolated from a Greater White-Fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) Egg on the North Slope of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264774
Source
Genome Announc. 2015;3(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cristina M Hansen
Sang Chul Choi
Jayme Parker
Karsten Hueffer
Jack Chen
Source
Genome Announc. 2015;3(4)
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We report here the draft genome sequence of a unique Neisseria strain that was isolated from a greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) egg. The sequencing was performed with an Illumina MiSeq system, and the sequence consists of 275 contigs. The total genome is 2,397,978 bp long and has a G+C content of 46.4%.
PubMed ID
26184936 View in PubMed
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Investigation of a Canine Parvovirus Outbreak using Next Generation Sequencing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299517
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 29; 7(1):9633
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-29-2017
Author
Jayme Parker
Molly Murphy
Karsten Hueffer
Jack Chen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 29; 7(1):9633
Date
08-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - virology
Dogs
Genotype
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Molecular Epidemiology
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Parvovirus, Canine - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
RNA, Viral - chemistry - genetics
Rectum - virology
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Abstract
Canine parvovirus (CPV) outbreaks can have a devastating effect in communities with dense dog populations. The interior region of Alaska experienced a CPV outbreak in the winter of 2016 leading to the further investigation of the virus due to reports of increased morbidity and mortality occurring at dog mushing kennels in the area. Twelve rectal-swab specimens from dogs displaying clinical signs consistent with parvoviral-associated disease were processed using next-generation sequencing (NGS) methodologies by targeting RNA transcripts, and therefore detecting only replicating virus. All twelve specimens demonstrated the presence of the CPV transcriptome, with read depths ranging from 2.2X - 12,381X, genome coverage ranging from 44.8-96.5%, and representation of CPV sequencing reads to those of the metagenome background ranging from 0.0015-6.7%. Using the data generated by NGS, the presence of newly evolved, yet known, strains of both CPV-2a and CPV-2b were identified and grouped geographically. Deep-sequencing data provided additional diagnostic information in terms of investigating novel CPV in this outbreak. NGS data in addition to limited serological data provided strong diagnostic evidence that this outbreak most likely arose from unvaccinated or under-vaccinated canines, not from a novel CPV strain incapable of being neutralized by current vaccination efforts.
PubMed ID
28852158 View in PubMed
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Laboratory-based respiratory virus surveillance pilot project on select cruise ships in Alaska, 2013-15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289899
Source
J Travel Med. 2017 Sep 01; 24(6):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-01-2017
Author
Kimberly B Rogers
Shahrokh Roohi
Timothy M Uyeki
David Montgomery
Jayme Parker
Nisha H Fowler
Xiyan Xu
Deandra J Ingram
Donna Fearey
Steve M Williams
Grant Tarling
Clive M Brown
Nicole J Cohen
Author Affiliation
Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Source
J Travel Med. 2017 Sep 01; 24(6):
Date
Sep-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A virus - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Nose - virology
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance
Ships
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
Influenza outbreaks can occur among passengers and crews during the Alaska summertime cruise season. Ill travellers represent a potential source for introduction of novel or antigenically drifted influenza virus strains to the United States. From May to September 2013-2015, the Alaska Division of Public Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and two cruise lines implemented a laboratory-based public health surveillance project to detect influenza and other respiratory viruses among ill crew members and passengers on select cruise ships in Alaska.
Cruise ship medical staff collected 2-3 nasopharyngeal swab specimens per week from passengers and crew members presenting to the ship infirmary with acute respiratory illness (ARI). Specimens were tested for respiratory viruses at the Alaska State Virology Laboratory (ASVL); a subset of specimens positive for influenza virus were sent to CDC for further antigenic characterization.
Of 410 nasopharyngeal specimens, 83% tested positive for at least one respiratory virus; 71% tested positive for influenza A or B virus. Antigenic characterization of pilot project specimens identified strains matching predominant circulating seasonal influenza virus strains, which were included in the northern or southern hemisphere influenza vaccines during those years. Results were relatively consistent across age groups, recent travel history, and influenza vaccination status. Onset dates of illness relative to date of boarding differed between northbound (occurring later in the voyage) and southbound (occurring within the first days of the voyage) cruises.
The high yield of positive results indicated that influenza was common among passengers and crews sampled with ARI. This finding reinforces the need to bolster influenza prevention and control activities on cruise ships. Laboratory-based influenza surveillance on cruise ships may augment inland influenza surveillance and inform control activities. However, these benefits should be weighed against the costs and operational limitations of instituting laboratory-based surveillance programs on ships.
Notes
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2003 May 1;36(9):1095-102 PMID 12715302
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Aug;31(2):433-8 PMID 10987701
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Nov;16(11):1731-7 PMID 21029531
Cites: J Travel Med. 2015 Sep-Oct;22(5):306-11 PMID 26031322
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1987 Oct 30;36(42):697-8, 704 PMID 3118162
Cites: J Virol. 2009 Oct;83(19):10309-13 PMID 19605485
Cites: Int Marit Health. 2010;62(4):241-5 PMID 21348018
PubMed ID
29088487 View in PubMed
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