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Obesity studies in the circumpolar Inuit: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122841
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18698
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
  1 document  
Author
Tracey Galloway
Hilary Blackett
Susan Chatwood
Charlotte Jeppesen
Kami Kandola
Janice Linton
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous People's Nutrition and Environment, School of Dietetics and Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. tracey.galloway@mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18698
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
287202
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Among circumpolar populations, recent research has documented a significant increase in risk factors which are commonly associated with chronic disease, notably obesity.
The present study undertakes a scoping review of research on obesity in the circumpolar Inuit to determine the extent obesity research has been undertaken, how well all subpopulations and geographic areas are represented, the methodologies used and whether they are sufficient in describing risk factors, and the prevalence and health outcomes associated with obesity.
Online databases were used to identify papers published 1992-2011, from which we selected 38 publications from Canada, the United States, and Greenland that used obesity as a primary or secondary outcome variable in 30 or more non-pregnant Inuit ("Eskimo") participants aged 2 years or older.
The majority of publications (92%) reported cross-sectional studies while 8% examined retrospective cohorts. All but one of the studies collected measured data. Overall 84% of the publications examined obesity in adults. Those examining obesity in children focused on early childhood or adolescence. While most (66%) reported 1 or more anthropometric indices, none incorporated direct measures of adiposity. Evaluated using a customized quality assessment instrument, 26% of studies achieved an "A" quality ranking, while 18 and 39% achieved quality rankings of "B" and "C", respectively.
While the quality of studies is generally high, research on obesity among Inuit would benefit from careful selection of methods and reference standards, direct measures of adiposity in adults and children, studies of preadolescent children, and prospective cohort studies linking early childhood exposures with obesity outcomes throughout childhood and adolescence.
PubMed ID
22765938 View in PubMed
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Performance indicators for maternity care in a circumpolar context: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279888
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):31470
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Rebecca Rich
Thomsen D'Hont
Janice Linton
Kellie E Murphy
Jeremy Veillard
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):31470
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background In circumpolar regions, harsh climates and scattered populations have prompted the centralization of care and reduction of local maternity services. The resulting practice of routine evacuation for birth from smaller towns to larger urban centres points to a potential conflict between the necessity to ensure patient safety and the importance of delivering services that are responsive to the health needs and values of populations served. Objective To identify recommended performance/quality indicators for use in circumpolar maternity care systems. Methods We searched Scopus, Ebscohost databases (including Academic Search Complete and CINAHL), the Global Health Database, High North Research Documents, and online grey literature. Articles were included if they focused on maternal health indicators in the population of interest (Indigenous women, women receiving care in circumpolar or remote regions). Articles were excluded if they were not related to pregnancy, birth or the immediate post-partum or neonatal periods. Two reviewers independently reviewed articles for inclusion and extracted relevant data. Results Twenty-six documents were included. Twelve were government documents, seven were review articles or indicator compilations, four were indicator sets recommended by academics or non-governmental organizations and three were research papers. We extracted and categorized 81 unique health indicators. The majority of indicators reflected health systems processes and outcomes during the antenatal and intra-partum periods. Only two governmental indicator sets explicitly considered the needs of Indigenous peoples. Conclusions This review demonstrates that, although most circumpolar health systems engage in performance reporting for maternity care, efforts to capture local priorities and values are limited in most regions. Future work in this area should involve northern stakeholders in the process of indicator selection and development.
PubMed ID
28156412 View in PubMed
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Performance indicators for maternity care in a circumpolar context: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289509
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31470
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
2016
Author
Rebecca Rich
Thomsen D'Hont
Janice Linton
Kellie E Murphy
Jeremy Veillard
Susan Chatwood
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31470
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Female
Humans
Inuits
Maternal Health Services - standards
Pregnancy
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Abstract
In circumpolar regions, harsh climates and scattered populations have prompted the centralization of care and reduction of local maternity services. The resulting practice of routine evacuation for birth from smaller towns to larger urban centres points to a potential conflict between the necessity to ensure patient safety and the importance of delivering services that are responsive to the health needs and values of populations served.
To identify recommended performance/quality indicators for use in circumpolar maternity care systems.
We searched Scopus, Ebscohost databases (including Academic Search Complete and CINAHL), the Global Health Database, High North Research Documents, and online grey literature. Articles were included if they focused on maternal health indicators in the population of interest (Indigenous women, women receiving care in circumpolar or remote regions). Articles were excluded if they were not related to pregnancy, birth or the immediate post-partum or neonatal periods. Two reviewers independently reviewed articles for inclusion and extracted relevant data.
Twenty-six documents were included. Twelve were government documents, seven were review articles or indicator compilations, four were indicator sets recommended by academics or non-governmental organizations and three were research papers. We extracted and categorized 81 unique health indicators. The majority of indicators reflected health systems processes and outcomes during the antenatal and intra-partum periods. Only two governmental indicator sets explicitly considered the needs of Indigenous peoples.
This review demonstrates that, although most circumpolar health systems engage in performance reporting for maternity care, efforts to capture local priorities and values are limited in most regions. Future work in this area should involve northern stakeholders in the process of indicator selection and development.
Notes
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013 Sep 14;13:175 PMID 24034451
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Oct;31(10):956-62 PMID 19941725
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2029-31 PMID 16782494
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-78 PMID 8956834
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Dec;32(12):1186-8 PMID 21375068
Cites: Birth. 2012 Sep;39(3):230-7 PMID 23281905
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Sep 23-30;260(12):1743-8 PMID 3045356
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2006 Sep;18 Suppl 1:5-13 PMID 16954510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 Nov;61(4):300-18 PMID 12546189
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jun;37(4):347-56 PMID 19435755
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Jan;115(1):e44-51 PMID 15629965
Cites: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;52(4):384-91 PMID 17603961
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2009 Aug 18;151(4):264-9, W64 PMID 19622511
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-75 PMID 19577695
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013 Aug 30;13:167 PMID 24000821
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Apr;119(4):e928-39 PMID 17403832
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Jun;66(3):215-25 PMID 17655062
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 14;72:null PMID 23961514
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Jul-Sep;10(3):1383 PMID 20707592
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2013 Apr;23(2):195-201 PMID 23402806
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Sep 11;177(6):583-90 PMID 17846440
Cites: Health Place. 2010 Jul;16(4):638-45 PMID 20171925
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2012 Aug;20(4):228-37 PMID 22827433
PubMed ID
27938636 View in PubMed
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Performance indicators for maternity care in a circumpolar context: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289667
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31470
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
2016
Author
Rebecca Rich
Thomsen D'Hont
Janice Linton
Kellie E Murphy
Jeremy Veillard
Susan Chatwood
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31470
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Female
Humans
Inuits
Maternal Health Services - standards
Pregnancy
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Abstract
In circumpolar regions, harsh climates and scattered populations have prompted the centralization of care and reduction of local maternity services. The resulting practice of routine evacuation for birth from smaller towns to larger urban centres points to a potential conflict between the necessity to ensure patient safety and the importance of delivering services that are responsive to the health needs and values of populations served.
To identify recommended performance/quality indicators for use in circumpolar maternity care systems.
We searched Scopus, Ebscohost databases (including Academic Search Complete and CINAHL), the Global Health Database, High North Research Documents, and online grey literature. Articles were included if they focused on maternal health indicators in the population of interest (Indigenous women, women receiving care in circumpolar or remote regions). Articles were excluded if they were not related to pregnancy, birth or the immediate post-partum or neonatal periods. Two reviewers independently reviewed articles for inclusion and extracted relevant data.
Twenty-six documents were included. Twelve were government documents, seven were review articles or indicator compilations, four were indicator sets recommended by academics or non-governmental organizations and three were research papers. We extracted and categorized 81 unique health indicators. The majority of indicators reflected health systems processes and outcomes during the antenatal and intra-partum periods. Only two governmental indicator sets explicitly considered the needs of Indigenous peoples.
This review demonstrates that, although most circumpolar health systems engage in performance reporting for maternity care, efforts to capture local priorities and values are limited in most regions. Future work in this area should involve northern stakeholders in the process of indicator selection and development.
Notes
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013 Sep 14;13:175 PMID 24034451
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Oct;31(10):956-62 PMID 19941725
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2029-31 PMID 16782494
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-78 PMID 8956834
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Dec;32(12):1186-8 PMID 21375068
Cites: Birth. 2012 Sep;39(3):230-7 PMID 23281905
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Sep 23-30;260(12):1743-8 PMID 3045356
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2006 Sep;18 Suppl 1:5-13 PMID 16954510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 Nov;61(4):300-18 PMID 12546189
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jun;37(4):347-56 PMID 19435755
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Jan;115(1):e44-51 PMID 15629965
Cites: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;52(4):384-91 PMID 17603961
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2009 Aug 18;151(4):264-9, W64 PMID 19622511
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-75 PMID 19577695
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013 Aug 30;13:167 PMID 24000821
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Apr;119(4):e928-39 PMID 17403832
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Jun;66(3):215-25 PMID 17655062
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 14;72:null PMID 23961514
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Jul-Sep;10(3):1383 PMID 20707592
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2013 Apr;23(2):195-201 PMID 23402806
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Sep 11;177(6):583-90 PMID 17846440
Cites: Health Place. 2010 Jul;16(4):638-45 PMID 20171925
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2012 Aug;20(4):228-37 PMID 22827433
PubMed ID
27938636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Performance indicators for maternity care in a circumpolar context: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277978
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:31470
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Rebecca Rich
Thomsen D'Hont
Janice Linton
Kellie E Murphy
Jeremy Veillard
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:31470
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In circumpolar regions, harsh climates and scattered populations have prompted the centralization of care and reduction of local maternity services. The resulting practice of routine evacuation for birth from smaller towns to larger urban centres points to a potential conflict between the necessity to ensure patient safety and the importance of delivering services that are responsive to the health needs and values of populations served.
To identify recommended performance/quality indicators for use in circumpolar maternity care systems.
We searched Scopus, Ebscohost databases (including Academic Search Complete and CINAHL), the Global Health Database, High North Research Documents, and online grey literature. Articles were included if they focused on maternal health indicators in the population of interest (Indigenous women, women receiving care in circumpolar or remote regions). Articles were excluded if they were not related to pregnancy, birth or the immediate post-partum or neonatal periods. Two reviewers independently reviewed articles for inclusion and extracted relevant data.
Twenty-six documents were included. Twelve were government documents, seven were review articles or indicator compilations, four were indicator sets recommended by academics or non-governmental organizations and three were research papers. We extracted and categorized 81 unique health indicators. The majority of indicators reflected health systems processes and outcomes during the antenatal and intra-partum periods. Only two governmental indicator sets explicitly considered the needs of Indigenous peoples.
This review demonstrates that, although most circumpolar health systems engage in performance reporting for maternity care, efforts to capture local priorities and values are limited in most regions. Future work in this area should involve northern stakeholders in the process of indicator selection and development.
PubMed ID
27938636 View in PubMed
Less detail

A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261034
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Redvers
Peter Bjerregaard
Heidi Eriksen
Sahar Fanian
Gwen Healey
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Michael Jong
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Janice Linton
Nathaniel Pollock
Anne Silviken
Petter Stoor
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
636900
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Mental health
Needs Assessment
Population Groups/ethnology
Population Groups/statistics & numerical data
Primary Prevention/organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Suicide/prevention & control
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Background. Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. Objective. Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. Design. We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004 and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. Results. Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar Indigenous populations; 19 articles discussed specific suicide-related interventions and 7 of these described program evaluation methods and results in detail. The majority of publications on specific interventions were found in North American countries. The majority of prevention or intervention documentation was found in supporting grey literature sources. Conclusion. Despite widespread concern about suicide in the circumpolar world and active community efforts to promote resilience and mental well-being, we found few recorded programs or initiatives documented in the peer-reviewed literature, and even fewer focusing specifically on youth intervention. The interventions described in the studies we found had diverse program designs and content, and used varied evaluation methods and outcomes. The studies we included consistently reported that it was important to use community-based and culturally guided interventions and evaluations. This article summarizes the current climate of Indigenous circumpolar suicide research in the context of intervention and highlights how intervention-based outcomes have largely remained outside of peer-reviewed sources in this region of the world.
PubMed ID
25742882 View in PubMed
Documents
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6 records – page 1 of 1.