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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Adverse experiences during treatment with zimeldine on special licence in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46553
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1994;9(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
B O Bengtsson
B E Wiholm
M. Myrhed
J. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1994;9(1):55-61
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Approval - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Hypersensitivity - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination - drug effects
Zimeldine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Adverse experiences during licensed treatment with the antidepressant serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor zimeldine in Sweden are presented. Data were obtained from a written inquiry of 694 patients and 67 reports to the Medical Products Agency. The spectrum of adverse symptoms was in agreement with those reported in previous studies on zimeldine. The most frequent adverse experiences were headache, nausea, myalgia, signs of liver function disturbance, arthralgia, neurological symptoms, fever and insomnia. No new case of the Guillain-Barré syndrome was found. The estimated frequency of the zimeldine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), comprising fever, myalgia and/or arthralgia and signs of liver function disturbance, ranged from 1.4% to 13% in the inquiry and from 0.63% to 3.4% in the report part of the study. Adverse experiences usually had a considerably higher incidence during the first 6 weeks of zimeldine treatment than thereafter. This is in agreement with the clinical experience that most of the adverse reactions occur early during zimeldine treatment. However, a number of adverse experiences did occur with a later onset. This may justify a prolongation of the compulsory 4 weeks' testing of liver function that is required during licensed treatment. There were significantly fewer patients who developed fever among the patients who had experienced previous zimeldine treatment than among those who had not. Otherwise there was no statistically significant difference in frequency of adverse symptoms between these two groups. Consequently zimeldine treatment per se does not seem to predispose to development of an HSS or other types of adverse reactions during subsequent therapy.
PubMed ID
8195584 View in PubMed
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An educational program on depressive disorders for general practitioners on Gotland: background and evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46702
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1989 Jan;79(1):19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
W. Rutz
J. Wålinder
G. Eberhard
G. Holmberg
A L von Knorring
L. von Knorring
B. Wistedt
A. Aberg-Wistedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, St. Olof's Hospital, Visby, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1989 Jan;79(1):19-26
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education
Humans
Psychiatry - education
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
General practitioners are the psychiatrists' most important coworkers in the treatment of depressive disorders. A high degree of knowledge about this illness in this group of doctors is of decisive importance. However, the value of postgraduate educational programs for general practitioners has been questioned. The Swedish Committee for the Prevention and Treatment of Depression (PTD) offered an educational program on symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of depression to all general practitioners on the Swedish island of Gotland. Lectures on suicide, depressive illness in childhood and in old age and psychotherapy of depressive states were also given. In several control periods data were collected on suicides, referrals to the local psychiatric department, emergency admissions, the quantity of sick leave used and the quantity of inpatient care due to depression. Even the prescription of psychopharmacological drugs on the island was investigated. Overall, the results indicated that general practitioners gratefully accepted the educational program and achieved increasing competence and stringency in treating and preventing depressive states. The program was associated with decreases in the use of psychiatric inpatient care and the sick leave frequency of depressed patients. The possibility of preventing suicides was positively influenced.
PubMed ID
2929381 View in PubMed
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[A severe case of posttraumatic stress reaction. Cultural collision in Swedish health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64808
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Jun 16;90(24):2309-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-1993
Author
V. Johansson
T. Lundin
J. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Jun 16;90(24):2309-10
Date
Jun-16-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Afghanistan - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - psychology
Refugees - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - etiology
Sweden
War
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1993 Aug 11;90(32-33):26437734005
PubMed ID
8316006 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics of a total cohort of female and male applicants for sex reassignment: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33861
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Mar;97(3):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
M. Landén
J. Wålinder
B. Lundström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Mar;97(3):189-94
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Transsexualism - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare the features of female-to-male transsexuals (F-M) with those of male-to-female transsexuals (M-F) in the cohort of all applicants for sex reassignment over a 20-year period. In an observational, cross-sectional design the cohort was retrospectively identified, consisting of all 233 subjects who applied for sex reassignment in Sweden during the period 1972-1992. The cohort was subdivided into the groups M-F (n=134) and F-M (n=99), and the two groups were compared. M-F were older when applying for sex reassignment surgery than F-M, and more often had a history of marriage and children than their F-M counterparts. M-F also had more heterosexual experience. F-M, on the other hand, more frequently exhibited cross-gender behaviour in childhood than did M-F transsexuals. The present and previous studies strongly support the view that transsexualism manifests itself differently in males and females. Various models for understanding these differences are discussed.
PubMed ID
9543306 View in PubMed
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Cost-benefit analysis of an educational program for general practitioners by the Swedish Committee for the Prevention and Treatment of Depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36682
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1992 Jun;85(6):457-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
W. Rutz
P. Carlsson
L. von Knorring
J. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Visby Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1992 Jun;85(6):457-64
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Curriculum
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - prevention & control - psychology
Drug Utilization - economics
Education, Medical, Continuing - economics
Family Practice - education
Humans
Psychotherapy - education
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
In 1983-1984 the Swedish Committee for the Prevention and Treatment of Depression launched an educational program on the diagnosis and treatment of depressive disorders for all general practitioners on the island of Gotland. The baseline year chosen was 1982 and the immediate effects were evaluated in 1985. In 1988 the long-term effects were evaluated. These two evaluations indicated strictly time-related beneficial effects on the frequency of sick leave and inpatient care for depressive disorders, the pattern of prescription of psychopharmacologic drugs and the frequency of suicide. This article describes a cost-benefit analysis of the program. The cost of the educational program, changes in drug prescription and inpatient care were calculated as well as indirect costs concerning changes in morbidity and mortality. The calculation of the savings to society was subject to a sensitivity analysis. This shows that the educational program resulted in savings to society on the order of about SEK 155 million (USD 26 million). It is concluded that educational programs of this kind should be repeated every second to third year.
PubMed ID
1642130 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of clozapine treatment in therapy-refractory schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214518
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Sep;92(3):199-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
D. Jonsson
J. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Center for Medical Technology Assessment, University Hospital, Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Sep;92(3):199-201
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - economics
Clozapine - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - economics
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Adjustment
Sweden
Abstract
The costs and effects of clozapine treatment of refractory schizophrenic patients have been discussed recently. This study shows that 18 months of clozapine treatment results in an improvement of symptoms and social functioning in approximately 70% of treatment-refractory schizophrenic patients, compared with treatment with conventional neuroleptics during a similar period of time. Treatment with clozapine reduces the cost of inpatient care but places increased demands on active rehabilitation resources in outpatient care. This leads to increased total costs in a short-term perspective, but clozapine treatment is cost-saving for annual maintenance therapy. These costs must be weighed against the positive effects on psychotic symptoms and social functioning.
PubMed ID
7484198 View in PubMed
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[Depressions among the elderly. Attitudes and myths, facts and questions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46520
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Dec 21;91(51-52):4844-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1994

Effect of an educational program for general practitioners on Gotland on the pattern of prescription of psychotropic drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46663
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Dec;82(6):399-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
W. Rutz
L. von Knorring
J. Wålinder
B. Wistedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, St. Olof's Hospital, Visby, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Dec;82(6):399-403
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Curriculum
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy
Drug Utilization - trends
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Prescriptions, Drug
Psychiatry - education
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
During the years 1983-1984, an educational program was given to all general practitioners on the island of Gotland. This report evaluates changes in prescription habits from 1982 to 1985. To correct for general trends that occurred simultaneously, the prescription habits were compared to the habits in the rest of Sweden. Both on Gotland and in Sweden as a whole, the use of antidepressants increased from 1982-1985, but significantly more on Gotland. In 1982, the use of antidepressants was low on Gotland, 54% of that in the rest of Sweden. After the educational programs, Gotland reached 77% of the use in the rest of Sweden. In 1982, the use of lithium was 123% of that in the rest of Sweden. After the educational programs, the use of lithium was unchanged, and a small increase of 5.6% was seen in the rest of Sweden. After the educational programs, the prescription of sedatives on Gotland decreased (-8.2%), and an increase of 4.5% was seen in the rest of Sweden. The use of major tranquilizers also decreased significantly (-23%) on Gotland. Even in the rest of Sweden, a significant but much smaller decrease was seen: -13%. On Gotland the frequency of hypnotics remained stable from 1982-1985, and a significant increase was seen in the rest of Sweden.
PubMed ID
2291408 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of 294 psychiatric consultations involving in-patients above 70 years of age in somatic departments in a university hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74033
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1987 Aug;76(2):152-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1987
Author
H. Pauser
B. Bergström
J. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1987 Aug;76(2):152-7
Date
Aug-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Services for the Aged
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Referral and Consultation
Sweden
Abstract
The integrated geropsychiatric service of the Psychiatric Department of the University Hospital in Linköping consists of an observation ward, a day unit and an out-patient unit. One of the main tasks of the last-mentioned unit is to provide geropsychiatric consultations for in-patients in the non-psychiatric departments of the hospital. During the first 2 years from October 1982 to October 1984 300 consultations were performed. The consultations included registration of social, medical and psychiatric data, a psychiatric examination, discussions with the staff and a psychiatric report. Out of the total number of 300 consultations 294 could be evaluated completely. They comprised 247 individuals. The evaluation was performed after the first 2 years by screening the patients' psychiatric records and reports and by computer-analysis of 89 variables covering medical as well as social data. The patients' mean age was 78 years and 52% were treated in the Department of Internal Medicine. Fifty-three percent had had previous psychiatric contacts. Many were suffering from serious somatic diseases and 22% from depressive states. Only 9% showed no signs of psychiatric disorders. Twenty-three percent of the patients were transferred to the geropsychiatric observation ward or day unit and only 3% were recommended to be certified and transferred to a mental hospital. Pertinent findings are discussed in the light of international data on geropsychiatric consultations and liaison psychiatry. The study shows the importance of providing special geropsychiatric consultations for in-patients in somatic departments as a part of an integrated geropsychiatric service.
PubMed ID
3673638 View in PubMed
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Factors predictive of regret in sex reassignment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52655
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Apr;97(4):284-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
M. Landén
J. Wålinder
G. Hambert
B. Lundström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Apr;97(4):284-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Gender Identity
Genitalia, Female - surgery
Genitalia, Male - surgery
Humans
Male
Patient satisfaction
Patient Selection
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Transsexualism - psychology - surgery
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the features and calculate the frequency of sex-reassigned subjects who had applied for reversal to their biological sex, and to compare these with non-regretful subjects. An inception cohort was retrospectively identified consisting of all subjects with gender identity disorder who were approved for sex reassignment in Sweden during the period 1972-1992. The period of time that elapsed between the application and this evaluation ranged from 4 to 24 years. The total cohort consisted of 218 subjects. The results showed that 3.8% of the patients who were sex reassigned during 1972-1992 regretted the measures taken. The cohort was subdivided according to the presence or absence of regret of sex reassignment, and the two groups were compared. The results of logistic regression analysis indicated that two factors predicted regret of sex reassignment, namely lack of support from the patient's family, and the patient belonging to the non-core group of transsexuals. In conclusion, the results show that the outcome of sex reassignment has improved over the years. However, the identified risk factors indicate the need for substantial efforts to support the families and close friends of candidates for sex reassignment.
PubMed ID
9570489 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.