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25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127603
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Morten Schmidt
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Timothy L Lash
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. msc@dce.au.dk
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine 25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction in Denmark, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity.
Nationwide population based cohort study using medical registries.
All hospitals in Denmark.
234,331 patients with a first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction from 1984 through 2008.
Standardised incidence rate of myocardial infarction and 30 day and 31-365 day mortality by sex. Comorbidity categories were defined as normal, moderate, severe, and very severe according to the Charlson comorbidity index, and were compared by means of mortality rate ratios based on Cox regression.
The standardised incidence rate per 100,000 people decreased in the 25 year period by 37% for women (from 209 to 131) and by 48% for men (from 410 to 213). The 30 day, 31-365 day, and one year mortality declined from 31.4%, 15.6%, and 42.1% in 1984-8 to 14.8%, 11.1%, and 24.2% in 2004-8, respectively. After adjustment for age at time of myocardial infarction, men and women had the same one year risk of dying. The mortality reduction was independent of comorbidity category. Comparing patients with very severe versus normal comorbidity during 2004-8, the mortality rate ratio, adjusted for age and sex, was 1.96 (95% CI 1.83 to 2.11) within 30 days and 3.89 (3.58 to 4.24) within 31-365 days.
The rate of first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction and subsequent short term mortality both declined by nearly half between 1984 and 2008. The reduction in mortality occurred for all patients, independent of sex and comorbidity. However, comorbidity burden was a strong prognostic factor for short and long term mortality, while sex was not.
Notes
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Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Apr;9(4):18622348972
Comment In: BMJ. 2012;344:d780922279112
PubMed ID
22279115 View in PubMed
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Bone metastasis, skeletal-related events, and mortality in lung cancer patients: a Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264865
Source
Lung Cancer. 2014 Nov;86(2):247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Karynsa Cetin
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Mette Nørgaard
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Lung Cancer. 2014 Nov;86(2):247-54
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - secondary
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the incidence rate of bone metastasis and subsequent skeletal-related events (SREs) (radiation to bone, spinal cord compression, fracture, and surgery to bone) in lung cancer patients and to quantify their impact on mortality.
We conducted a nationwide cohort study of patients diagnosed with lung cancer between 1999 and 2010 in Denmark. We computed the cumulative incidence (%) of bone metastasis and subsequent SREs (treating death as a competing risk) and corresponding incidence rates (per 1000 person-years). Survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method for three dynamic lung cancer patient cohorts-no bone metastasis; bone metastasis without SREs; and bone metastasis with SREs. Based on a Cox proportional hazards model, we computed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) comparing mortality rates between these patient cohorts, adjusting for age, comorbidity, stage, and histology. Analyses were conducted for the lung cancer patient cohort overall and by histologic subtype.
We identified 29,720 patients with incident lung cancer (median follow-up: 7.3 months). The 1-year cumulative incidence of bone metastasis was 5.9%, and the 1-year cumulative incidence of subsequent SREs was 55.0%. The incidence of bone metastasis and SREs was higher in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) versus SCLC. One-year survival was 37.4% in patients with no bone metastasis; 12.1% in patients with bone metastasis without SREs; and 5.1% in patients with both bone metastasis and SREs. When mortality rates between patients with bone metastasis with and without an SRE were compared, 2-month mortality rates were similar, but the >2-month adjusted MRR was 2.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.7-2.2).
Bone metastases predict a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. The majority of lung cancer patients with bone metastasis will also experience an SRE, which may further increase the rate of mortality.
PubMed ID
25240518 View in PubMed
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Long-term mortality and recurrence after colorectal cancer surgery with preoperative stenting: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270520
Source
Endoscopy. 2015 Jun;47(6):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Rune Erichsen
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Tove Nilsson
John A Baron
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Endoscopy. 2015 Jun;47(6):517-24
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Colorectal Neoplasms - complications - mortality - surgery
Denmark
Elective Surgical Procedures
Emergencies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Intestinal Obstruction - etiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - etiology
Preoperative Care - adverse effects - methods
Registries
Self Expandable Metallic Stents - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) used as a bridge to surgery for obstructive colorectal cancer (CRC) have fallen under suspicion for inducing tumor dissemination, and thereby increasing recurrence risk and long-term mortality. The aim of this study was to compare overall mortality and CRC recurrence in patients receiving preoperative SEMS vs. patients undergoing urgent resection.
This was a Danish, nationwide, population-based cohort study (2005?-?2010). For patients with CRC who survived the first 30 days after resection, the long-term survival in terms of mortality rate ratios was assessed using Cox regression with adjustment for important covariates. For patients with Dukes' A?-?C disease only, recurrence risk was similarly assessed using incidence rate ratios.
The 5-year survival was 49?% among 581 patients with preoperative SEMS and 40?% among 3333 patients undergoing urgent resection, corresponding to an adjusted mortality rate ratio of 0.98 (95?% confidence interval [CI] 0.90 to 1.07). For patients with Dukes' stage A?-?C disease, the 5-year recurrence risk was 39?% among 286 patients after preoperative SEMS and 30?% among 1627 patients after urgent resection, corresponding to an adjusted incidence rate ratio of 1.12 (95?%CI 0.99 to 1.28).
Long-term mortality associated with the use of SEMS as a bridge to surgery was comparable to that of urgent resection. SEMS use may be associated with an increased CRC recurrence risk.
Notes
Comment In: Endoscopy. 2015 Jun;47(6):57126030899
PubMed ID
25590181 View in PubMed
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Non-melanoma skin cancer and ten-year all-cause mortality: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96570
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Anna Lei Lamberg
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Anne Braae Olesen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark. aoj@dce.au.dk
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):362-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Confounding from comorbidity and socioeconomic status may have biased earlier findings of all-cause mortality among patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We therefore examined all-cause mortality among 72,295 Danish patients with BCC, 11,601 with SCC, and 383,714 age- and gender-matched population control cohort subjects with extensive control for comorbidity and socioeconomic status. Data on cancer, death, and socioeconomic status were obtained from medical databases and Statistics Denmark. We analysed data using Cox regression analysis, with estimation of 10-year mortality rate ratios (MRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Mortality was reduced among patients with BCC (10-year MRR = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.89-0.92) and did not vary by age, comorbidity, or socioeconomic status. Mortality among patients with SCC was increased and varied by age, selected chronic diseases, but not socioeconomic status. The reduced mortality observed among patients with BCC and the increased mortality among patients with SCC persisted even after extensive control for comorbidity and socioeconomic status.
PubMed ID
20574600 View in PubMed
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Skeletal related events, bone metastasis and survival of prostate cancer: a population based cohort study in Denmark (1999 to 2007).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96934
Source
J Urol. 2010 Jul;184(1):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Mette Nørgaard
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Kara Cetin
Jon P Fryzek
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark, and Global Epidemiology, Amgen, Inc. (KC, JPF), Thousand Oaks, California, USA.
Source
J Urol. 2010 Jul;184(1):162-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Neoplasms - mortality - secondary
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Registries
Survival Analysis
Abstract
PURPOSE: We describe mortality in patients with prostate cancer with and without bone metastasis further characterized by skeletal related events. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a cohort study of 23,087 incident patients with prostate cancer with a median 2.2-year followup identified through the Danish National Patient Registry from 1999 to 2007. We estimated the cumulative incidence of bone metastasis and skeletal related events, and described survival using the Kaplan-Meier method. Based on a Cox proportional hazard model we estimated mortality rate ratios and associated 95% CIs comparing mortality rates between patients by bone metastasis with and without skeletal related events, adjusting for age and comorbidity. RESULTS: Of the patients 569 (almost 3%) presented with bone metastasis at prostate cancer diagnosis, of whom 248 (43.6%) experienced a skeletal related event during followup. Of the 22,404 men (97% overall) without bone metastasis at diagnosis 2,578 (11.5%) were diagnosed with bone metastasis and 1,329 (5.9%) also experienced a skeletal related event during followup. One and 5-year survival was 87% and 56% in patients with prostate cancer without bone metastasis, 47% and 3% in those with bone metastasis, and 40% and less than 1% in those with bone metastasis and skeletal related events, respectively. Compared with men with prostate cancer without bone metastasis the adjusted 1-year mortality rate ratio was 4.7 (95% CI 4.3-5.2) in those with bone metastasis and no skeletal related events, and 6.6 (95% CI 5.9-7.5) in those with bone metastasis and a skeletal related event. CONCLUSIONS: Bone metastasis and skeletal related events predict poor prognosis in men with prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
20483155 View in PubMed
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Survival in breast cancer patients with bone metastases and skeletal-related events: a population-based cohort study in Denmark (1999-2007).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135623
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011 Sep;129(2):495-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Mellissa Yong
Annette Östergaard Jensen
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Mette Nørgaard
Jon P Fryzek
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc, One Amgen Center Drive, MS: 24-2-A, Thousand Oaks, CA, 91320, USA. myong@amgen.com
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011 Sep;129(2):495-503
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - complications - mortality - secondary - therapy
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - etiology - mortality
Humans
Hypercalcemia - etiology - mortality
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Neoplasm Staging
Orthopedic Procedures - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiotherapy - mortality
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Spinal Cord Compression - etiology - mortality
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bone lesions as a consequence of bone metastases in breast cancer patients can increase risk for skeletal-related events (SREs) (i.e., radiation to the bone, a pathological or osteoporotic fracture event, hypercalcemia, spinal cord compression, or surgery to the bone). The mortality risk for breast cancer patients with SREs subsequent to bone metastases is unclear. We assessed this relationship in a large, population-based cohort of breast cancer patients in Denmark. We identified 35,912 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2007 in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) and followed them through April 1, 2008. Information on stage and treatment was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate survival, and Cox's regression analysis to estimate the mortality rate ratio (MRR) by the presence of bone metastases with and without SREs, adjusting for age and comorbidity. The 5-year survival was 75.8% for breast cancer patients without bone metastases, 8.3% for patients with bone metastases, and 2.5% for those with both bone metastases and SREs. The adjusted MRR was 10.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 9.5-11.6] for breast cancer patients with bone metastases, and 14.4 (95% CI 13.1-15.8) for those with bone metastases and SREs, compared with breast cancer patients with no bone metastases but possibly other sites of metastases. A similar pattern persisted when analyses were stratified by stage or treatment. Breast cancer patients with bone metastases and SREs have a poor prognosis compared to those with and without bone metastases regardless of cancer treatment or stage of disease at diagnosis.
PubMed ID
21461730 View in PubMed
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Survival in patients with breast cancer with bone metastasis: a Danish population-based cohort study on the prognostic impact of initial stage of disease at breast cancer diagnosis and length of the bone metastasis-free interval.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269058
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(4):e007702
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Karynsa Cetin
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Claus Sværke
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(4):e007702
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Neoplasms - mortality - secondary
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Denmark
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Since population-based data on prognostic factors affecting survival in patients with breast cancer with bone metastasis (BM) are currently limited, we conducted this nationwide retrospective cohort study to examine the prognostic role of disease stage at breast cancer diagnosis and length of BM-free interval (BMFI).
Denmark.
2427 women with a breast cancer diagnosis between 1997 and 2011 in the Danish Cancer Registry and a concurrent or subsequent BM diagnosis in the Danish National Registry of Patients.
Survival (crude) based on Kaplan-Meier method and mortality risk (crude and adjusted for age, year of diagnosis, estrogen receptor status and comorbidity) based on Cox proportional hazards regression analyses by stage of disease at breast cancer diagnosis and by length of BMFI (time from breast cancer to BM diagnosis), following patients from BM diagnosis until death, emigration or until 31 December 2012, whichever came first.
Survival decreased with more advanced stage of disease at the time of breast cancer diagnosis; risk of mortality during the first year following a BM diagnosis was over two times higher for those presenting with metastatic versus localised disease (adjusted HR=2.12 (95% CI 1.71 to 2.62)). With respect to length of BMFI, survival was highest in women with a BMFI
Notes
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PubMed ID
25926150 View in PubMed
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Use of penicillin and other antibiotics and risk of multiple sclerosis: a population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131247
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Oct 15;174(8):945-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2011
Author
Mette Nørgaard
Rikke Beck Nielsen
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Jaimie L Gradus
Egon Stenager
Nils Koch-Henriksen
Timothy L Lash
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. m.noergaard@rn.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Oct 15;174(8):945-8
Date
Oct-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Penicillins - therapeutic use
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
A 2006 study from the United Kingdom found that penicillin use may decrease the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). To confirm this finding, the authors conducted a nationwide case-control study in Denmark, using the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry to identify 3,259 patients with MS onset from 1996 to 2008, and selected 10 population controls per case (n = 32,590), matched on sex and age. Through the National Prescription Database, prescriptions for antibiotics redeemed from 1995 to 2008 and before the date of first MS symptom/index date were identified. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to compute odds ratios associating antibiotic use with MS occurrence. In total, 1,922 patients (59%) redeemed penicillin prescriptions before the index date and 2,292 (70%) redeemed any type of antibiotic prescription. Penicillin use was associated with an increased risk of MS (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.27). Use of any type of antibiotic was similarly associated with an increased risk of MS (odds ratio = 1.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.29, 1.53). The odds ratios for different types of antibiotics ranged between 1.08 and 1.83. Thus, this study found that penicillin use and use of other antibiotics were similarly associated with increased risk of MS, suggesting that the underlying infections may be causally associated with MS.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr 1;175(7):728; author reply 728-922415033
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr 1;175(7):727-8; author reply 728-922415034
PubMed ID
21920946 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.