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Interactions of climate, socio-economics, and global mercury pollution in the North Water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295701
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):281-295
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Rune Dietz
Anders Mosbech
Janne Flora
Igor Eulaers
Author Affiliation
Arctic Research Centre, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark. rdi@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):281-295
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental monitoring
Greenland
Humans
Mercury - analysis - toxicity
Selenium
Water
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Despite the remoteness of the North Water, Northwest Greenland, the local Inughuit population is affected by global anthropogenic pollution and climate change. Using a cross-disciplinary approach combining Mercury (Hg) analysis, catch information, and historical and anthropological perspectives, this article elucidates how the traditional diet is compromised by Hg pollution originating from lower latitudes. In a new approach we here show how the Inughuits in Avanersuaq are subject to high Hg exposure from the hunted traditional food, consisting of mainly marine seabirds and mammals. Violation of the provisional tolerably yearly intake of Hg, on average by a factor of 11 (range 7-15) over the last 20 years as well as the provisional tolerably monthly intake by a factor of 6 (range 2-16), raises health concerns. The surplus of Selenium (Se) in wildlife tissues including narwhals showed Se:Hg molar ratios of 1.5, 2.3, and 16.7 in muscle, liver, and mattak, respectively, likely to provide some protection against the high Hg exposure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29516443 View in PubMed
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Is sustainable resource utilisation a relevant concept in Avanersuaq? The walrus case.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295700
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):265-280
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Astrid Oberborbeck Andersen
Mads Peter Heide-Jørgensen
Janne Flora
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. aoa@learning.aau.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):265-280
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources
Greenland
Population Dynamics
Walruses
Abstract
This article addresses the role of Atlantic walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) in present-day Avanersuaq from anthropological and biological perspectives, and asks whether or not sustainable resource utilisation is a useful concept in northwest Greenland. We describe the relations that unfold around walrus and walrus hunting, in the communities living adjacent to the North Water polynya on the eastern side of Smith Sound. We examine the interplay of walrus population abundance, hunting practices, uses, and formal (governmental) and informal (traditional) ways of regulating the hunt, and we analyse how walruses acquire multiple values as they circulate in different networks. Sustainable resource utilisation, we conclude, is a concept that is relevant in Avanersuaq and beyond, because it works as a biological standard, and hence organises laws, norms, and practices of formal management. Simultaneously, the term is problematic, because it ignores manifold levels of human and societal values connected to walrus.
Notes
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):162-174 PMID 29516442
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):213-225 PMID 29520750
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):244-264 PMID 29520751
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1998 Oct;7(10):1323-36 PMID 9787444
PubMed ID
29516444 View in PubMed
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On the crucial importance of a small bird: The ecosystem services of the little auk (Alle alle) population in Northwest Greenland in a long-term perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295704
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):226-243
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Anders Mosbech
Kasper Lambert Johansen
Thomas A Davidson
Martin Appelt
Bjarne Grønnow
Christine Cuyler
Peter Lyngs
Janne Flora
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark. amo@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):226-243
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds
Charadriiformes
Ecology
Ecosystem
Greenland
Abstract
The little auk is the most numerous seabird in the North Atlantic and its most important breeding area is the eastern shores of the North Water polynya. Here, a population of an estimated 33 million pairs breeds in huge colonies and significantly shapes the ecosystem. Archaeological remains in the colonies document that the little auk has been harvested over millennia. Anthropological research discloses how the little auk has a role both as social engineer and as a significant resource for the Inughuit today. The hunting can be practiced without costly equipment, and has no gender and age discrimination in contrast to the dominant hunt for marine mammals. Little auks are ecological engineers in the sense that they transport vast amounts of nutrients from sea to land, where the nutrients are deposited as guano. Here, the fertilized vegetation provides important foraging opportunities for hares, geese, fox, reindeer, and the introduced muskox. We estimate that the relative muskox density is ten times higher within 1 km of little auk fertilized vegetation hotspots.
PubMed ID
29516440 View in PubMed
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Present and past dynamics of Inughuit resource spaces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290173
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):244-264
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Janne Flora
Kasper Lambert Johansen
Bjarne Grønnow
Astrid Oberborbeck Andersen
Anders Mosbech
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. jakf@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):244-264
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Information from a collaborative GPS tracking project, Piniariarneq, involving 17 occupational hunters from Qaanaaq and Savissivik, Northwest Greenland, is used to explore the resource spaces of hunters in Avanersuaq today. By comparison with historical records from the time of the Thule Trading Station and the decades following its closure, we reveal a marked variability in resource spaces over time. It is argued that the dynamics of resources and resource spaces in Thule are not underlain by animal distribution and migration patterns, or changes in weather and sea ice conditions alone; but also by economic opportunities, human mobility, settlement patterns, particular historical events and trajectories, and not least by economic and political interests developed outside the region.
Notes
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
PubMed ID
29520751 View in PubMed
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Present and past dynamics of Inughuit resource spaces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295697
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):244-264
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Janne Flora
Kasper Lambert Johansen
Bjarne Grønnow
Astrid Oberborbeck Andersen
Anders Mosbech
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. jakf@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):244-264
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Greenland
Humans
Ice Cover
Weather
Abstract
Information from a collaborative GPS tracking project, Piniariarneq, involving 17 occupational hunters from Qaanaaq and Savissivik, Northwest Greenland, is used to explore the resource spaces of hunters in Avanersuaq today. By comparison with historical records from the time of the Thule Trading Station and the decades following its closure, we reveal a marked variability in resource spaces over time. It is argued that the dynamics of resources and resource spaces in Thule are not underlain by animal distribution and migration patterns, or changes in weather and sea ice conditions alone; but also by economic opportunities, human mobility, settlement patterns, particular historical events and trajectories, and not least by economic and political interests developed outside the region.
Notes
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
PubMed ID
29520751 View in PubMed
Less detail